Bypassing iPhone Fingerprint Reader

Discussion in 'iPhone' started by Texas_Toast, Oct 6, 2016.

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  1. Texas_Toast macrumors 6502a

    Texas_Toast

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    #1
    I have heard that iPhones have fingerprint readers on them. That makes me very nervous.

    Is there a way to disable the fingerprint reader on an iPhone 6S Plus and to just be able to use a password instead to access the phone?
     
  2. SumYoungGai macrumors 6502a

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    Jun 11, 2013
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    SF Bay Area, CA
    #2
    You must be very new to iPhone, since I've seen you creating more than a few posts about various things on an iPhone.

    Yes, there is a way to disable Touch ID for iPhone Unlock. Settings > Touch ID & Passcode > iPhone Unlock.
    Why does Touch ID make you nervous? it's convenient, secure, and fast.
     
  3. Gathomblipoob macrumors 601

    Gathomblipoob

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    #3
    May I ask what makes you nervous about them?
     
  4. LRXSE7EN macrumors member

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    Sep 20, 2016
    #4
    Lol you just now heard of this?

    If you want you could disable it so you just use a password instead but you're still going to have to press the home button to go to the home screen obviously when locked.
     
  5. C DM, Oct 6, 2016
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2016

    C DM macrumors Westmere

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    Oct 17, 2011
    #5
    TouchID doesn't have to be used if you don't want it (even a password or a passcode doesn't have to be used).

    That said, your fingerprints aren't actually stored on the phone (and the data that is stored is encrypted): http://blogs.wsj.com/digits/2013/09/11/apple-new-iphone-not-storing-fingerprints-doesnt-like-sweat/

    More information about it all from Apple can also be found at https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT204587
     
  6. Givmeabrek macrumors 68040

    Givmeabrek

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    #6
    Nervous? You think someone can copy your fingerprints on a Xerox machine and use it to access your iPhone? Or maybe cut off your thumb to get to your phone? You have been watching too many movies. :)
     
  7. Relentless Power macrumors P6

    Relentless Power

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    Jul 12, 2016
    #7
    What is it that makes you nervous? Have you previously owned an iPhone before or any other Phone with a fingerprint reader for that matter? Interesting thread.
     
  8. C DM, Oct 6, 2016
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2016

    C DM macrumors Westmere

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    #8
    http://forums.macrumors.com/threads/best-book-to-learn-iphone.2004751/
     
  9. iphone1105 macrumors 68020

    iphone1105

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    Oct 8, 2009
    #10
    shouldn't be nervous about TouchID, besides the Government already has all it wants on you anyway, they can care less about your prints, they probably already have them. Just get the phone and enjoy it. :)
     
  10. Texas_Toast thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Texas_Toast

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    #11
    Because I dont want my fingerprint being stored anywhere for security reasons!
     
  11. JayLenochiniMac macrumors G5

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    New Sanfrakota
    #13
    It's not your fingerprint being stored, but data points. It's impossible to reverse engineer your actual prints from these data points.
     
  12. lostnuke macrumors newbie

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    Sep 21, 2016
    #14
    Do you use your fingerprint for anything else? Swiss bank account?
     
  13. DrewDaHilp1 macrumors 6502a

    DrewDaHilp1

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    #15
    It's only stored on your phone. Did your parents ever take you to a finger print event? Applied for a government job?
     
  14. Texas_Toast thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Texas_Toast

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    #16
    Google "privacy and iPhone touch id"
    --- Post Merged, Oct 6, 2016 ---
    No, I think it can be reverse engineered and then used to get into all account I might use my fingerprint for.

    Again, Google this topic - it's not an irrational fear by any means
    --- Post Merged, Oct 6, 2016 ---
    Companies are too stupid, lazy and cheap to protect passwords, so why should I trust them with my fingerprint or any hash generated from it? You can't change your fingerprint if it gets compromised...
     
  15. C DM macrumors Westmere

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2011
    #17
    Not sure what the need to "Google" anything is when the information is available in the links I mentioned and the one mentioned at http://forums.macrumors.com/threads/bypassing-iphone-fingerprint-reader.2004819/#post-23678845

    Bottom line is that the answer to the question you originally posed, as has been mentioned earlier, is that you don't have to use TouchID if you don't want to (whatever your reasons might be).
     
  16. Texas_Toast thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Texas_Toast

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    #18
    You mean like I should have trusted Yahoo/AT&T with the last 10 years of my emails...
    --- Post Merged, Oct 6, 2016 ---
    My fingerprint is in too many places already - including your back door - so I think that is enough. :)
     
  17. bbrks macrumors 65816

    bbrks

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    Dec 17, 2013
    #19
    hahahahahahaha, didn't laugh so much for a very long time....hahahahahah. sorry and thank you OP :)
     
  18. DrewDaHilp1 macrumors 6502a

    DrewDaHilp1

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    #20
    Awe yeah! There better be rose petals when I get home!
     
  19. JayLenochiniMac macrumors G5

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2007
    Location:
    New Sanfrakota
    #21
    You mean like this?

    "Apple's new iPhone 5S, which comes with a fingerprint scanner, won't store actual images of users' fingerprints on the device, a company spokesman confirmed Wednesday, a decision that could ease concerns from privacy hawks.

    Rather, Apple's new Touch ID system only stores "fingerprint data," which remains encrypted within the iPhone's processor, a company representative said Wednesday.

    In practice, this means that even if someone cracked an iPhone's encrypted chip, they likely wouldn't be able to reverse engineer someone's fingerprint
    ."
     
  20. Pez555 macrumors 68000

    Pez555

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  21. deadworlds, Oct 6, 2016
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2016

    deadworlds macrumors 6502a

    deadworlds

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    Jun 15, 2007
    Location:
    Citrus Heights,CA
    #23
    If anyone actually cares to know how touch ID works, and iOS security in general, I recommend you watch this years wwdc video title "how iOS scurity really works". Somewhere around 4 minutes they start talking about the hardware security features in every iDevice.

    https://developer.apple.com/videos/play/wwdc2016/705/

    Edit: around 8:30 he starts talking about hardware encryption.

    Touch ID at 12:50.
     
  22. steve knight macrumors 68020

    steve knight

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    Jan 28, 2009
    #24
    maybe put locks on your fingers?
     
  23. VesselA macrumors regular

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    Jul 26, 2015
    #25
    Wise to be cautious about giant tech companies getting your personal data & something as sensitive as a fingerprint which can be used to convict of crime.

    It seems many are so starry eyed by tech they havent heard of news like operation PRISM. Now before snowden leaked this the same naive starry eyed ones who scoff at your conscern over the security of your personal data were scoffing at the idea of the government and private security angencies having access to your phone. Its since come out that in several countries the intelligence agencies are able to access your device cameras and record audio and visuals. And if government can access your devices and data you can be sure hackers can.

    Those who believe your data and privacy are seccure simply because the megacorps tell you it is are the ones to be scoffed at for their gullibility.
     
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