bought a macbook pro

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by rockjohnson, Apr 21, 2012.

  1. rockjohnson macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2012
    #1
    I just bought a macbook pro. 15.4 monitor with i7 processor. Bought it because I want to get into app development. Hopefully the transition will go smoothly. I have been a pc user since 95. I can only say why didn't i switch later. I have a few questions.

    Will i need a anti spyware or virus checker? Can i leave the laptop plugged in when not in use? Can i leave it on with the lid closed when not in use?
     
  2. east85 macrumors 65816

    east85

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2010
    #2
    You will not need anti-spyware or virus checking software.

    Please read the following guide regarding virus/malware on the Mac:
    http://guides.macrumors.com/Mac_Virus/Malware_FAQ

    The best way to keep your Mac clean is to not install any questionable software from questionable sources, add a password to your mac to prevent others from accessing it, and keep your Mac updated properly. You can update/check for updates manually by clicking the Apple icon in the upper left hand corner and selecting "software update".
     
  3. Interstella5555 macrumors 603

    Interstella5555

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2008
    #3
    No, Yes (though should use the battery at times, someone will be along in a second with a link) and....yes. Kind of confused about the last one, are there laptops that need shut down when closed?
     
  4. rockjohnson thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2012
    #4


    So i should let it use the battery from time to time? The last question is basically can i keep it turned on all the time. Whenever it isn't in use, close the lid.
     
  5. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #5
    No. Macs are not immune to malware, but no true viruses exist in the wild that can run on Mac OS X, and there never have been any since it was released over 10 years ago. The only malware in the wild that can affect Mac OS X is a handful of trojans, which can be easily avoided by practicing safe computing (see below). Also, Mac OS X Snow Leopard and Lion have anti-malware protection built in, further reducing the need for 3rd party antivirus apps.
    1. Make sure your built-in Mac firewall is enabled in System Preferences > Security > Firewall

    2. Uncheck "Open "safe" files after downloading" in Safari > Preferences > General

    3. Disable Java in your browser. (For Safari users, uncheck "Enable Java" in Safari > Preferences > Security.) This will protect you from malware that exploits Java in your browser, including the recent Flashback trojan. Leave this unchecked until you visit a trusted site that requires Java, then re-enable only for the duration of your visit to that site. (This is not to be confused with JavaScript, which you should leave enabled.)

    4. Change your DNS servers to OpenDNS servers by reading this.

    5. Be careful to only install software from trusted, reputable sites. Never install pirated software. If you're not sure about an app, ask in this forum before installing.

    6. Never let someone else have access to install anything on your Mac.

    7. Don't open files that you receive from unknown or untrusted sources.

    8. For added security, make sure all network, email, financial and other important passwords are long and complex, including upper and lower case letters, numbers and special characters.

    9. Always keep your Mac and application software updated. Use Software Update for your Mac software. For other software, it's safer to get updates from the developer's site or from the menu item "Check for updates", rather than installing from any notification window that pops up while you're surfing the web.
    That's all you need to do to keep your Mac completely free of any virus, trojan, spyware, keylogger, or other malware. You don't need any 3rd party software to keep your Mac secure.
    Yes. Run on battery when you need to and run on AC power when you can. Just don't run on AC power all the time, as your battery needs to be used to stay healthy. This should answer most, if not all, of your battery questions:
    When you close the lid, your MBP will automatically sleep. It's fine to do that. Many users run months at a time without ever shutting down or restarting.
     
  6. rockjohnson thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2012
    #6
    Thank you for that very informational post! I should have before i installed macscan.


     
  7. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #7
    Some have had problems uninstalling antivirus apps. The most effective method for complete app removal is manual deletion:
     
  8. haapy macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2012
    #8
    I recently sent my Mac mini for checking (on harddrive licking sound), got my Mac mini back now, been thinking if I should check if any spyware was installed when my Mac mini was away,

    done some digging,

    http://www.simplehelp.net/2008/06/15/how-to-scan-your-mac-for-spyware-malware-and-tracking-cookies/

    http://osxdaily.com/2010/06/01/spyware-on-the-mac/

    http://www.clamav.net/lang/en/
    http://www.clamxav.com/
    http://www.securemac.com/
    http://www.sophos.com/en-us/products/endpoint/small-business-solutions.aspx

    which anti spyware do you all recomend?
     
  9. macmale macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2012
    #9
    i use sophos just to be safe, its free and it does detect the nasties that are not supposed to be on macs. i would use it if i were you
     
  10. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #10
    Macs are not immune to malware, but no true viruses exist in the wild that can run on Mac OS X, and there never have been any since it was released over 10 years ago. The only malware in the wild that can affect Mac OS X is a handful of trojans, which can be easily avoided by practicing safe computing (see below). Also, Mac OS X Snow Leopard and Lion have anti-malware protection built in, further reducing the need for 3rd party antivirus apps.
    1. Make sure your built-in Mac firewall is enabled in System Preferences > Security > Firewall

    2. Uncheck "Open "safe" files after downloading" in Safari > Preferences > General

    3. Disable Java in your browser. (For Safari users, uncheck "Enable Java" in Safari > Preferences > Security.) This will protect you from malware that exploits Java in your browser, including the recent Flashback trojan. Leave this unchecked until you visit a trusted site that requires Java, then re-enable only for the duration of your visit to that site. (This is not to be confused with JavaScript, which you should leave enabled.)

    4. Change your DNS servers to OpenDNS servers by reading this.

    5. Be careful to only install software from trusted, reputable sites. Never install pirated software. If you're not sure about an app, ask in this forum before installing.

    6. Never let someone else have access to install anything on your Mac.

    7. Don't open files that you receive from unknown or untrusted sources.

    8. For added security, make sure all network, email, financial and other important passwords are long and complex, including upper and lower case letters, numbers and special characters.

    9. Always keep your Mac and application software updated. Use Software Update for your Mac software. For other software, it's safer to get updates from the developer's site or from the menu item "Check for updates", rather than installing from any notification window that pops up while you're surfing the web.
    That's all you need to do to keep your Mac completely free of any Mac OS X malware that has ever been released into the wild. You don't need any 3rd party software to keep your Mac secure.

    If you still want to run antivirus for some reason, ClamXav (which is free) is one of the best choices, since it isn't a resource hog, detects both Mac and Windows malware and doesn't run with elevated privileges.
    I recommend that you avoid using Sophos, as it could actually increase your Mac's vulnerability, as described here and here.
     

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