Brand new in box Apple Wireless Keyboard en Espanol??

Discussion in 'Buying Tips and Advice' started by windell79, Aug 23, 2007.

  1. windell79 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    May 19, 2007
    #1
    A local seller(CL) has a brand new in box(still sealed) Apple Wireless/bluetooth Keyboard en Espanol(western: mexico) for $20

    I'm english speaker and dont speak spanish and currently i have wired keyboard and wouldn't mind a bluetooth keyboard. to me $20 for a brand new one did not seem thats bad especilly if i could not notice a difference when using it. I asked him to send pics to compare US to Espanol keyboard and there was not much of a difference from what i saw.

    was wondering if I would notice a difference in typying?? has anyone who primary language is English has used a espanol apple keyboard? and if i should buy??
     
  2. ab2650 macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2007
    #2
    For most of your typing, you won't notice a huge difference. Much like if you stop in an internet cafe while traveling you shouldn't have too much trouble to peck out some emails.

    However, I would strongly recommend that you don't buy a western spanish keyboard unless you speak Spanish and are looking for access to more commonly used characters than in English (tildes, accents, punctuation). There's a reason they make both (available in the US market that is).

    My bilingual family typically selects US keyboards and makes do, even when typing in Spanish. I would think that you would run into some problems and saving the extra, what, $50, is short sighted.
     
  3. freshstart macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2007
    Location:
    Florida
    #3
    I have not used a Spanish keyboard, but I do speak Spanish. The only differences that I would expect to see are some allowance for the 4 extra letters in the alphabet (ch, ll, ñ, rr) and additional punctuation (accent mark, upside down exclamation point and upside down question mark). Spanish uses both the upside down and right side up exclamation and question marks.

    As you can see, three of the four letters can be typed on an English keyboard, and the fourth just needs a tilde (the little squiggly over the top), which already has a shortcut on the English keyboard. All of the punctuation also has shortcuts built in to the English keyboard as well. So, take a look at the photo you have to see if any of these differences create any extra keys on the Spanish keyboard.

    Hope this helps!
     
  4. freshstart macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2007
    Location:
    Florida
    #4
    I have not used a Spanish keyboard, but I do speak Spanish. The only differences that I would expect to see are some allowance for the 4 extra letters in the alphabet (ch, ll, ñ, rr) and additional punctuation (accent mark, upside down exclamation point and upside down question mark). Spanish uses both the upside down and right side up exclamation and question marks.

    As you can see, three of the four letters can be typed on an English keyboard, and the fourth just needs a tilde (the little squiggly over the top), which already has a shortcut on the English keyboard. All of the punctuation also has shortcuts built in to the English keyboard as well. So, take a look at the photo you have to see if any of these differences create any extra keys (rather than shortcuts) on the Spanish keyboard.

    Hope this helps!
     
  5. guifa macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2002
    Location:
    Auburn, AL
    #5
    rr is not a letter in the Spanish language. The Spanish keyboard has a separate key for Ñ. Don't forget that Spanish also uses different quotation marks, « », acute accents, and diæreses. As well, many Spanish keyboards are used in regions where Spanish isn't the only language spoken, and as such, it has several extra diacritical keys for grave, circumflex, and diæresis/umlaut accent marks.

    Several other keys are rearranged, namely that shift-, is a semicolon, and shift-. is a colon (which kind of makes sense, shift adds the extra dot). Also there is a ç, and several other punctuation characters are rearranged. The main difference that frustrates most English-speakers is that the left shift key is split in half to make room for another key.

    I've uploaded an image showing the Spanish keyboard normally (top left), with shift held down (bottom left), option held down (top right), and shift and option held down (bottom right). Note the on there, the shift and return keys look normally (for what reason I'm not sure, it's doing a poor job mimicking my keyboard), but there is a distinct shape to the shift and return keys.
     

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  6. freshstart macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2007
    Location:
    Florida
    #6
    I was surprised to see the post on "rr" not being a letter in the Spanish language. I majored in Spanish in college, and through all nine years of Spanish classes was taught the alphabet included those 4 extra letters.

    However, I did a little research after reading the above posting, and it seems that there is disagreement about which letters are officially in the Spanish alphabet. From about.com:

    It may interest you to know that not all authorities (or at least not all textbooks) agree on which letters make up the alphabet. Some lists don't include W (sometimes referred to as doble ve) and K, which exist almost exclusively in words of foreign origin, such as kilowatt. And some lists count RR (erre), CH and LL, all of which have distinctive sounds in combination. According to the Real Academia Española, which is considered the arbiter of what's official Spanish, the following letters make up the Spanish alphabet:

    a, b, c, d, e, f, g, h, i, j, k, l, m, n, ñ, o, p, q, r, s, t, u, v, w, x, y, z


    Thanks for the heads up on this...I never knew that there was a controversy.
     
  7. frenetic macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2004
    Location:
    Amsterdam
    #7
    To the OP: I would not do it. I have an international qwerty keyboard but my girlfriend has the Spanish version, since she is Spanish, and it is a pain in the ass every time I use her computer. Yes, all letters are on the same spot, but punctuation and special signs are all over the place, as well as accents... I know that I struggle with it, perhaps you are better at remembering different keyboards...

    double ll (la llana) is considered to be a separate letter, but when typing you just use two regular l's. Idem for rr.

    Frenetic
     

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