Broadwell... The main reason for the mini's delay.

SolarShane

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Mar 7, 2014
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0
Taking a look at Intel's NUC consumer roadmap, Broadwell is slated for Q3 2014. However, for corporations, Broadwell will most likely be available in mid-2014, if not earlier.

Thus, the 2014 Mac mini is coming. I just think AAPL is waiting on Broadwell to start producing the mini. My estimated time frame is Summer of 14'. Some interesting features of Broadwell:

  • Integrated Wi-Fi. (Meaning more room for shrinkage)
  • 2 SSD slots. (2" and 2.5")
  • Powering a display via MiniHDMI


Reference:
Intel NUC Consumer Roadmap
 
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squirrrl

macrumors 6502a
Sep 11, 2013
853
258
San Diego, CA
Taking a look at Intel's NUC consumer roadmap, Broadwell is slated for Q3 2014. However, for corporations, Broadwell will most likely be available in mid-2014, if not earlier.

Thus, the 2014 Mac mini is coming. I just think AAPL is waiting on Broadwell to start producing the mini. My estimated time frame is Summer of 14'. Some interesting features of Broadwell:

  • hello


Reference:
Intel NUC Consumer Roadmap
but it says those are for i3 and i5's... what about i7s?
 

Jambalaya

macrumors 6502a
Jun 21, 2013
686
98
UK
I don't see the Mini getting the new chip before the other higher profile machines in Apple's line up. If there is a 2014 Mini it will be Haswell, I think more likely it's 2015 now sadly.
 

paulrbeers

macrumors 68040
Dec 17, 2009
3,960
120
Taking a look at Intel's NUC consumer roadmap, Broadwell is slated for Q3 2014. However, for corporations, Broadwell will most likely be available in mid-2014, if not earlier.

Thus, the 2014 Mac mini is coming. I just think AAPL is waiting on Broadwell to start producing the mini. My estimated time frame is Summer of 14'. Some interesting features of Broadwell:

  • Integrated Wi-Fi. (Meaning more room for shrinkage)
  • 2 SSD slots. (2" and 2.5")
  • Powering a display via MiniHDMI


Reference:
Intel NUC Consumer Roadmap
Broadwell has been delayed until Q4. Just google "Broadwell delayed". In February it was announced. Rumor has it the NUC will actually come out before wide spread availability to OEMs. Because if the Broadwell delay, Intel is/has released a refreshed Haswell line as a stop gap.

Intel has no real competition so the delay makes sense....

Edit: Also, if you look at your link, it shows the Intel NUCs w/ broadwell being released in Q4, not Q3.
 
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Santabean2000

macrumors 68000
Nov 20, 2007
1,781
1,743
My bet is they will use a msata ssd.

Image
Nah, it's no a feature on any other Mac. We're in for a blade, but will we get two, now that is the question.

I don't know why Apple doesn't offer dual SSDs on their line up. Doesn't want to confuse the user I guess but having two locations to put things. And they get to charge for larger more expensive SSDs too...:mad:
 

Mal67

macrumors 6502a
Apr 2, 2006
518
35
West Oz
Unless there's big plans for the mini or alternatively it's just ticking along until its demise there really is no excuse for Apple's lack of interest in the mini. However whether there is a future planned Broadwell version or not, it does not explain why the mini has not received a Haswell upgrade, an upgrade which could easily have been done some months ago. I am sure the updated graphics at the very least would have made it worthwhile alone.
 
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Fishrrman

macrumors P6
Feb 20, 2009
17,209
5,551
tom vilsack wrote above:
[[ My bet is they will use a msata ssd ]]

Sounds like a winning bet!

Since the Mini is also used as a "server platform", and since I would think most server administrators want and need accessibility and expandability, might we see a Mini that uses either
1. A slot for an mSATA drive -and- an additional slot for a small "blade drive" (with the blade drive containing the default from-the-factory SSD)
or
2. TWO mSATA slots.

I'm thinking that for server purposes, only one drive won't be considered "enough". Instead of two 2.5" SATA drives, we could see two mSATA's...
 

paulrbeers

macrumors 68040
Dec 17, 2009
3,960
120
My bet is they will use a msata ssd.

Image
Why? Why would they use a custom piece solely for the Mini? All MBA's, rMBP's, Mac Pro's and iMac's use PCIE SSD's. Seems weird that Apple would switch to using slower mSATA for the Mac Mini.

My guess is they will offer a stick PCIE SSD and a 2.5" hard drive going forward simply because they spent all the time and resources to build Fusion functionality into OSX. If they go to a Stick PCIESSD, they could easily make the Mini at least somewhat smaller.
 

Crosscreek

macrumors 68030
Nov 19, 2013
2,862
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Margarittaville
tom vilsack wrote above:
[[ My bet is they will use a msata ssd ]]

Sounds like a winning bet!

Since the Mini is also used as a "server platform", and since I would think most server administrators want and need accessibility and expandability, might we see a Mini that uses either
1. A slot for an mSATA drive -and- an additional slot for a small "blade drive" (with the blade drive containing the default from-the-factory SSD)
or
2. TWO mSATA slots.

I'm thinking that for server purposes, only one drive won't be considered "enough". Instead of two 2.5" SATA drives, we could see two mSATA's...
Msata makes sense for PCI and I agree that's probably be what we see.

I think they will add Sata3 cable and empty 2.5 bay to add a spinner or SSD for the server version.

We won't see it before IMac refresh and if Broadwell not until 2015.
 

johngwheeler

macrumors 6502
Dec 30, 2010
392
43
I come from a land down-under...
Apple won't use mSATA SSD - it's obsolescent

tom vilsack wrote above:
[[ My bet is they will use a msata ssd ]]

Sounds like a winning bet!

Since the Mini is also used as a "server platform", and since I would think most server administrators want and need accessibility and expandability, might we see a Mini that uses either
1. A slot for an mSATA drive -and- an additional slot for a small "blade drive" (with the blade drive containing the default from-the-factory SSD)
or
2. TWO mSATA slots.

I'm thinking that for server purposes, only one drive won't be considered "enough". Instead of two 2.5" SATA drives, we could see two mSATA's...
I think it highly unlikely that Apple would go backwards to older technology and use mSATA SSDs, especially considering that nearly all of their current machines use PCIe SSDs.

Bear in mind that mSATA is restricted to SATA 3.0 speeds (6Gbps), which PCIe based SSDs are not.

The successor to mSATA is M.2, which is smaller and can use SATA 3.0, PCIe and USB 3.0 buses.

The trend for all manufacturers will be to use PCIe connectivity for future SSDs, so no way is Apple going to use old technology in the new Mini.

John.
 

RoastingPig

macrumors 68000
Jul 23, 2012
1,605
62
SoCal
hopefully they dont go all out NUC on this machine. If they keep a similar type body were definitley in order for pcie ssd's of the blade variety. i still think there gonna stick to the conventional mac mini desktop form and leave that arm powered 1 display msata computer thing for the apple tv to compete with chromebox and rasberry pi type stuff
 

Crosscreek

macrumors 68030
Nov 19, 2013
2,862
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I think it highly unlikely that Apple would go backwards to older technology and use mSATA SSDs, especially considering that nearly all of their current machines use PCIe SSDs.

Bear in mind that mSATA is restricted to SATA 3.0 speeds (6Gbps), which PCIe based SSDs are not.

The successor to mSATA is M.2, which is smaller and can use SATA 3.0, PCIe and USB 3.0 buses.

The trend for all manufacturers will be to use PCIe connectivity for future SSDs, so no way is Apple going to use old technology in the new Mini.

John.
M.2 SATA would allow Apple to keep a proprietary design forcing us to use only their M.2 so we pay the Apple tax. Makes sense. :(
 

paulrbeers

macrumors 68040
Dec 17, 2009
3,960
120
M.2 SATA would allow Apple to keep a proprietary design forcing us to use only their M.2 so we pay the Apple tax. Makes sense. :(
Actually M.2 is now an industry standard. Many PC ultrabooks have gone or are going to M.2. In fact, you can actually buy M.2s at places like newegg. Apple's PCIE SSD's are proprietary are completely Apple's design with no where currently (OWC is working on it) to buy an aftermarket SSD. So no, M.2. would not be an Apple Proprietary design, it would be the opposite.
 

Crosscreek

macrumors 68030
Nov 19, 2013
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Actually M.2 is now an industry standard. Many PC ultrabooks have gone or are going to M.2. In fact, you can actually buy M.2s at places like newegg. Apple's PCIE SSD's are proprietary are completely Apple's design with no where currently (OWC is working on it) to buy an aftermarket SSD. So no, M.2. would not be an Apple Proprietary design, it would be the opposite.
So we still pay the Apple tax. OWC prices are still high compared to other SSD manufacturers but they do provide quality components.
 

CausticPuppy

macrumors 65816
May 1, 2012
1,483
18
Taking a look at Intel's NUC consumer roadmap, Broadwell is slated for Q3 2014. However, for corporations, Broadwell will most likely be available in mid-2014, if not earlier.

Thus, the 2014 Mac mini is coming. I just think AAPL is waiting on Broadwell to start producing the mini. My estimated time frame is Summer of 14'. Some interesting features of Broadwell:

  • Integrated Wi-Fi. (Meaning more room for shrinkage)
  • 2 SSD slots. (2" and 2.5")
  • Powering a display via MiniHDMI


Reference:
Intel NUC Consumer Roadmap

Based on the NUC models I think there's definitely going to be a smaller redesign of the mac mini. They could have easily stuck Haswell in the current case, but they didn't, because something else must be in the works... [/wild speculation]

I predict something NUC sized but way more powerful. Unfortunately it'll likely be less upgradeable too. Maybe PCI-e SSD will be standard to eliminate the need to fit a 2.5" HDD into the case?
 

Acorn

macrumors 68020
Jan 2, 2009
2,493
231
macrumors
the haswell has a higher wattage then what we are using now. hopefully broadwell will use less juice so they can shrink the case down.

if they could manage to shrink it down to the size of their external cd rom drive they sell and still have an i7 processor in it that would be impressive. theoretically it is possible if they can squeeze them in the 15 inch retinas. they are at least that thin. I know I would buy one.
 

squirrrl

macrumors 6502a
Sep 11, 2013
853
258
San Diego, CA
the haswell has a higher wattage then what we are using now. hopefully broadwell will use less juice so they can shrink the case down.

if they could manage to shrink it down to the size of their external cd rom drive they sell and still have an i7 processor in it that would be impressive. theoretically it is possible if they can squeeze them in the 15 inch retinas. they are at least that thin. I know I would buy one.
If they did shrink it down that far, you'd probably lose upgradability. Since I plan on keeping my next mac mini for a while, i'd be nice to be able to switch out SSDs eventually for something with more capacity rather than buy a new mini or an external drive.
 

wavespank

macrumors newbie
Feb 18, 2009
6
0
I don't see any need for shrinking the physical size of the Mini. Any smaller and you won't have the room for the number of external connections that we have now. A second thunderbolt connector would be nice in exchange for the FW800 that resides on the current Minis. Removing the SDXC slot to allow room for an externally inserted mSATA SSD (or new variant) would allow for expansion without the opening of the chassis. Please leave the combi analog/optical digital audio I/O in the new Mini.
.....or not.
 

Cape Dave

macrumors 68000
Nov 16, 2012
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A8 in a mini is a very scary thought. Would not be a good play at all.

Intel is really what put Apple back on the map, and they had better think long and hard before they blow off Intel. Trust me on this.
 

scottsjack

macrumors 68000
Aug 25, 2010
1,899
261
Arizona
A8 in a mini is a very scary thought. Would not be a good play at all.

Intel is really what put Apple back on the map, and they had better think long and hard before they blow off Intel. Trust me on this.
Same here. It is the hardware and Windows compatibility that got me into the Mac camp. I do not have much interest in radically different hardware, ARM or iOS. If the mini became a one-piece, glued together Internet appliance I doubt if I would have one.
 

Cape Dave

macrumors 68000
Nov 16, 2012
1,932
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Same here. It is the hardware and Windows compatibility that got me into the Mac camp. I do not have much interest in radically different hardware, ARM or iOS. If the mini became a one-piece, glued together Internet appliance I doubt if I would have one.
"It is the hardware and Windows compatibility that got me into the Mac camp."

Amen Brother!