C&C for Low Light/night photos

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by finnschi, Jan 27, 2010.

  1. finnschi macrumors 6502

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    Dec 30, 2008
    Location:
    Hamburg, Germany
    #1
  2. flosseR macrumors 6502a

    flosseR

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2009
    Location:
    the cold dark north
    #2
    I like them.. nicely done... cold nights are the best to shoot .
    Personally I like AlsterSkyline the best but only because I have been there a lot.

    good work.. keep going..
    next you need to start doing multi exposures.. short for bottom, long for star trails above :D. Then combine them. Or use aND Grad in reverse, so that the lights are dimmed but the night sky is clear :D It allows you to expose longer.
     
  3. Doylem macrumors 68040

    Doylem

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    Wherever I hang my hat...
    #3
    I'd experiment with shooting a bit earlier... while there is still a little light and colour in the sky...
     
  4. Phrasikleia macrumors 601

    Phrasikleia

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    Over there------->
    #4
    Seconded.
     
  5. Edge100 macrumors 68000

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    Where am I???
    #5
  6. gnd macrumors 6502a

    gnd

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    #6
    Well, golden hour is the hour before sunset. Not exactly a night shot. What Doylem and Phrasikleia meant is to shoot after sunset, but not so late that the sky is totally dark. Try to take shots just before it gets totally dark, while the sky still has some color. If you face west the sky will have a certain glow and that's the best light for night shots.
     
  7. HarryPot macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2009
    #7
    I agree, but taking photos at night has it own beauty. It's much more difficult, but can give you some pretty nice photos.

    As for this photos, the one that I liked is the portrait. The other ones are OK, but are missing something. This photos look nice when you are shooting a building which is famous or very attractive.

    When shooting just normal "building landscapes", the golden hour, as the three poster above me said, suit the photo much better.
     
  8. finnschi thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2008
    Location:
    Hamburg, Germany
    #8

    Nice idea!! I also think that Time would be best, but I Had to work yesterday, until 9pm ... :( Today the sky was gray and it was snowing, yesterday the sky was CLEAR :D first time since... 1 month or so :eek: I am so mad I read about the hyperfocal stuff today... and not 1 day earlier :( oh well I am happy you liked them :D

    The Alster Skyline is SOO AWESOME :D I'll print it and hang it over my bed

    Hamburg Rulez :D
     
  9. Phrasikleia macrumors 601

    Phrasikleia

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2008
    Location:
    Over there------->
    #9
    No, one poster said that. Doylem, gnd, and I are referring to the afterglow following sunset, not golden hour itself. Once the sun has set, golden hour is over. It's still daylight photography so long as the sun is still in the sky.

    For example...

    (both clickable)

    GOLDEN HOUR:


    [​IMG]


    AFTERGLOW:

    [​IMG]

    Both are good times for photography and give very different results. During the afterglow, there is still blue in the sky, but the sun has set and is no longer shining direct light on anything. All of the light is then ambient, reflecting off of particles in the sky, or else it's artificial (manmade lighting). It's when the sky becomes completely black that photos start to loose visual interest.
     
  10. finnschi thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2008
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    Hamburg, Germany
    #10
    Afterglow , how much time do i have after Sunset? i am guessing 1Hour maximum? (also depends on location and date of course)
     
  11. Phrasikleia macrumors 601

    Phrasikleia

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Over there------->
    #11
    Yes, it really depends on your location and the season. Since during the afterglow you're trying to balance ambient and artificial light, you might have only about 5-10 minutes of optimal balance. When I do this kind of photography, I plan in advance, get into place, have everything set, and then take a series of photos as the light changes. I usually expect to come out with one good shot, no more.
     

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