Buying a used 2010 Pro. Some advice?

Discussion in 'Mac Pro' started by CanadaMaple, May 3, 2015.

  1. CanadaMaple macrumors member

    Joined:
    May 1, 2015
    #1
    Im going to be buying a used 2010 Mac Pro 2.4 8 core this week.
    Comes with 32gb ram.

    I currently am running a 2008 8 core 3.0.

    From what I understand I should be able to upgrade the 2010 to X5690 Xeon's?

    Are those the best CPU's I can put in it?

    Also what are the differences between the 2010 model and 2012? Just CPU?

    Thanks

    -CM
     
  2. bax2003 macrumors 6502a

    bax2003

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2011
    Location:
    Belgrade, Serbia
    #2
    - You will be able to upgrade to X5690s
    - Those are the fastest and most expensive CPUs for Mac Pro 5.1
    - 2010 vs 2012 - just CPU difference
     
  3. CanadaMaple thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    May 1, 2015
    #3
    Thanks!

    I was looking around, didn't seem too bad. about 250$ a CPU. Compared to original CPU's should be a major difference?

    Thats what it seemed re: 2010 vs 2012 but wanted to make sure.
     
  4. bax2003 macrumors 6502a

    bax2003

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2011
    Location:
    Belgrade, Serbia
    #4
    If you are using apps which take advantage of lots of CPU threads and lots of RAM (Adobe After Effects for example), yes, it is a huge difference. Even where single core speed is important, there will be quite a jump because of clock speed differences.
     
  5. dmylrea macrumors 68000

    dmylrea

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2005
    #5
    Since you are having to buy two Xeons, you could save significant money getting X5680's instead of X5690's. There is about 3% speed difference, yet you can save quite a bit since X5680's are $167 shipped (not to Canada, though, if that is where you are).

    Bragging rights and benchmarks aside, you'll not notice a difference.
     
  6. IowaLynn macrumors 6502a

    IowaLynn

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2015
    #6
    Even dual 4-core @ 3.xGHz would be a nice jump from those.

    6-core (single processor) is often best and sweet spot. Dual gives you twice the DIMM slots and when memory prices were high, it was (in 2009 especially) a better trade off to get slower 8-core and use cheaper 4GB DIMMs to get 32GB RAM.

    In the last year, using PCIe adapters along with a XP941 or the Apple blade SSD has proven to give systems a nice boost in IO performance.

    The only difference I heard of was on Barefeats where some GPU tests showed a slight edge to 2012 over 2010 and of course 2009, so maybe PCIe support (2.2) saw some change or newer chipset perhaps.

    Enjoy - should be a wonderful gem.
     

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