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Audio technology company Bose this week announced a new wireless Bluetooth speaker aimed at creating a do-it-yourself workflow for kids interested in electronics. Called the BOSEbuild Speaker Cube, the $150 kit connects with a companion Bose app, giving users a step-by-step set of instructions to build a fully functioning Bluetooth speaker, along with other experiments and activities (via TechCrunch).

bosebuild-speakers-800x318.jpg

Once users put the focus on assembling the speaker, no extra tools are required in the process since Bose ships all the necessary equipment in the kit. There are customization options as well, with different colored lighting effects and "swappable silhouette covers" to add a personal touch to the finished speaker.
This is more than just a speaker - it's a journey. Starting from the very basic elements of sound and speakers, your child will build a deeper understanding as they move toward assembling their Speaker Cube. At every step, exploration is encouraged and curiosity is rewarded.

Everything about the BOSEbuild Speaker Cube is carefully designed with kids in mind. The parts are rugged and resilient, and the app-driven construction steps are clear and easy to follow. Cables and connectors are big, bright, and easy to handle. Even the circuit board is clearly labeled.
The Speaker Cube is just the first in the BOSEbuild line, which the company hopes will help spark the curiosity of its younger users through hands-on experiences and exploration. According to Bose, "when kids build something with their own hands and experience it with their own senses, it does more than just teach - it inspires."


While hardware-focused, the new BOSEbuild products are similar to Apple's upcoming app, Swift Playgrounds, which will present a visual, entertaining angle on teaching kids how to code. Currently available in the iOS 10 beta, the final version of Swift Playgrounds will launch for free in the App Store this fall.

Those interested can purchase the Speaker Cube on Bose's website for $149.00. Although both an iOS and Android device can be used for music playback once the speaker is functioning, the educational discovery and build experience is only available via an iOS app on any iPhone, iPod touch or iPad running iOS 8 or newer, with the exception of the iPad 2.

Article Link: 'BOSEbuild Speaker Cube' Teaches Kids How to Build Their Own Bluetooth Speaker
 

Mactendo

macrumors 68000
Oct 3, 2012
1,967
2,044
Cool :D 80's are back. But back in 80's it would look nicer and cost less. I was inspired at first but after seeing what the finished product looks like... No, thanks. Could be much better, shame on BOSE.
But the idea of such kit is great, glad to see it's being resurrected.
 
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neuropsychguy

macrumors 68000
Sep 29, 2008
1,539
2,892
Their home speakers system has lasted me 23 years. Excellent quality. My Wave system (8 years old) I still believe is unmatched and is works perfect.

The Bluetooth speaker a friend of mine also has seems super robust.

Don't know about the headphones though
Bose makes great products. They're just priced higher than similar quality (some with better acoustics) systems from other manufacturers. It's like Beats - the quality is good, it's just the quality / price ratio is lower than other options.
 
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WinstonRumfoord

macrumors 6502
Mar 27, 2014
458
1,142
Except those kids are already working Calculus equations at the same age while our kids are learning how to "feel" about special social justice issues.

We are so done lol.

Kind of a false equivalency, but I get your point and somewhat agree.

Anyways, this kit sounds awesome and I would have loved to find this under the tree 20 years ago!
 
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johnhurley

macrumors 6502a
Aug 29, 2011
777
56
Except those kids are already working Calculus equations at the same age while our kids are learning how to "feel" about special social justice issues.

We are so done lol.

I believe the point being made is that China ( and Bose and Apple etc ) are exploiting young children in factories.

My children did more than fine at calculus.
 
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bookwormsy

macrumors 6502
Jul 7, 2010
281
172
This is pretty slick! I might pick one up just to play around with, assuming the sound quality is decent.
 
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69Mustang

macrumors 604
Jan 7, 2014
7,869
15,006
In between a rock and a hard place
This is pretty slick! I might pick one up just to play around with, assuming the sound quality is decent.
It's held together by plastic clips and meant to be assembled and disassembled multiple times. Pretty safe to say the sound quality is going to reflect that. I really don't think the purpose of the product is sound quality. More of learning tool. But you're right, it's pretty slick. If you have interest, Amazon has an entire section of STEM toys like this cube: https://www.amazon.com/STEM-Toys-Store/b?ie=UTF8&node=11021999011

I picked up this for my 10 year old daughter for a summer project for us to do together.
51w%2BREYhVcL.jpg
 
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Glassed Silver

macrumors 68020
Mar 10, 2007
2,096
2,564
Kassel, Germany
Except those kids are already working Calculus equations at the same age while our kids are learning how to "feel" about special social justice issues.

We are so done lol.
Yes we are so done, but not necessarily because of the people who are worrying about these issues, but the ones that created them.

Namely, wasn't exactly the generation OUR GENERATIONS raise atm.
So, if you think our youth is doomed, doubt it's because they are learning about the ****ed up **** the proceeding generations did.

If however you feel it's an unnecessary age to learn about these issues, well socializing and all the components to it like prejudice are most deeply formed and learnt in these young ages, so if you want the message to stick, gotta do it early.
There's a reason why your racist aunt isn't going to change anytime soon and why the same rotten ideas will forever spread in our society, almost no matter what we do.

Glassed Silver:mac
 
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NT1440

Contributor
May 18, 2008
12,806
16,643
Uh....so why should schools spent $150 on this kit when you can create your own speakers (and learn a lot more) for under $20 with many other DIY kits?
 
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Aston441

macrumors 68000
Sep 16, 2014
1,649
2,377
Yes we are so done, but not necessarily because of the people who are worrying about these issues, but the ones that created them.

Namely, wasn't exactly the generation OUR GENERATIONS raise atm.
So, if you think our youth is doomed, doubt it's because they are learning about the ****ed up **** the proceeding generations did.

If however you feel it's an unnecessary age to learn about these issues, well socializing and all the components to it like prejudice are most deeply formed and learnt in these young ages, so if you want the message to stick, gotta do it early.
There's a reason why your racist aunt isn't going to change anytime soon and why the same rotten ideas will forever spread in our society, almost no matter what we do.

Glassed Silver:mac


I'm guessing that working through differential equations wasn't really a big part of your education?
 
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GeneralChang

macrumors 68000
Dec 2, 2013
1,565
1,283
Their home speakers system has lasted me 23 years. Excellent quality. My Wave system (8 years old) I still believe is unmatched and is works perfect.

The Bluetooth speaker a friend of mine also has seems super robust.

Don't know about the headphones though
It's a driver thing. I've never seen a whole Bose system go to pot, but I have seen their drivers blow and in retrospect they feel like they were made from tissue paper. That's just in my experience which really is just limited to headphones. All the other Bose systems I've used in passing had drivers made by another company and seemed perfectly fine, if maybe a touch overpriced.
[doublepost=1467387261][/doublepost]
It's held together by plastic clips and meant to be assembled and disassembled multiple times. Pretty safe to say the sound quality is going to reflect that. I really don't think the purpose of the product is sound quality. More of learning tool. But you're right, it's pretty slick. If you have interest, Amazon has an entire section of STEM toys like this cube: https://www.amazon.com/STEM-Toys-Store/b?ie=UTF8&node=11021999011

I picked up this for my 10 year old daughter for a summer project for us to do together.
51w%2BREYhVcL.jpg
Oh man, that is fantastic.
 
Comment

jmgregory1

macrumors 68030
I believe there is a market for more things like this, similar to what I grew up playing with - the Radio Shack / Science Fair 75 in 1 electronic kit. It's what drove my idea for an all-electronic solid state method for storing and playback of music - back in the mid to late '70's. I wish I would have stuck to experimenting with it more (storing loops of sound), because this idea ended up becoming the iPod and other MP3 players.

I had actually envisaged a time when we would skip using speakers to hear music and tie electronics directly into our brains - this back when I was around 10 years old. For me, it was an idea born more out of my own issues with constant ear infections and reduced hearing because of that. Obviously we haven't gotten quite that far yet (for general population use), but these ideas were all born out of my playing with the 75 in 1 kit, so it clearly had a positive effect on me.

This Bose kit looks far too simple to me. Instead of just being about assembling and controlling a very basic bt speaker, they should give kids the ability to actually play with and test acoustics of the speaker box, with different baffle configurations and materials, different port options, box sizes, etc. It would be a great combination of physics-based and electronics learning potential.
 
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federico0212

macrumors newbie
Apr 12, 2015
27
37
Bose makes great products. They're just priced higher than similar quality (some with better acoustics) systems from other manufacturers. It's like Beats - the quality is good, it's just the quality / price ratio is lower than other options.

Not even close, beats are made with awfully low quality materials.
Their sound quality is divisive, so I won't bring it up. But the fact is, the over head joints are plastic, the pads are glued with cheap glue, they flake, and the headphones are famous for snapping in half when putting them on slightly stretched.
They fatigue, they aren't meant to last. Bose and others use metal, which obviously can withstand stretching.
 
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Aston441

macrumors 68000
Sep 16, 2014
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I'm currently enjoying higher education and therefore went through my fair amount of maths during my high school years.

Are you suggesting you can only learn one thing or the other?

Glassed Silver:mac

I'm suggesting that the content of your post was suggesting that your education time was full of feels with less time spent on practical skills.

I know people that grew up in China. They don't spend time on feels there.
[doublepost=1467393443][/doublepost]
I believe there is a market for more things like this, similar to what I grew up playing with - the Radio Shack / Science Fair 75 in 1 electronic kit. It's what drove my idea for an all-electronic solid state method for storing and playback of music - back in the mid to late '70's. I wish I would have stuck to experimenting with it more (storing loops of sound), because this idea ended up becoming the iPod and other MP3 players.

I had actually envisaged a time when we would skip using speakers to hear music and tie electronics directly into our brains - this back when I was around 10 years old. For me, it was an idea born more out of my own issues with constant ear infections and reduced hearing because of that. Obviously we haven't gotten quite that far yet (for general population use), but these ideas were all born out of my playing with the 75 in 1 kit, so it clearly had a positive effect on me.

This Bose kit looks far too simple to me. Instead of just being about assembling and controlling a very basic bt speaker, they should give kids the ability to actually play with and test acoustics of the speaker box, with different baffle configurations and materials, different port options, box sizes, etc. It would be a great combination of physics-based and electronics learning potential.

I used to screen and etch my own boards and then solder in circuits I designed myself, as a kid, with stuff from RS.

It is a fact that teens and brighter preteens in China are doing that very thing, right now. Here in the USA, not so much any more.

They are kicking our butt for specific and obvious reasons. But at least we feel just and righteous about our decline, so there's that.
 
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