Burning MP3s onto DVD disk

Texas_Toast

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Feb 6, 2016
849
69
Texas
Pardon me, but I know nothing about consumer stuff...


So based on advice from the MacRumors forums last year, I bought a Pioneer BDR-XD05B Blu-ray external disk drive to watch store-bought DVDs (TV shows and movies) on my 2015 Retina.

It works well so far.

How can I take some MP3s recordings that I have on my Retina and burn them onto a blank DVD so that I can then gve that DVD to someone to listen to something?

As mentioned, I have no clue about "consumer" type stuff when it comes to computers or electronic devices, so I'm clueless.

Am hoping that I do not have to buy or install any software, and that macOS Sierra already has something that will allow me to do what I want.

To be clear, I want to make a "data" DVD with files on it, and NOT something that auto-loads and plays.

Thanks.
 

Fishrrman

macrumors P6
Feb 20, 2009
17,449
5,665
My suggestion is that you would do better to burn those mp3's onto a CD, not onto a DVD.

An mp3 CD will be playable in more places than will a DVD with mp3 files on it -- such as a car CD player that also has the capability to play mp3 CD's. An mp3 CD still holds "a lot of stuff".
Mp3's burned onto a DVD will only be readable on a Mac -- I don't think many (any?) car players can read an "mp3 DVD".

You could use Toast to do this, but I think you could also use the FREE apps "Burn" and "Simply Burns" to do it as well.

You can create a folder/file hierarchy for the music (such as artist/album/songs), BUT, I've found that some players also need "metadata tags" in order to properly read the mp3 CD's.

That's not a problem -- you can use the free "Tagger" utility to easily add this info.
 
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Texas_Toast

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Feb 6, 2016
849
69
Texas
My suggestion is that you would do better to burn those mp3's onto a CD, not onto a DVD.

An mp3 CD will be playable in more places than will a DVD with mp3 files on it -- such as a car CD player that also has the capability to play mp3 CD's. An mp3 CD still holds "a lot of stuff".
Mp3's burned onto a DVD will only be readable on a Mac -- I don't think many (any?) car players can read an "mp3 DVD".
You missed what I'm doing...

I got a pack of 10 DVD+R's at the store because it was that or spending $25 on like 100 CD's.

I want to burn a "data" disk, and NOT a "playable" disk...

I just want to share like 5 MP3's and it seemed easier (and cheaper) to get some optical media versus buying a thumbdrive that I wouldn't accept back from this person.

In the 90s and 2000's this is how people shared pictures, music, documents, etc. (I assume what worked then will work now?)


You could use Toast to do this, but I think you could also use the FREE apps "Burn" and "Simply Burns" to do it as well.

You can create a folder/file hierarchy for the music (such as artist/album/songs), BUT, I've found that some players also need "metadata tags" in order to properly read the mp3 CD's.

That's not a problem -- you can use the free "Tagger" utility to easily add this info.
It's like 5 files, so I don't need fodlers or tagging or anything playable.

Is there not software that comes with macOS Sierra that will do this?
[doublepost=1551407272][/doublepost]
Everything you need is already baked into the Mac OS. I just tried it and it works. It produces a data dvd playabable on any Mac or Windows computer. Check it out:

https://support.apple.com/guide/mac-help/burn-cds-and-dvds-mchl8addfd95/mac
That link is in ITALIAN and as mentioned before, do NOT want a "playable" disk.

I want a DVD holding like 5 MP3's that this guy can pop in his computer, open up Windows Explorer (or macOS Finder), copy the MP3's to his HDD, and then play them.

(I'm being nice and sharing some radio shows with a kid at the local record store, and trying to do it on the cheap. Spending $10 on a USB drive for a one time share is not ideal, especially if he's like, "Awesome music, can I have a couple more?" Well, that costs me another $10!!)
 

Nermal

Moderator
Staff member
Dec 7, 2002
18,691
1,186
New Zealand
It's like 5 files, so I don't need fodlers or tagging or anything playable.

Is there not software that comes with macOS Sierra that will do this?
Just insert a blank DVD and drag the files onto it. It's more-or-less like using a flash drive.
 

Texas_Toast

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Feb 6, 2016
849
69
Texas
Just insert a blank DVD and drag the files onto it. It's more-or-less like using a flash drive.
Both you and the person who created the viedo below leave out *important* steps...



1.) Make sure you OPTION drag files and folders into Finder, otherwise you'll burn a DVD with a shortcut and not the actual files.

2.) Click on the "Burn" button in the upper-right-hand corner of Finder. (Simply dragging files onto the DVD does nothing!)

It took me two days to figure all of this out... (Thumbs up to ME!)
 

Nermal

Moderator
Staff member
Dec 7, 2002
18,691
1,186
New Zealand
Make sure you OPTION drag files and folders into Finder, otherwise you'll burn a DVD with a shortcut and not the actual files.
That shouldn't happen. I've never had to hold Option. Does anyone else know what could cause this?

Click on the "Burn" button in the upper-right-hand corner of Finder. (Simply dragging files onto the DVD does nothing!)
And again, I'm not sure why you had to do that. It should prompt you when you go to eject the disc.
 

Texas_Toast

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Feb 6, 2016
849
69
Texas
That shouldn't happen. I've never had to hold Option. Does anyone else know what could cause this?


And again, I'm not sure why you had to do that. It should prompt you when you go to eject the disc.
I tried this on my Retina running macOS Sierra.


When I followed your advice above and dragged the folder/files I wanted to burn onto the blank DVD, they appeared on the DVD, but when I ejected the DVD ad then plugged the player into my old make and attemtped to access the files, there was nothing there.

When I added the two extra steps that I mentioned, then I could hear the DVD being burned, and when I tried to access them later, they worked on my Retina and my old MacBook.