Buying New 17" MBP, need fast awnsers: Screen, Processor

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by SamSchneeberger, Feb 29, 2008.

  1. SamSchneeberger macrumors member

    Joined:
    Feb 29, 2008
    #1
    Hey Guys,

    I'm new in the Mac world and I'm heading out to the closest Apple Store (1 hour away...) tomorow to buy the new MBP.

    I need some questions awnsered "fast" before I head out and buy:

    - I'm a pro photographer: Should I get the High res 1920 wide screen or the normal 1680, dunno if my eyes will hurt on that 1920 wide screen. Which one is better quality? (hopefully the 1680)

    - Processors: I have in mind replacing it in 5 years... keeping it as long as possible. Should I get the 2.5 or 2.6 processor? I'm still a student and could always the extra cash saved, but if there really is an advantage i'll buy it. I will probably fill the MBP up pretty fast with tons of photos and games, and use CS3 and Lightroom like crazy on Windows. I'm also a gamer, and play games (simulations which can run up to 14 hours, FlightSim on Windows for example).

    - I'm planning on using windows A LOT because I still have a lot of programs which I dont have the money to buy for Mac. Can I calibrate the monitor through Windows? (Might be a little stupid question, but I dont care I need awnsers now).

    I would appreciate fast and well explained awnsers. I'm still new to all this Mac world.

    Cheers!
    Sam
     
  2. tip macrumors 6502

    tip

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2006
    #2
    I can't answer for which has the better screen, but I will say this:

    - Resolution: I have an older 15" MBP and use Lightroom and Photoshop quite a bit. The 15" screen (at its resolution) is perfectly fine for me - if I needed a larger screen, I'd plug into an external monitor - that's something you might want to consider.
    ........... What resolution do you use currently? If a higher resolution is what you're comfortable with, I'd say go for it. However, you always have the option of going external.

    - Storage: RAW files takes up a LOT of storage. I store most of those on an external disk (next to the monitor). Consider getting either an external drive, or bump up your internal (or do both). I'm guessing you probably realize this already, but just thought I'd bring it up.
    ........... If you're comfortable with upgrading your internal HD yourself, 500GB 2.5" drives should be available this summer (meaning you can go cheap with the internal drive for now (which is still big at 200GB)).

    - 2.5 or 2.6 should suit you for the next several years - either would be okay. In fact, you might want to consider a refurb, since 1) it's in brand-new shape, 2) you can still get extended AppleCare, and 3) it's much cheaper.
    ........... I'm only at 2.0 GHz and I'm not hurting at all (but then again, I'm using everything via OSX and not Windows).
     
  3. SamSchneeberger thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Feb 29, 2008
    #3
    Thanks Tip,

    - I'm getting the 1680 screen in that case, my eyes aren't perfect. 1440 Pixels wide was already fine for me, bigger than 1680 should kill my eyes.

    - Still dont know about the processor... Anyone got opinions?

    Sam,
     
  4. pionata macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2005
    Location:
    Montreal
    #4

    I would go with the 1920 screen and adjust the text/icon size if you ever have problem. It's just a better screen.
     
  5. creator2456 macrumors 68000

    creator2456

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2007
    Location:
    Chicago
    #5
    The Hi-Res 17" screens are LED. Just for that fact I would upgrade to it.

    Also, if you are going to use this at a desk for any amount of time I would suggest going with the high end 15" and getting a nice monitor for it. Also, save the money on the installed HD since I doubt you will fill 200gb up fast enough to warrant spending extra $ on a larger drive when drives are only getting cheaper and larger every month. Another $ saver will be not purchasing apple care with the computer. You have a year to do it and can find some deals on ebay at times.
     
  6. BlizzardBomb macrumors 68030

    BlizzardBomb

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2005
    Location:
    England
    #6
    1) The new HD display is LED backlit unlike the old one. Also it's HD and you plan on doing some pretty demanding stuff so I would recommend it. If you are buying at an Apple store and you still aren't sure, check out a display model if they have one. It can be demanding on the eyes if you have weak eyesight, but for those who don't the benefits far outweigh the cons. Also, Apple should hopefully be fixing the problem with [guide]Resolution Independence[/guide], so providing Apple finalises that soon, you'd have no problem dealing with the higher pixels per inch.

    2) Get the dual 2.5 GHz. The upgrade cost for such a measly increase is ridiculous.

    3) Yes, the monitor can be fiddled with in Windows. Running Windows is just like running it on a similarly spec'd PC.
     
  7. SamSchneeberger thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Feb 29, 2008
    #7
    What exactly does the LEDs change exept battery life?

    I just dont want 1024 px wide pictures to look like icons. I work a lot with pictures that only need to be 1024 pixels wide. Is there any other difference between the 1680 and 1920 screen except size? (Well LED as you guys said)...

    Thanks,
    Sam
     
  8. PkennethV macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2006
    Location:
    Toronto
    #8
    LEDs warm up instantly, so no waiting to get accurate color from the screen. Also, they don't dim over time.

    Go with the 2.5ghz, there's really no real world difference at all between the two.
     
  9. Consultant macrumors G5

    Consultant

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2007
    #9
    1920 comes with LED backlight. Probably 1920, keep in mind the default text will be really small on 1920, but will be fine for photoshopping. You probably need to adjust the text size.

    2.5 is fine. 2.6 not worth it unless you need the fastest processor. More RAM will be better.

    Most monitor calibrators work in both mac and pcs, however, you should be using an external display for critical color work. For graphics work, OS X is much more efficient, so you might want to move some of your apps over.
     

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