Booting from external HD

Discussion in 'macOS' started by nickarmadillo, Feb 5, 2009.

  1. nickarmadillo macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2003
    Location:
    St. Louis, MO
    #1
    I just bought a new 320 gig 7200RPM hard drive for my Macbook pro to replace its internal drive. However, I seem to have lost my Leopard disks. I believe they are at home, but I am not at school and would not be able to return for them for a while. Is there any way that I can create a bootable image of my system and transfer it over to an external hard drive, put in the new drive, boot from the external, and then transfer the system image back to the new internal? How might I do so?
     
  2. MrM macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2008
    Location:
    California
    #2
    I know that doing a straight drag/drop never worked for me. The only thing I could think of is to create a disk image of the drive via Disk Utility. I do not know if that would work for sure (can someone confirm for me?) but in theory it would.
     
  3. plinden macrumors 68040

    plinden

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2004
  4. nickarmadillo thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2003
    Location:
    St. Louis, MO
    #4
    I've seen some of the other posts, but find them somewhat confusing. From what I've gathered you need to:
    1 connect the external hard drive
    2 create a disk image of the internal drive onto the external using SuperDuper
    3 remove the old internal drive and replace it with a new drive
    4 boot from the external drive and then reformat the new internal
    5 transfer the information from the external back onto the internal

    My questions are:
    How would I boot from the external drive?
    How would I format the new internal drive?
    How would I transfer the information from the external to the new internal so that I could boot from the new internal?
     
  5. feuerschlange macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2008
    #5
    1. hold the "option key" while booting your mac and you are presented a boot disk selection. Choose the external hdd, you just made a bootable clone with SuperDuper.
    2. partition it to your liking and format it with one partition at least the size or bigger, than your cloned partition, you want to play over from your SuperDuper clone.
    3. With SuperDuper - do exactly the same "cloning", you did in the first place and your done.

    Go to the SuperDuper website. There you will find very detailed tutorials, how to use SuperDuper, to do just that.

    If a Bootcamp Windows partition is involved, it gets a bit more complicated and involves a second software (winclone, if I remember correctly, I used for my backups of old Windows partitions).

    edit: one last but essential word: Always have at least a second backup of what you are experimenting with, in the case, you screw up completely. You never know - one second, you think all is under control and You have the word - the next split second things go terribly wrong. Always have a 2nd tested and working backup of your important data - always!
     
  6. miles01110 macrumors Core

    miles01110

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    Jul 24, 2006
    Location:
    The Ivory Tower (I'm not coming down)
  7. John T macrumors 68020

    John T

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2006
    Location:
    UK.
    #7
    Personally, I've found Superduper to be the easiest in creating a bootable copy of your HD to an external drive.
     
  8. psingh01 macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2004
    #8
    I'd like to know how your upgrade went. I have the same machine and am considering a hard drive upgrade as well. Between my itunes library and several vmware images that I use I barely have any space left.
     
  9. claimed4all macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2008
    #9
    Agree with this, mostly because it just works and it is free.
     
  10. feuerschlange macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2008
    #10
    SuperDuper "... just works and it is free." too.

    And it is even so good, that you can spend very little money on a license and have intelligent synchronizing too.

    It takes me 10 minutes while having a coffee in the morning and surfing the internet for news, to hook up my external backup hdd, start SuperDuper and run the synchronization.

    When I finish my coffee, I have an exact clone of my main harddrive and do not worry about a lost notebook during the day.

    EDIT: I forgot: of course, the clone is fully bootable and indistinguishable from my main drive, after I booted it up via Firewire - no fuss in rebuilding, reinstalling, reconfiguring as in ancient Windows times.
     
  11. miles01110 macrumors Core

    miles01110

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2006
    Location:
    The Ivory Tower (I'm not coming down)
    #11
    Either one works, I use SuperDuper (with a license) just because if I had a problem I'd imagine that paid employees would be more likely to respond than whoever developed CCC.

    Note that the demo of SuperDuper will do the basic job, but if you ever want to run scheduled backups you'll have to wipe the drive and start all over again (which could take hours). If you buy it, the program will do a "smart update" which just goes through and updates the changes instead of re-imaging the entire drive.
     

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