Bose Pushes Noise-Cancellation Smarts in Wireless Headphones Market

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Wireless bluetooth headphones have been gaining traction over the past few years as potentially reliable replacements to the traditional wired headsets offered with most smartphones.

Interest has increased only further since rumors began suggesting that Apple's upcoming iPhone 7 may feature a thinner body with no headphone jack, leaving users to rely on the Lightning port and Bluetooth as ways to connect to the device.

Meanwhile, other rumors suggest Apple could use new audio technology in the iPhone 7 to improve noise cancellation and even extend the feature to a new set of Apple-branded wireless headphones.

Amid all the Apple speculation, the company best known for inventing premium noise cancellation technology - Bose - today unveiled a new wireless version of its flagship QuietComfort headphones, along with three other potential wireless options for the future iPhone 7 user.
Priced at $350 and available in black or silver, the QuietComfort 35 headphones feature the same around-ear design as previous wired QC cans and Bose claims they offer similar audio quality to its QC25 headphones.

The Verge says "they do a great job of making it feel like you're alone with whatever's playing through them", and that typical everyday ambient noise -- subway stations, busy city streets, and so on -- are "turned down to a whisper" by the QC35s.

Bose also announced today an all-new pair of noise-cancelling earbuds called the QuietControl 30s, which have a black plastic band that wraps around the back of the neck. The level of noise cancellation in the QuietControl 30s can be adjusted using either the Bose mobile app or via the physical controls on the buds. The QuietControl 30s cost $300 and will be available in September.
Bose has used significantly enhanced dual microphones in both products which the company claims do a better job of picking up the user's voice while effectively filtering out background noise.

Finally, Bose also today introduced two new models of fitness-oriented Bluetooth earbuds, the SoundSport Wireless ($149) and SoundSport Wireless Pulse ($199). Both models are water and sweat resistant, while the latter include a built-in heart-rate monitor inside the earbuds (similar to offerings from the likes of Samsung and Jabra), but neither models have Bose's patented noise cancellation smarts.

Alternatively, if you're more interested in the potential benefits and drawbacks of using Lightning headphones with an iPhone with no headphone jack, be sure to check out MacRumors' video on the subject.

Article Link: Bose Pushes Noise-Cancellation Smarts in Wireless Headphones Market
 

maflynn

Moderator
Staff member
May 3, 2009
65,640
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Boston
Seems a bit pricey for me (for the headphones), but then Bose was always expensive.
 

foobarbaz

macrumors 6502a
Nov 29, 2007
523
482
Finally! I've been waiting for the QC series to go wireless. They need batteries for the noise cancellation anyway, so it seemed especially pointless for them to still use cables.
 
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speedyyellow

macrumors member
May 22, 2015
84
24
Cambs/London
I'm sure there is going to be some wireless audio improvements coming to the iPhone 7 to justify dropping the headphone jack, so despite being interested in getting some new headphones I feel like now is totally not the time to be dropping a decent chunk of money on a new pair of headphones.
 
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Andy hates Candy

macrumors newbie
Jun 6, 2016
7
17



Wireless bluetooth headphones have been gaining traction over the past few years as potentially reliable replacements to the traditional wired headsets offered with most smartphones.

Interest has increased only further since rumors began suggesting that Apple's upcoming iPhone 7 may feature a thinner body with no headphone jack, leaving users to rely on the Lightning port and Bluetooth as ways to connect to the device.

Meanwhile, other rumors suggest Apple could use new audio technology in the iPhone 7 to improve noise cancellation and even extend the feature to a new set of Apple-branded wireless headphones.

Amid all the Apple speculation, the company best known for inventing premium noise cancellation technology - Bose - today unveiled a new wireless version of its flagship QuietComfort headphones, along with three other potential wireless options for the future iPhone 7 user.
Priced at $350 and available in black or silver, the QuietComfort 35 headphones feature the same around-ear design as previous wired QC cans and Bose claims they offer similar audio quality to its QC25 headphones.

The Verge says "they do a great job of making it feel like you're alone with whatever's playing through them", and that typical everyday ambient noise -- subway stations, busy city streets, and so on -- are "turned down to a whisper" by the QC35s.

Bose also announced today an all-new pair of noise-cancelling earbuds called the QuietControl 30s, which have a black plastic band that wraps around the back of the neck. The level of noise cancellation in the QuietControl 30s can be adjusted using either the Bose mobile app or via the physical controls on the buds. The QuietControl 30s cost $300 and will be available in September.
Bose has used significantly enhanced dual microphones in both products which the company claims do a better job of picking up the user's voice while effectively filtering out background noise.

Finally, Bose also today introduced two new models of fitness-oriented Bluetooth earbuds, the SoundSport Wireless ($149) and SoundSport Wireless Pulse ($199). Both models are water and sweat resistant, while the latter include a built-in heart-rate monitor inside the earbuds (similar to offerings from the likes of Samsung and Jabra), but neither models have Bose's patented noise cancellation smarts.

Alternatively, if you're more interested in the potential benefits and drawbacks of using Lightning headphones with an iPhone with no headphone jack, be sure to check out MacRumors' video on the subject.

Article Link: Bose Pushes Noise-Cancellation Smarts in Wireless Headphones Market
Bose is over



Wireless bluetooth headphones have been gaining traction over the past few years as potentially reliable replacements to the traditional wired headsets offered with most smartphones.

Interest has increased only further since rumors began suggesting that Apple's upcoming iPhone 7 may feature a thinner body with no headphone jack, leaving users to rely on the Lightning port and Bluetooth as ways to connect to the device.

Meanwhile, other rumors suggest Apple could use new audio technology in the iPhone 7 to improve noise cancellation and even extend the feature to a new set of Apple-branded wireless headphones.

Amid all the Apple speculation, the company best known for inventing premium noise cancellation technology - Bose - today unveiled a new wireless version of its flagship QuietComfort headphones, along with three other potential wireless options for the future iPhone 7 user.
Priced at $350 and available in black or silver, the QuietComfort 35 headphones feature the same around-ear design as previous wired QC cans and Bose claims they offer similar audio quality to its QC25 headphones.

The Verge says "they do a great job of making it feel like you're alone with whatever's playing through them", and that typical everyday ambient noise -- subway stations, busy city streets, and so on -- are "turned down to a whisper" by the QC35s.

Bose also announced today an all-new pair of noise-cancelling earbuds called the QuietControl 30s, which have a black plastic band that wraps around the back of the neck. The level of noise cancellation in the QuietControl 30s can be adjusted using either the Bose mobile app or via the physical controls on the buds. The QuietControl 30s cost $300 and will be available in September.
Bose has used significantly enhanced dual microphones in both products which the company claims do a better job of picking up the user's voice while effectively filtering out background noise.

Finally, Bose also today introduced two new models of fitness-oriented Bluetooth earbuds, the SoundSport Wireless ($149) and SoundSport Wireless Pulse ($199). Both models are water and sweat resistant, while the latter include a built-in heart-rate monitor inside the earbuds (similar to offerings from the likes of Samsung and Jabra), but neither models have Bose's patented noise cancellation smarts.

Alternatively, if you're more interested in the potential benefits and drawbacks of using Lightning headphones with an iPhone with no headphone jack, be sure to check out MacRumors' video on the subject.

Article Link: Bose Pushes Noise-Cancellation Smarts in Wireless Headphones Market
Bose-Is-Overpriced-Junk-Comments are coming in 3 … 2 … 1
 

cerberusss

macrumors 6502a
Aug 25, 2013
913
345
The Netherlands
I've worked at a client where the office consisted of a large open space with ~30 desks. I didn't like it much, very hard to focus on coding (I'm an iOS developer). At the end of the day, I was more tired than usual.

Do people have experience with these noise canceling headphones? How well do these filter out office noise?
 

Andy hates Candy

macrumors newbie
Jun 6, 2016
7
17
I've worked at a client where the office consisted of a large open space with ~30 desks. I didn't like it much, very hard to focus on coding (I'm an iOS developer). At the end of the day, I was more tired than usual.

Do people have experience with these noise canceling headphones? How well do these filter out office noise?
they filter constant "noise" pretty good. I have the qc 30 … at the beginning I had some little ear aches, but my ears got used to it. amazing sound, very good noise canceling. someone talks to you, you hear that. the catch: get's hot in the summer ;)
 

maflynn

Moderator
Staff member
May 3, 2009
65,640
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Boston
Bose-Is-Overpriced-Junk-Comments are coming in 3 … 2 … 1
You evidently missed this post ;)

They have a great marketing team that has convinced people to buy subpar speakers for ridiculous prices.

Their internal motto is better sound through marketing.
I wouldn't say they're junk, but I will say they are over priced given the quality of sound
 

Tycho24

Suspended
Aug 29, 2014
2,071
1,393
Florida
They have a great marketing team that has convinced people to buy subpar speakers for ridiculous prices.

Their internal motto is better sound through marketing.
Hear hear!!!
Omg, the "Bose heads" are a sad lot.
I wonder what they would think of they heard some REAL stereo equipment??!!
 

Abazigal

macrumors G5
Jul 18, 2011
12,206
10,071
Singapore
They have a great marketing team that has convinced people to buy subpar speakers for ridiculous prices.

Their internal motto is better sound through marketing.
I wouldn't be so harsh.

My understanding of Bose is that their noise cancelling tech is good, but that's pretty much about it. You get their headphones if you really need the noise cancelling portion (eg: you are a frequent flier) but otherwise, there are better deals for the money.

It's a niche market, but a legitimate one.
 

Tycho24

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Aug 29, 2014
2,071
1,393
Florida
Well, I only use Bose. To me, they sound & look good. Great Highs, Great Lows. That is important to me. And isn't that everything? Happy customers?
With all due respect...
You are the EXACT "happy" customer they love most... an uninformed one.
As you say: you "only use Bose"; so you don't know any better. Now, the truth of the headphone industry, sadly is that- 90% of us have only ever heard very, very, very crappy headphones (what came with our Walkman, what came with our iPod, etc.), so when you hear a custom engineered headphone for the 1st time (and for most, yes... it was a Bose), of course you are stunned- you think: "I had no idea music could sound this good!" & assume that, because it's so much better than the garbage sound that you've heard before- it must be the best. "What was the price?" "Oh, well I guess that's what good sound costs." & that's the end of it..... but, to ANY who have scratched the surface a teeny bit more- they have universally recognized that there are sooooooooo many better choices, that owning Bose is a bit of an embarrassment, as generally speaking- you can get double the sound quality for half the price. Granted- I am a bit of an audiophile (spend as much time on the forums at Head-Fi.org as I do here, etc.), but I can assure you that even to a completely untrained ear- any real headphone in the $350 dollar range would be SO far beyond these toys, it's not even funny.
I am NOT wanting to downplay your opinion though....
I truly believe that "you catch more bees with honey than vinegar" & honestly, I'd love to see you get an ugly old classic set of Grados, or that new bluetooth Urbanite headset by Sennheiser, or some nice in-ears by Etymotic or Shure..... & treat your ears to the WONDROUS audiophonic joy that your mediocre Bose have been robbing them of.
In the end- if you do not.... yes, your Bose are still miles better than most will ever bother experiencing & will "do fine", but (trust me!) if you DO heed my advice & try something else, you'll see that it is yet another equal leap in quality, like going from your Apple earbuds to your Bose... I promise! =)
 

sguser

macrumors regular
Aug 12, 2010
115
102
I owned QC15 and now use QC20. These headphone worth every dollar to people who fly often. I'll give Qc30 a try. I assume those will require a BT transmitter in order to be used with inflight entertainment systems?!
 

Romf

macrumors 6502
Jun 11, 2011
257
69
Paris, France
that new bluetooth Urbanite headset by Sennheiser
As I said: no noise reduction.

I agree again with what you wrote, but the "wireless with GOOD noise reduction" market is very poor, and Bose is in that case one of the best choice
[doublepost=1465215209][/doublepost]
I owned QC15 and now use QC20. These headphone worth every dollar to people who fly often. I'll give Qc30 a try. I assume those will require a BT transmitter in order to be used with inflight entertainment systems?!
I think it includes a cable and a plane adapter - and although they are Bluetooth, you can also use wired if you prefer/need
 

BMcCoy

macrumors 68000
Jun 24, 2010
1,586
3,119
This is interesting..

Yes, I know, Bose are generally not the best headphones (or other audio equipment) by a long way.
(A bit like Beats really..)

HOWEVER, they are absolutely the best in-flight noise-reduction headphones available, by miles..
Spot regular flyers on any aircraft, and Bose headphones will be worn.
Have a skim read through any frequent flyer forum, and Bose will always be the recommended NR headphones.

So to those criticizing Bose, be aware that these are one product where Bose DO lead the market.
 

JeffyTheQuik

macrumors 68020
Aug 27, 2014
2,468
2,404
Charleston, SC and Everett, WA
In defense of Bose, I purchased 2 Aviation Headsets (the first model, not the A20's) off of Craigslist, and they were packaged in 2 ziplock bags with the power supply module (with the volume and the on/off switch) without the case. Essentially, the power distribution board, which goes between the headset and the aircraft was just the boards (1 ea for the two headsets).

I called Bose product support, and the person answered on the second ring, and I told him the situation, and asked if they had any parts for these laying around. Of course, the answer was "no", since these have not been sold for 20 years, but I did ask about the schematics (I'm an electronic engineer, so this would help), and he sent them to me via e-mail. I appreciate that the customer service would be so willing to help me on a set of headphones that have been out of production for 20 years, and in that respect, there was nothing to be gained from them doing this.

I did a rudimentary hookup of the headsets to my Mac (I have a Flight Sounds X Aviation headset to USB adapter - Recommended!), and making a phone call to my wife, they work! I haven't tried the ANR, since I didn't have the 12V to put to it, yet. I'll look around my junk boxes for an old adapter.

So, for $25 each, plus about $100 in parts (battery, going to use one of those car starter batteries, since they will put out 12 volts, enclosure, and plugs), I have two aviation headsets with ANR. Normal cost for one cheap headset - $125.

I am grateful for Bose and their customer service for making getting into flying a little less expensive than it could have been. Yes, Bose made it cheaper for me to fly!
 

Tycho24

Suspended
Aug 29, 2014
2,071
1,393
Florida
As I said: no noise reduction.

I agree again with what you wrote, but the "wireless with GOOD noise reduction" market is very poor, and Bose is in that case one of the best choice
[doublepost=1465215209][/doublepost]
I think it includes a cable and a plane adapter - and although they are Bluetooth, you can also use wired if you prefer/need
I have a pair of the Seinheiser Momentum on-ears (in green....... so sexy!)
Lol, at any rate- I believe the Momentum 2.0 Wireless have noise reduction.
 

H2SO4

macrumors 601
Nov 4, 2008
4,417
4,107
They have a great marketing team that has convinced people to buy subpar speakers for ridiculous prices.

Their internal motto is better sound through marketing.
Same could be said of Apple.
Don’t like wireless headphones. The paranoia in me means I always use a landline and wired connections where possible. I’d by wireless headphones but, and maybe here’s a kickstarter for you, the headphones had a few gigs of onboard storage and you could use a companion app to copy music from your phone.