Bootcamp Vs. Parallels; FOR Gaming???

Discussion in 'Windows, Linux & Others on the Mac' started by Razzz, Jul 18, 2012.

  1. Razzz macrumors member

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2011
    #1
    I was wondering which is better for running games on my new rMBP ? parallels or bootcamp? is there any bottleneck from using a virtualization program like parallels, or is the hassle to have to restart to run bootcamp just too much?

    BTW, does anyone know if a new parallels will come out for windows 8? ( aka parallels 8?) also since Microsoft announced that windows 8 will be a 40$ upgrade does that mean if I'm gonna run windows via parallels that it will only cost me 40$ instead of the current 150$ for windows 7??? That is if i wait for windows 8???

    Any help is welcome, Thanks!
     
  2. golf1410 macrumors 6502a

    golf1410

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    San Francisco, CA
    #2
    Get Powerful Desktop PC like Alienware is better.
     
  3. thomaskc macrumors 6502

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    Aug 19, 2010
    #3
    bootcamp, as it runs windows natively and not in a virtual machine.
     
  4. NMF macrumors 6502a

    NMF

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2011
    #4
    Bootcamp, hands down. Just try and play any graphically intensive game in Parallels and see how you like it. It's absolutely miserable.

    Bootcamp on the other hand is like having a native PC, it's excellent.
     
  5. jcpb macrumors 6502a

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    #5
    How do you carry your Alienware desktop on a plane?
     
  6. golf1410 macrumors 6502a

    golf1410

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    #6
    Laptop will not satify you as Desktop does in term of gaming experince. In fact, it is like killing your laptop, battery and fans slowly with hard core game graphic and heat. That is why cooler master still exist on these days.
     
  7. ChrisA macrumors G4

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    Location:
    Redondo Beach, California
    #7
    What a waste of a MacBook. You could have bought a $400 PC notebook at Wallmart. Or an xbox.

    Of cource Windows will run best if you re-boot into Windows. But given enough RAM (I'd say at least 8GB) a virtual PC will work. But why not VMware's "Fusion or Oracle's "virtual box" The latter is free. Try that first before you pay for Parallels or Fusion
    https://www.virtualbox.org/
     
  8. NMF macrumors 6502a

    NMF

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2011
    #8
    Who says gaming is the only reason he bought the MacBook? I use Macs for many reasons -- none of them gaming -- but I still make sure to always have a system that is at least capable of playing games at acceptable settings (read: high settings + 720p + 30fps min). You will not get that performance in a virtual machine. Not with real games.
     
  9. jcpb macrumors 6502a

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    #9
    You are not making any sense. How do you bring your Alienware desktop on the road? It's heavy, it has no batteries, it has too much bling, and it doesn't run OS X. Oh, and it's a Dell.

    To the OP: bootcamp for playing games, run as VM for anything other than games.
     
  10. golf1410 macrumors 6502a

    golf1410

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    Location:
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    #10
    We all know that OS X is not for gamers. I am trying to give the best advice and last long your laptop. Bootcamp will definately heat up more than OSX.

    The heat obviously reduces the CPU, GPU, litiumion battery and circiut components lifespan.
    Electrons in one transistor are not supposed to be able to reach other transistors in normal circumstances, but according to the principle of quantum tunnelling, an electron can actually escape from an infinitely deep energy well; it just does not happen that often. A transistor is made up of positively and negatively doped silicon around un-doped silicon. Every now and again, through chance alone, an electron can tunnel away from the conductive silicon keeping it in place. Usually it will only burrow in a couple of atoms and then return, though sometimes it can travel into another adjacent transistor. This does not normally cause a problem, because you need a lot of stray electrons to cause an error in how the gate is read. The problems start to occur when an electron attaches itself to one of the silicon atoms in the un-doped section of the silicon, or knocks another electron out of its orbit. This is known as silicon degradation, and over time, usually measured in years, a path is formed by the damage caused by these tunnelling electrons between two gates. Electrons can then flow across the junction freely, causing it to malfunction, and the value be misread by the computer, resulting in an error.

    The more energy an electron has, the more likely it is to tunnel, which is why if your CPU is running hot, or has a considerably higher voltage going through it, electrons can tunnel through far more easily. All CPU’s are built so that there is an inbuilt resistance to quantum tunnelling for an extended period of time, but when you overclock your CPU, that period is reduced.

    If chips got heat too much, you can actually physically destroy the silicon lattice of gates within a processor.


    Alienware is high end computer for gamers. It is a good choice to go when you think of one except you have knowledge to assemble computer parts from scratch like mine.

    [​IMG]
     
  11. jcpb macrumors 6502a

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    #11
    In which case the classic PC fanboy message boils down to: "wanna game? buy a PC desktop."

    No, I don't buy that line, even if I can agree that OS X is not intended for gamers.
    They do the same thing to desktops.
    Alienware? Try a Clevo.
     
  12. golf1410 macrumors 6502a

    golf1410

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    #12
    Games do support windows OS more than OSX. That's the fact. I am not Windows fan boys. In fact, PC stands for personal computer including Apple computers.
    Desktops have more cooling system options than laptop. Liquid cooling system is the way to go. Like I said, the brand doesn't matter. But when you think of one for the beginners who doesn't know things much about computer. Alienware is fine with affordable price with complete desktop product. Clevo is a option too when you can afford more money.

    brands I do care are brands of manufacture parts like asus, gigabyte, corsair, etc and assemble them by myself from ground up is the best option make a desktop the most customizable with reason price and put the best cooling system in there. Moreover, desktop case structure give you better airflow and plenty of space to add up things in the future.
     

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