But I bet it worked... (Subsitute Teacher Clothespins Students)

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by JNB, Apr 5, 2007.

  1. JNB macrumors 604

    JNB

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    #1
    AMANDA, Ohio (AP) -- A substitute teacher's tool for silencing chatty kindergartners -- clothespins -- doesn't wash with school officials.

    Four boys said spring-type clothespins were placed over their upper or lower lips for talking too much in class, Amanda-Clearcreek Primary School principal Mike Johnsen wrote in a letter to parents this week.

    Ruth Ann Stoneburner, a retired school nurse who had worked as a substitute for several years, confirmed to Johnsen that she had used the clothespin discipline March 26, he said.

    Stoneburner will not work again in the Amanda-Clearcreek district and was being reported to the state education department, Superintendent J.B. Dick said Wednesday.

    Officials found out about the discipline after a parent complained. The students weren't hurt, but the punishment isn't condoned by the district, Dick said.

    Stoneburner could not be reached for comment.
     
  2. Abstract macrumors Penryn

    Abstract

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  3. iSaint macrumors 603

    iSaint

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    #4
    Those who can't, teach. like me

    Those who really can't, substitute teach.
     
  4. Abstract macrumors Penryn

    Abstract

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  5. Sdashiki macrumors 68040

    Sdashiki

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    #6
    Why is there air?

    Any Phys Ed teacher will tell you.

    To blow up basketballs.
     
  6. 2nyRiggz macrumors 603

    2nyRiggz

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    #7
    A good clothes pinning to the lips is always good for rude kids....no story here...move along.




    Bless
     
  7. someguy macrumors 68020

    someguy

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    #8
    What ever happened to real discipline? When a teacher could take a kid out back and paddle the snot out of him for acting up?
     
  8. Abstract macrumors Penryn

    Abstract

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    #9
    Well, the idea of talking to your children and explaining to them why their actions were wrong sounds like a great plan.

    On the other hand, if you look at us children born in the 1980s and earlier, it obviously hasn't worked (generally speaking). :p
     
  9. thedude110 macrumors 68020

    thedude110

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    #10
    It's a question of saying "No" to the kids, meaning "No" when you say "No," clearly explaining why you're saying "No," and finding a respectful way of enforcing that "No."

    It's also a question of finding out why kids are acting the way they're acting and addressing those root causes. If we want them to have any chance, we've gotta understand them.

    I also worry a bit that this case comes to our attention because it was a sub who did this. Subs get crappy media play, get treated like crap by kids and by full time teachers. And yet many subs -- long term subs I'm thinking of here -- fundamentally hold our schools together.

    Just one short example -- I work at a satellite school of a large high school. A long term sub finished her term on Thursday, and brought a cake for the full time teachers -- in part to kiss up, and in part because she was grateful. The result? A sudden, rushed email from the dept. supervisor that someone had better go get a card!

    Such that:

    People! Love your subs.
     
  10. Drizzt macrumors member

    Drizzt

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    #11
    Crap...Amanda is only an hour away from where I live. I just had a track meet there a week ago! I find it even more interesting that I read this first on a worldwide computer-talk forum than through my local press. :rolleyes:
     
  11. MacNut macrumors Core

    MacNut

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    #12
    [​IMG] That will teach them not to mess with the teacher.
     
  12. SilentPanda Moderator emeritus

    SilentPanda

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    #13
    At that age I think I was putting clothespins on my own lips because it was fun.
     
  13. herr_neumann macrumors 6502

    herr_neumann

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    #14
    What, was she out of staples? I am sure it would have worked much better. Hmm... she would have probably needed one of the old classic swingline staplers for that though, the new ones just do not drive the staples with enough power....
     
  14. iSaint macrumors 603

    iSaint

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    #15
    There's only a certain amount of touchy-feely that works in public schools these days. I try to dig a little into the history of the students who are making Ds and Fs in my high school English classes in an effort to help them. Many, however, come from a background where they have never learned to respect others, let alone themselves. Therefore they don't know how to accept help from someone who cares.

    I subbed for five weeks last year before I had my first teaching job. I held it together, barely. I stuck to the lesson plans left for me.

    This year, one of my one-day subs told students all about a novel we were reading. Of course, this individual had never read the novel and was only basing their knowledge on racist rumors. It presented a great teaching opportunity when I returned.
     
  15. thedude110 macrumors 68020

    thedude110

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    #16
    I don't disagree with this -- kids need clear limits, and when they push beyond those limits, they need to have clear, stepped out consequences.

    At the same time, part of our job, I think, is to try to teach them to respect themselves and others (especially if they're not being taught that at home, or if they don't have a home, or whatever). Don't mean to pass myself off as a counselor ('cause god knows I'm not) but I spend a lot of time counseling the kids I work with, trying to teach them the difference between "right" and "wrong." This in turn creates conflict for me, since I'm not sure I believe in "right" and "wrong."

    Something from Levinas, that matters a lot to me, and that I'm grappling with at the moment (as it's awfully idealistic) -- "The charity that comes before justice must also come after." By which I guess I mean we must be vigilant -- not only in our caring and our consequences, but in their relationship to one another. Levinas was protesting the death penalty, but his words apply in our case, too -- charity is primary (and ongoing), but justice interjects itself as a sort of passive virus within that charity.

    I guess more simply I'm struggling with this question: In the face of blatant disrespect (though disrespect rooted in real and ongoing reasons), what is the limit of my compassion? What is the role of justice in compassion? And how do I make sure that charity always tempers the justice I administer? If history is "any judge," the kids I work with don't have much of a chance, anyway. Which opens a more worrisome question for me: At what point do I give up on a kid, and at what point do I admit I've given up on a kid?

    This is the ugly reality of teaching (as I'm coming to understand it, now 7 years in) -- the depth of our individual (and collective) failures, not the "rewards" of our "successes."

    /threadhijack
     
  16. iSaint macrumors 603

    iSaint

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    #17
    Thanks thedude110. I'm only one year in, so I'm meeting with a lot of frustrations on my part from the students' disrespect. I have 'talked' to a few students who choose to come to after school remediation or in-room detention. I've gained the respect of a few who at first were very loud and disrespectful. I do wish, however, there were more teachers with the compassion you speak of. I think I have it as I was once a youth minister, but it's a lot harder in this environment.

    Our principal acknowledges the students' lack of discipline outside of school. He also tells us to take time to teach it to our kids!

    In regard to blatant disrespect: I think there are times we can be compassionate and issue a calm, verbal warning. We also have to let them get it out of their system (as long as they do stop eventually and without cursing or getting violent). However, there are also times we have to set the example. Again, it may be when the student gets to my after school detention that I talk to them in a compassionate manner, or try to dig a little to see what's going on behind the scenes. In my community, more times than not, it's not a good situation at home.

    Hang in there!
     

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