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mintakax

macrumors regular
Original poster
Dec 19, 2013
176
24
Well, maybe not bye-bye Apple, but I did have to purchase my first Windows box in over 10 years. I've had several MacPros and was the first on my block to have a nMP. I bought the Windows box because I wanted an Oculus Rift. Its working nicely right now and I love the VR gaming, but seriously, going from OSX to Windows 10 is more than just a paradigm shift. Its literally horrifying !
 

Crosscreek

macrumors 68030
Nov 19, 2013
2,892
5,793
Margarittaville
I tell people that make the jump without running in Bootcamp or a VM is don't try to fix it if it ain't broken. That's where a lot of people run into trouble. It will take a week or two and then it's second nature.
 

JoelTheSuperior

macrumors 6502
Feb 10, 2014
406
443
Don't worry, you'll get used to using Windows soon enough.

I still use macOS as my primary OS but something that I've realised is that of the complaints that I had about Windows stemmed from a mindset of comparing it to macOS - essentially being frustrated with Windows for not being something else.

Once you get into the mindset of Windows and of course, Microsoft, and you start to understand the decisions that have been made, you'll quickly start to find that Windows is a perfectly usable, and in some ways even superior platform.

I've mostly been using Macs because of my interest in music production but having seen REAPER and Studio One this isn't really an issue for me anymore. I'm now just waiting for some good design software to appear on Windows - I'd love to see something like Sketch for example.
 

Silencio

macrumors 68040
Jul 18, 2002
3,472
1,585
NYC
Nothing wrong with having more than one workstation for different purposes. Use the right tool for the job and all of that. I bought some HP Z840 workstations. Generally nice hardware and modular design, nowhere near as elegant or well thought-out as, say the cMP. The performance and expandability are of course fantastic.

Agreed about Windows 10: it feels like a solid core OS, but the UI is disappointingly maddening and inconsistent. Doing all I can to make it work more like Windows 7, which I'm at least accustomed to.
 
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Bubba Satori

Suspended
Feb 15, 2008
4,726
3,756
B'ham
Well, maybe not bye-bye Apple, but I did have to purchase my first Windows box in over 10 years. I've had several MacPros and was the first on my block to have a nMP. I bought the Windows box because I wanted an Oculus Rift. Its working nicely right now and I love the VR gaming, but seriously, going from OSX to Windows 10 is more than just a paradigm shift. Its literally horrifying !

I'm curious.
What exactly is horrifying about the transition from OSX to W10?
Unfamiliarity with basic tasks?
The aesthetics of the GUI?
An inability to adjust to a different workflow?
A VA that actually works?
How much time have you spent getting used to W10?

cortanahero+copy.jpg
 
Last edited:

Jack Burton

macrumors 6502a
Feb 27, 2015
789
1,273
Don't worry, you'll get used to using Windows soon enough.

I still use macOS as my primary OS but something that I've realised is that of the complaints that I had about Windows stemmed from a mindset of comparing it to macOS - essentially being frustrated with Windows for not being something else.

Once you get into the mindset of Windows and of course, Microsoft, and you start to understand the decisions that have been made, you'll quickly start to find that Windows is a perfectly usable, and in some ways even superior platform.

I've mostly been using Macs because of my interest in music production but having seen REAPER and Studio One this isn't really an issue for me anymore. I'm now just waiting for some good design software to appear on Windows - I'd love to see something like Sketch for example.

I haven't seen anything like sketch on win 10, but affinity products have launched on windows. Their products challenge photoshop and illustrator at a fraction of the cost: https://affinity.serif.com/en-us/
 

linuxcooldude

macrumors 68020
Mar 1, 2010
2,480
7,232
It amazes me how many people haven't - their apps are fantastic alternatives to Adobe's very expensive offerings. I'd wholeheartedly recommend them.

While I don't like Adobes pricing, I did buy their standalone Lightroom. But I won't get any updates I fear.
 

scribz

macrumors newbie
Oct 14, 2016
9
6
I just purchased the Affinity Photo on making the move to Windows last month, after having used Pixelmator on Mac. I second the comments here. Great app.
 

mintakax

macrumors regular
Original poster
Dec 19, 2013
176
24
I'm curious.
What exactly is horrifying about the transition from OSX to W10?
Unfamiliarity with basic tasks?
The aesthetics of the GUI?
An inability to adjust to a different workflow?
A VA that actually works?
How much time have you spent getting used to W10?

cortanahero+copy.jpg
The biggest issue I have is with the more "advanced" (from my noob perspective) aspects like
bios editing,regedit, driver issues,etc. I've been a UNIX user for decades so most of the stuff I've done with OSXwas easy. Replace a boot drive in OSX with a larger drive ? Piece of cake. It doesn't seem like thats the case for Windowsalthough admittedly I am totally unfamiliar with it.
 
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koyoot

macrumors 603
Jun 5, 2012
5,939
1,853
The only "gripes" I have with Windows 10 is the font shape, and the feel of the OS. It genuinely feels that it is just bits put together with tape.

Other than that, its one of best OS releases in history.
 

ActionableMango

macrumors G3
Sep 21, 2010
9,612
6,907
The main problem I have with Windows is the schizophrenic nature of configuring settings. I feel there are 16,000 places to configure something, with many duplicate efforts (made even worse with the addition of Metro), no logical organization to it, and worst of all version updates cause reshuffling/renaming of configuration such that any instructions you find online are always out of date and cannot be used to find what you are looking for.

Every time I need to change a setting I feel like it's going to be a years-long epic odyssey full of adventure and intrigue. Except without the adventure and intrigue.
 

Cassady

macrumors 6502a
Jul 7, 2012
567
205
Sqornshellous
The main problem I have with Windows is the schizophrenic nature of configuring settings. I feel there are 16,000 places to configure something, with many duplicate efforts (made even worse with the addition of Metro), no logical organization to it, and worst of all version updates cause reshuffling/renaming of configuration such that any instructions you find online are always out of date and cannot be used to find what you are looking for.

Every time I need to change a setting I feel like it's going to be a years-long epic odyssey full of adventure and intrigue. Except without the adventure and intrigue.

THIS ^^. I sometimes feel like a complete idiot looking for the most basic setting, only to find it hidden away somewhere unexpected. Remember how jarring I found the menu setup the first time I came over to OSX... But when it clicked - it's the consistency that is so empowering.
 
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mintakax

macrumors regular
Original poster
Dec 19, 2013
176
24
The main problem I have with Windows is the schizophrenic nature of configuring settings. I feel there are 16,000 places to configure something, with many duplicate efforts (made even worse with the addition of Metro), no logical organization to it, and worst of all version updates cause reshuffling/renaming of configuration such that any instructions you find online are always out of date and cannot be used to find what you are looking for.

Every time I need to change a setting I feel like it's going to be a years-long epic odyssey full of adventure and intrigue. Except without the adventure and intrigue.

Exactly !!
 
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AidenShaw

macrumors P6
Feb 8, 2003
18,667
4,676
The Peninsula
THIS ^^. I sometimes feel like a complete idiot looking for the most basic setting, only to find it hidden away somewhere unexpected. Remember how jarring I found the menu setup the first time I came over to OSX... But when it clicked - it's the consistency that is so empowering.
Trust the search....

Instead of wandering around various dialogs looking for something, change your mindset.

Windows 10 is built around pervasive search. Instead of spending time trying to find Windows Update, simply type "upd" into the search box. The first or second option is probably what you want.

Trying to find the network connections panel - just type "conn" into the search box.

Anyone who makes a complaint the she "can't find stuff" in Windows 10 is just missing the point. Typing 3 characters into the search box is really much faster than following a chain of dialogs.
 

Cassady

macrumors 6502a
Jul 7, 2012
567
205
Sqornshellous
Trust the search....

Instead of wandering around various dialogs looking for something, change your mindset.

Windows 10 is built around pervasive search. Instead of spending time trying to find Windows Update, simply type "upd" into the search box. The first or second option is probably what you want.

Trying to find the network connections panel - just type "conn" into the search box.

Anyone who makes a complaint the she "can't find stuff" in Windows 10 is just missing the point. Typing 3 characters into the search box is really much faster than following a chain of dialogs.

Not sure I'm missing the point. But yes, would hardly describe myself as someone who 'trusts the search' in Windows.


I use search to find menu items regularly on macOS - *but* that's working off the assumption one knows what one is looking for, and can think of the appropriate term to be searching for. And if one doesn't, then browsing the various options helps. But since they are scattered all over the place in many instances, that remains a PITA.
 
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mostafiz28

macrumors member
Feb 16, 2013
49
0
I have been using Windows and OS X side by side for more than a decade. At my job, we use PCs. For my freelancing jobs, I use mac. I am a professional graphic designer BTW. I use the same set of softwares (Photoshop, Illustrator, Indesign, Cinema 4D) on both platforms. The biggest issue that I have with windows is lack of previewing of my files. I have a thousand photoshop files named similarly that I need to view instantly and not open up Bridge or Photoshop to go through them one by one. There's no way to do that natively on windows. Also, explorer is faster than finder and finder isn't perfect but explorer just doesn't feel as good. As for settings, just hitting the start button and typing works, no need to type in the search box, but you have to know what you are looking for. Its not as simplistic as OS X. Also, spotlight is something that I miss on windows.
 

Cassady

macrumors 6502a
Jul 7, 2012
567
205
Sqornshellous
My biggest take-away from Windows V macOS:

The former ecosystem is geared at making you productive/efficient *inside* an app (1/2 related apps - Outlook <> OneNote).

The latter, and the extent to which third party apps can integrate at system level, is brilliant at making you more efficient/productive in your *workflow*, regardless of how many apps that might include (subject to how creative you can get).

That's experience at least. YMMV.
 

singhs.apps

macrumors 6502a
Oct 27, 2016
654
395
The latter, and the extent to which third party apps can integrate at system level, is brilliant at making you more efficient/productive in your *workflow*, regardless of how many apps that might include (subject to how creative you can get).

This is the strength of the macOS eco system. Why windows feels clunky...
 
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