Resolved Bootcamp OS'S

Discussion in 'MacBook' started by chattahoochee, Jan 12, 2013.

  1. chattahoochee, Jan 12, 2013
    Last edited: Mar 8, 2013

    chattahoochee macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2012
    Location:
    Palmetto Florida
    #1
    From what I gather is: when using "Bootcamp" I have to install a "Full" copy of Windows OS (Windows 7) + reinstalling Snow Leopard OS X 10.6.8. This becomes very expensive with Windows 7 costing $90.00. Is there another way, all I want is some of the software i have i.e., "Sonic MyDVD Studio", "Photosuite", "Photo Explosion" as an example. This software will not download onto my MacBook. Are most software programs designed for Windows only ?
     
  2. simsaladimbamba

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2010
    Location:
    located
    #2
    No, if you have a Mac, it already comes with Mac OS X installed, unless you get a used one and the seller did remove the OS and did not provide any restore media.
    But if a used Mac comes with Mac OS X preinstalled (in most cases it does), then there is no need to reinstall Mac OS X if you use Boot Camp Assistant to install Windows on a new partition, unless the installation gets botched up, which can be circumvented (the reinstallation) by using a bootable backup created via CarbonCopyCloner or SuperDuper! and an external HDD*.

    That is how it works, unless you are a student or academic employee and can get your hands on a cheaper or free copy via your university/college.
    Or you torrent it.

    If that software is Windows only, you need Windows (either via Boot Camp or as virtual machine (VM).
    Booting Windows on the Mac

    You could also take a look at WineBottler, which makes it possible to run some Windows applications within Mac OS X without the need for Windows, but it is not approved for every Windows application and can prove quite cumbersome and problematic.

    There is a difference between download and install. A download is to connect your Mac to a website on the internet (or server) and select a file, which then gets copied to your Mac's internal or external storage device.
    An install is the process of using that copied / downloaded file to copy all the relevant files into the appropriate folders / directories either automatically or manually. With many Mac OS X applications it does suffice to just copy the application into the Applications folder, but some applications do need an installer.

    That I do not know, but it is safe to assume, that more applications are available for Windows than there are for Mac OS X. But in my experience is, that most Mac OS X applications are better designed and written than Windows applications anyway.
    For all my digital content creation needs I can live with Mac OS X applications, maybe look for Mac OS X alternatives to the Windows only applications.


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  3. chattahoochee thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2012
    Location:
    Palmetto Florida
    #3
    I note some of the software I mentioned shows "Free" downloads for Mac. Anytime I see: "Free" I get suspicious. Question: can there be any problems with such a download ? My recently purchased "Snow Leopard 10.6.8 is scheduled to arrive the 16th, I may try these downloads on the current OS which is the same version. I am reinstalling the OS due to unexplained problems with the current OS.
     
  4. simsaladimbamba

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2010
    Location:
    located
    #4
    Depends on where you download from and what exact applications you mean. Many Mac OS X applications are free or donationware, many are also not free.

    Maybe link to the applications and we can see, if it is just a scam or the real deal.
    If you download from MacUpdate or CNET or the actual developer's homepage, then you do not need to be suspicious.
     

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