Brief question about event photography

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Shacklebolt, Oct 24, 2011.

  1. Shacklebolt macrumors 6502a

    Shacklebolt

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2004
    #1
    Hey folks -- just a quick problem I'm having:

    When you cover an event, what do you include for you client afterward? Someone I shot for is now awkwardly asking for the full library of photos I shot for their event (700 stills, many of them obviously similar). I was planning on sending the best 100 or so.

    Is this not the way it normally happens? Is it reasonable for me to say, "I apologize, event photographers don't include that normally." or do they? (I was under the impression that no, they do not.
     
  2. Bonch macrumors 6502

    Bonch

    Joined:
    May 28, 2005
    Location:
    Lithuania
    #2
    The buyer just wants final pick. Nothing wrong with that if you are ok with it. Write a contract before you begin the work and if you are not comfortable with the terms, don't accept the job.

    You are providing a service for a fee. If you are not comfortable with the service, then don't provide it. As the great Pete Townshend once said: "I provide a service, these are my terms and this is my fee. If you don't want to hire me, don't hire me".
     
  3. Flash SWT macrumors 6502

    Flash SWT

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2009
    Location:
    Houston, TX
    #3
    As Bonch mentioned, what does your contract say? What did y'all agree to beforehand?
     
  4. btbrossard macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2008
    Location:
    Chicagoland
    #4
    Was this discussed before the shoot? Or was there no discussion about how many images you would supply?

    If you went over this and you said you would provide only the best 100 or so, leave it at that. They can buy the extra images if they really want.

    If there was no discussion about this point, I would just provide all the images to them. No use in leaving a sour note with a client about this. It's not really going to cost you additional to burn the images to a DVD for them.

    In the future, put it in writing. You pay X, in return I give you this.
     
  5. fitshaced macrumors 68000

    fitshaced

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2011
    #5
    I'd tell them that all the pics were taken in RAW format and require editing because of that. Therefore, you'd prefer to provide only the best ones. You are proud of your work and see only the best pics being sufficient. Compare it to be like an artist not allowing the model to see the painting until it is finished.
     
  6. sim667 macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2010
    #6
    Make sure you word your license to use form carefully.
     
  7. compuwar macrumors 601

    compuwar

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2006
    Location:
    Northern/Central VA
    #7
    Never give up anything that's not the best shot you could have gotten without a very good reason. Never shoot anything for someone else without an up-front understanding of what's to be delivered.

    Paul
     
  8. Shacklebolt thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Shacklebolt

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2004
    #8
    Yup, fortunately I met with the client yesterday and they're happy with the work. It was a dark room, lit in red (my D300 was not thrilled), so I'd say 3/5 of the shots were flash (of people, mostly), 2/5 were not. Many of the non-flash I took a ton of shots of were ambiance-type stuff: e.g. 10 shots of the full room from one angle at the same time,15 shots of pre-party cocktail arrangements from the exact same angle. For obvious reasons, I don't want them to see all 15, especially if there's one specifically I'm proudest of.

    Frankly, in the day and age of digital when relative n00bs like me (4 years experience) have the luxury of taking a ton of shots of events, I'm pretty pleased with a 1:7 give-to-client:not-give-to-client ratio. Beyond them liking the showt, they were happy with the way I carried myself at the event, so I guess that's all I can ask for. I'll of course work to bring that ratio down, and to figure out more creative shots in the future.

    Most important lesson learned here for me -- no matter how friendly you are with the client beforehand, make sure you have a contract signed <smacks forehead, breathes a sigh of relief at minimal repercussions>.
     
  9. Flash SWT macrumors 6502

    Flash SWT

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2009
    Location:
    Houston, TX
    #9
    And remember, professional photographers license images, we don't sell them. Images should be licensed for specific uses for specific amounts of time and this should all be included in any contracts beforehand.
     
  10. mulo macrumors 68020

    mulo

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2010
    Location:
    Behind you
    #10
    and what would a specific license include?
     
  11. Flash SWT macrumors 6502

    Flash SWT

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2009
    Location:
    Houston, TX
    #11
    It would only include what usage you are granting the client.

    • One time editorial usage in <specific newspaper>.
    • A 10,000 copy print run of 20x30 inch posters to be sold in Texas.
    • A six month print advertising campaign in North America.
    • Three year web advertising on <specific website>.
    • etc.

    Clients will always want a ton of usage for not much money. It is your job to balance the two so both parties are happy. The more things they are allowed to do with your photos the more it should cost them.

    Here is a good resource on the basics:
    http://asmp.org/tutorials/licensing-guide.html

    And Plus has some nice information:
    http://www.useplus.com/useplus/pluspacks.asp
     
  12. CounterCulture macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    May 21, 2011
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    #12
    nothing worse then having a choose all the horrible choices, share them to the world via social media, and have a caption stating "Photography by ****".....

    not only is that embarassing, but it also gets everyone else to think that you're not a great photographer. i personally believe that it's a photographers job to take the pictures, and also choose them. Photographers shoot thousands of photos in one shoot. Only 1 makes the cover.
     

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