Buying canon 450d - what software to get?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by drummerlondonw3, Nov 8, 2008.

  1. drummerlondonw3 macrumors 6502a

    drummerlondonw3

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2008
    Location:
    London
    #1
    Hi,

    I am going to invest in a canon 450d DSLR and I have a couple of noob questions

    1) What is the benefit/downfalls of shooting in RAW vs JPEG?

    2) Could someone please explain what the uses for aperture and lightroom are? ***please note this is not what are the differences but what is the benefit of using that TYPE of software***

    3) Does Photoshop CS4 support the 450d shooting in RAW? ( I understand that the 450d is not supported in Aperture ?? )

    4) Is this a good deal link

    5) Is it worth buying CS4 over Elements? The cost isn't really the major factor because (1) I would see it as an investment (2) I could get an education discount

    6) Any general tips on the 450.

    My experience in cameras isn't massive but I have done a fair amount of non-digital photography and some work with the previous model of the 450

    If anyone can shed some light on any/all of those points it's be great

    D:apple:
     
  2. SimD macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2008
    #2
    RAW is uncompressed and it allows extensive adjustments to be made post-shot. There is a much more technical answer, but this sums it up.

    In other words, RAW > JPEG in every way.


    Aperture and Lightroom IMHO are programs that are used to adjust/manage/organize photos. The adjustments that can be made in both apps are amazing. iPhoto, though, might just be enough.

    Photoshop supports pretty much every RAW format out there. So does Aperture, you're confused with tethering abilities. In that sense, you are correct, you cannot tether in Aperture using a 450D.

    If cost is no issue, I see no reason not to get PS. Mind you, the learning curve might be a little steep.

    the 450D is a fine body. IMHO, Glass is more important, unless there is a specific feature you need (i.e. fast action photography, high iso photography..). The 450D will last you very long. Invest in glass.

    Hope this helps.

    For the record, I shoot with a 400D. It does what I need. So, I invested in L glass. Much better investment for me that a new body.

    I also use Aperture. :)
     
  3. drummerlondonw3 thread starter macrumors 6502a

    drummerlondonw3

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2008
    Location:
    London
    #3
    SimD thanks for your quick response!

    I think that has really helped with my understanding, you are right I had completely misunderstood about the RAW compatibility:eek:. So just to be clear, I can import and manipulate RAW files in aperture but it doesn't support the tethering or connected shooting :confused:

    Having not really used the software yet but would the optimal set-up be Aperture AND Photoshop or would I be able to get away with just having Aperture?
    - to place some context in it I wouldn't be doing image changing (not sure of the technical term) but really just post-production on white balance and son on

    thanks

    D:apple:
     
  4. Kebabselector macrumors 68030

    Kebabselector

    Joined:
    May 25, 2007
    Location:
    Birmingham, UK
    #4
    Do you need aperture/lightroom?, both are excellent workflow/library tools with small editing functionality. CS3/4 can handle raw files from a 450d (also the supplied Canon software will be fine).

    Have you considered either iPhoto or Photoshop elements?
     
  5. drummerlondonw3 thread starter macrumors 6502a

    drummerlondonw3

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2008
    Location:
    London
    #6
    burning the midnight UK oil too?? ;):D

    Well i think that iphoto is too limited for what I had in mind, but I would be willing to consider Elements have u used this and what software do u use?

    thanks
     
  6. ChrisA macrumors G4

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2006
    Location:
    Redondo Beach, California
    #7
    Get Elements. It will likey do everything you need. Elements lacks some features used mostly by graphic artest developing content for print. Later if you do want to upgrade Adobe gives good credit for the cost of Elements and the user interface is very, very close. You don't loose much in the Elements to PS CS4 upgrade

    Why buy Aperture or LR? They are good for cataloging images and making adjustments.
     
  7. AlaskaMoose macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2008
    Location:
    Alaska
    #8
    Agree with you. Elements does an excellent job with RAW or JPEG images. However, I only shoot RAW, and PP with Elements.
     
  8. TheReef macrumors 68000

    TheReef

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2007
    Location:
    NSW, Australia.
    #9
    I reckon you could get away with Aperture for edits and adjustments, it offers a quite lot.

    I wouldn't recommend iPhoto, organization becomes a mess when you start having thousands of photos, in that case you'd need Elements for adjustments too. Now that I have Aperture I only use Elements for web design…
     
  9. Kebabselector macrumors 68030

    Kebabselector

    Joined:
    May 25, 2007
    Location:
    Birmingham, UK
    #10
    Yep, actually lost track of time

    I've used the old Elements 4 and that was fine, though limited (for me).

    Currently use Lightroom2 and CS3, though I do process a fair few images a month (depending on work that is). Most of my work is done in Lightroom at present. I've not used a the newer versions of elements so don't know if the batch features are present.

    One good thing is the 30 day trials, as you can really see what they do (just a pity Apple doesn't do 30 day trials on other software - mainly FCE!).
     
  10. bearcatrp macrumors 68000

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    Boon Docks USA
  11. Syonidism macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2009
    Location:
    Turkey
    #12
    I heard a russian hacker made a movie recording studio.
    Naturally i investigated...
    ive founda program called eos_movrec which is a counterpart of that program. HOWEVER it crashes everytime i launch it.

    I googled it and saw that it needed some frameworks. I cant find them. help?
     
  12. OreoCookie macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2001
    Location:
    Sendai, Japan
    #13
    A RAW file is a digital negative that needs to be developed. If you shoot jpg, the camera converts the RAW data into a photo already. If you shoot RAW, you have to do that afterwards on your Mac. You cannot really share RAW files with friends (they'd have to develop the photo again).

    RAW files are for advanced users in my opinion:
    - Your camera will be slower in RAW mode (much smaller bursts, longer save times).
    - It takes applications such as Aperture or Lightroom to handle RAW files efficiently. These apps need a lot of resources (RAW files weigh in at about 10 MB a piece; multiply that by 100 and you know why you need a fast computer).
    - You have pretty much zero advantages compared to shooting jpg if you do not develop RAW files by hand.
    - With properly exposed photos, the differences in quality will be very small.

    Some advantages:
    + RAW files contain more information that can be exploited if you know what you're doing. You can recover blown highlights, for instance.
    + You have much more leeway to correct the white balance of a shot. This is particularly important for skin tones -- but only useful if you work with a hardware calibrated monitor.
    + It's uncompressed.

    Some things RAW files cannot do:
    n Make coffee.
    n Make a bad photo into a good photo by endlessly photochopping it.


    At the end of the day, however, you will end up with a jpg (or tiff or whatever your preferred image format is) even if you shoot RAW.

    If you're new to dslrs, I would first focus on other things such as using your camera properly and shoot jpg. Once you have managed to get accustomed to your new camera (after a few thousand shots), you can start shooting RAW in situations of difficult light (high ISO). This will give you an idea when shooting RAW can give you an edge and when it can't.
    Aperture and Lightroom are to iPhoto what Final Cut Pro and Adobe Premiere are to iMovie. They are tools to manage your photos and they are made to develop RAW files. In my opinion, you can forget about shooting RAW if you don't use a tool like this.

    Both offer free trials. Despite rumors to the contrary, both work just fine if you shoot jpg.
    Aperture fully supports the RAW format of the 450D.
    Plus, with Aperture and Lightroom, most of the time, you won't need Photoshop at all! If you are an occasional user, have a look at Pixelmator which is a very good competitor to Photoshop Elements. I personally have Pixelmator and its newest incarnation is very powerful, has everything I need and has a Mac-like interface.
    That depends on who is asking. If you're an aspiring graphics designer, then yes, you need CS4. If you're a student, get the whole design suite.
    However, most won't need the extra functions of CS4 (compared to Pixelmator or Photoshop Elements).
    Lenses are much more important than bodies. Resist the urge to upgrade the body when a hypothetical 550D is released, invest in good glass instead. Some third-party glass offers equal optical performance at much lower cost. Just ask around in this forum.
     
  13. HBOC macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2008
    Location:
    SLC
    #14
    I shoot with an XSI (450D), and love it. I have had all sorts of cameras.. I had an EOS-3, and Elan 7E, and old EOS 650, and EOS 20 and 30D, and now this.
    I did have a G10 as well :) .

    Yes, the XSi is limited on some aspects, but unless (as someone pointed out) you are shooting sports or strictly low light situations and need lightning fast AF, the XSi is great. Invest in glass, whether it be L or otherwise.

    CS4 has RAW 5.0. It opens up the CR2 files of the Canons (I am unsure if the 5D/1 series have CR2 files, or if they are something else...) perfectly.

    Back when I had my 30D 3 years ago, the Canon DPP software was amazing, since it was the only program that would open up the RAW files of the 30D. CS2 didn't handle those files. I reformatted my laptop, and haven't even installed the Canon software.

    If you are not going to be enlarging your photos, then RAW is just going to be a burden in your workflow. RAW files are basically RAW data, so to speak. You need to apply sharpening and other aspects to a RAW file. JPEG, the camera processes the files in-camera..just like a point n' shoot camera.

    I always shoot in RAW, just because maybe a few years down the road I may want to enlarge a photo that I don't want to at the present time...
     
  14. Kebabselector macrumors 68030

    Kebabselector

    Joined:
    May 25, 2007
    Location:
    Birmingham, UK
    #15
    The original post is nearly a year old, think it's been bought back to life by Syonidism
     
  15. HBOC macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2008
    Location:
    SLC
    #16
    shiest, usually i am the one that catches the dates.. ;)
     
  16. Bluebox22 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2009
    Location:
    Arlington, VA
    #17
    True - it's worth getting in on that discount while you're a student -- especially because that'll allow you to pay the upgrade price on future editions.
     

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