Cable guy says router "not compatible" with my devices

Discussion in 'Mac OS X Server, Xserve, and Networking' started by miamialley, Jan 16, 2017.

  1. miamialley macrumors 68030

    miamialley

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2008
    Location:
    Los Angeles, CA
    #1
    With the modem/router below, my speeds never go over 75mb/s, despite Cox Cable saying everything looks good with the lines/connections. We previously had a Cox modem that got great speeds, up to 200mb/s. The Cox guy says this router is not "compatible" with my devices and that's why I can't get higher speeds. What is he talking about? We have a new MBP, an 4 year old Windows laptop, iPhone 7, iPhone 6, iPad Air 2, Xbox One. None of these devices register speeds over 75mb/s at any time. He says we need an AC router. Why would this modem not register speeds up to 150mb/s on any of these devices? Cable guy ran a speed test on his Android tablet and didn't go over 50mb/s.

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00IF0JAIU/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o06_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
     
  2. northernmunky, Jan 16, 2017
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2017

    northernmunky macrumors 6502a

    northernmunky

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2007
    Location:
    London, Taipei
    #2
    Its not that its not 'compatible', its that it doesnt have the capabiity because this is an 802.11n router which runs max 300mbps over 2.4Ghz (but depending on wifi traffic/placement and other factors it can run much much slower), wheras 802.11ac runs at 1300mbps over the 5Ghz band. Despite what is advertised as the capable speeds, you'd never ever actually acheive those speeds unless you are ultra perfect interference free testing environment.

    I'd say upgrade to an 802.11ac capable one.

    I don't know how it all works accross the pond, but your ISP should be supplying you with a capable router for free. If your paying for a 200mbps connection, they should be providing you with a 802.11ac router to go with it.
     
  3. winston1236 macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2010
    #3
    It's an outdated consumer model that runs the old WiFi frequency. Your newer equipment like the Macbook have the capability of connecting to the newer standard of AC (5Ghz) which is much faster than what you have now (2.4Ghz).

    I'm not sure what internet plan you have but if you pay for speeds higher than 300 you need a different modem.

    One option to get the faster WiFi is to keep what you have now and connect one of these to it:

    https://www.amazon.com/Ubiquiti-Uni...8&qid=1484592853&sr=1-2&keywords=unifi+ac+pro
     
  4. miamialley thread starter macrumors 68030

    miamialley

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    Jul 28, 2008
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    Los Angeles, CA
    #4
    I pay for 150, but don't get over 75mb/s. If the modem is rated for 300mb/s, why can't I get above 75mb/s?
    --- Post Merged, Jan 16, 2017 ---
    They definitely do not supply anything for free. This is America!
     
  5. northernmunky macrumors 6502a

    northernmunky

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    #5
    Oh yeah.. 'murica! ;)
    --- Post Merged, Jan 16, 2017 ---
    Is that router connected to your ISP's router or is the line going straight into that one?
    Hows your network traffic? Are there a lot of other networks available?
    Hows the speeds when you are positioned right next to it? Also, connect your computer via Ethernet and run test at speedtest.net bypassing the wifi. That way you can verify that you are actually getting the speed that you expect into the house at all, and therefore the wifi capability of your router is the problem.
     
  6. Weaselboy Moderator

    Weaselboy

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    #6
    That 300mbps is a theoretical max for 802.1n. In real life you are not ever going to get more than 70-80 like you are seeing. See this article.

    The Cox dude/dudette is correct. You should get a newer 802.11ac router.

    Here is Cox's approved modem list. For best results get one that supports 24 channel bonding downstream and 802.11ac.
     
  7. belvdr macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2005
    #7
    A quick way to test wireless is connect via wire. I bet going to a modem that supports more than 8x4 channels is most likely the issue.
     
  8. kiwipeso1 Suspended

    kiwipeso1

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    Sep 17, 2001
    Location:
    Wellington, New Zealand
    #8
    N is a very dated standard going back to 2007, I would suggest that you get an AC router if you want decent performance. Get one with six or eight antennas if you have a large residence/ section to cover.
     
  9. miamialley thread starter macrumors 68030

    miamialley

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2008
    Location:
    Los Angeles, CA
    #9
    Thanks for the feedback. I will upgrade. I'm still confused under what conditions I could get 300mb/s, as even hardwired I don't go over 75.
     
  10. kiwipeso1 Suspended

    kiwipeso1

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    #10
    300 megabits works out to be 75 megabytes.
    A bit is 2, a byte is 8. It's something that trips up most people who haven't worked with binary numbers.
     
  11. theluggage macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2011
    #11
    Lots of posts here have missed the point.

    There are two separate speeds to consider here - (a) the max download speed you're paying Cox for (150Mbps) and (b) the WiFi speed of your router (300Mbps) which only refers to the theoretical max speed of the WiFi link between your router and your home devices. Buying a faster router will improve (b) and give you faster communication between your home devices but your internet speeds will still be capped by (a).

    The theoretical speed of WiFi is notoriously optimistic and depends on distance, walls, neighbours, interference etc. and I wouldn't be surprised to see only 75Mbps off a 300Mbps WiFi "n" link. Getting a faster AC router will give you faster WiFi to & between any devices that support it (which includes the MBP and iPad, at least) but they won't be able to exceed the 150Mbps internet download speed that you're paying for.

    As for the 150Mbps that you're paying Cox for, though, you should be able to get much closer to that than 75Mbps (you'll need to ask around to find out how honest Cox are about speeds - here in the UK there's been a lot of pressure on ISPs not to exaggerate speeds) - just not over your current wifi.

    However, the bottleneck on the router you have only applies to WiFi - if you read the other specs it supports cable download speeds of up to 340Mbps and wired "gigabit" ethernet up to 1000Mbps, so with a hardwired connection you ought to be getting close to that 150Mbps. However, for a fair test:

    - Turn off WiFi on the computer (just to be sure)
    - If you use the PC (maybe it has Ethernet built in) check that it is 1000Mbps or "Gigabit" ethernet. If you use the Mac, you'll need a Thunderbolt-to-gigabit-ethernet dongle (or a USB 3 to gigabit dongle - not a USB2-to-10/100 ethernet)
    - Hook an ethernet cable between PC/Mac and router
    - run a broadband speed test. You should get close to the 150Mbps you're paying for.

    Long term, yeah, if you're paying for 150Mbps internet and want to hook up with WiFi then you should go for a much faster router.
     
  12. aristobrat macrumors G4

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2005
    #12
    Hmmmmm. A bit is 1, a byte is 8, so 300 megabits should be around 37.5 megabytes.
     
  13. belvdr macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2005
    #13
    If you're talking 75 megabits/second over a wire (not wireless), then you either need to upgrade your cable modem or have your ISP take a look. Upgrading your wireless will have no effect on this.

    I have TWC (Spectrum now) and with the upgrades they were coming out with, a 16x4 (16 downstream channels, 4 upstream channels) cable modem was required. Since your modem only supports 8x4, you may inquire about that with them.
     
  14. Weaselboy Moderator

    Weaselboy

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    California
    #14
    This is new information. Previously, it sounded like this was all on wifi. If you are paying for 200mbps and can only get 75 wired, then yes, it is likely because your modem cannot bond enough downstream channels to get the higher speed tier. Your modem is not even on the list I linked from Cox.
     
  15. dukeblue219 macrumors member

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2012
    #15
    It's possible miamialley has a 100mbps ethernet port. How old is the computer being attached with ethernet? If it doesn't have gigabit ethernet, or the router doesn't have gigabit ethernet, it will be limited to just under 100mbps (75 mbps probably makes sense as a real-world number).
    --- Post Merged, Jan 18, 2017 ---
    This is incorrect information. A byte is almost always (though it doesn't have to be) 8 bits in modern usage. A bit is ALWAYS one piece of information.
     
  16. Weaselboy Moderator

    Weaselboy

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    #16
    The Netgear modem/router OP linked has GB ethernet. Dunno how he is connected to various client devices though.
     
  17. cvdave macrumors newbie

    cvdave

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    Oct 2, 2016
    #17
    Sounds like people are confusing two different devices here.

    In the United States, Cox Communications does supply the MODEM (for a fee), or you can buy your own. HOWEVER, it has to meet DOCSIS 3.0 standards (they deprecated use of DOCSIS 2.0 a year or two ago). If you are still using a DOCSIS 2.0 router, you will not/cannot get maximum speed from the current Cox Network.

    The other device is your ROUTER.... and it has to be a 1000BASE-T (or better), most older routers are only 100BASE-T which max out at 100megbits per second. And Cox does not (at least where I am) provide a ROUTER......

    So BOTH devices need to be up to current standards in order to get the best you are paying for .

    My Cox plan is only 50meg.... and note that is DOWNLOAD speed ..... upload is usually about 1/10th that

    Right now I get 59meg Down, and 6.3 up.... well within the advertised specs.
     
  18. Weaselboy Moderator

    Weaselboy

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    #18
    There is no confusion at all. OP is using a Netgear N300 cable modem/router combo device and it is linked in the first post.
     
  19. cvdave macrumors newbie

    cvdave

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    Oct 2, 2016
    #19
    And this particular modem is NOT on the Cox list of compatible modems... as a matter of fact, the only Netgear devices on the list are in the "C" series..

    And if the OP has the "Ultimate" package, they need a 16x4 channel device, the N300 is an 8x4


    http://www.cox.com/residential/supp...rticleId=b2ec95d0-7ef9-11df-5590-000000000000
     
  20. Weaselboy Moderator

    Weaselboy

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    #20
  21. belvdr macrumors 603

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    #21
    Agreed, this is what has been said before.

    You and I have a knack for replying at the same time. :)
     
  22. Weaselboy Moderator

    Weaselboy

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    #22
    Greats minds... something something something... :D
     
  23. kiwipeso1 Suspended

    kiwipeso1

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    Location:
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    #23
    Yes, and if you had worked with binary long enough to understand one piece of information is always one of two parts, then you would state it is either 0 or 1 in a base 2 system. You are getting confused with the digit 1 indicating a different value in decimal to binary. Here ends the maths lesson I had 37 years ago at age 3.

    Second correction, gigabit ethernet has been around since 1999 or so, and it is highly unlikely that the ethernet is only 100mb. Which brings it back to 300mb connection reported as 75mb at his end, which is most likely due to connection rates at the websites and rest of internet he is accessing, as of course we all know that you can't get 100% dedicated connection from online services, and hence there will be some inefficiencies as the other services operate at their speed and traffic load rate.
     
  24. bopajuice macrumors 6502a

    bopajuice

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2016
    #24
    I have a router that does 802.11n and 802.11ac. With 802.11n I don't get any speeds past the 20's. As others have said you need a router with 802.11ac. Most of the devices in your list will run AC with the exception of maybe the 4 year old PC. You can always ad a USB WiFi adapter to the PC.

    With an 802.11ac router connected at 5 ghz I get in the 100 to 160 range. Get a dual band or Tri-band router, that way you are getting full throughput to each device. The only draw back with the 5 ghz channel is the farther away from the unit you are the slower it gets.
     
  25. theluggage macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2011
    #25
    From your earlier post:

    Sorry, you're the one tripping up here.

    A bit is on or off. It has 2 states: the binary digits 0 and 1
    A byte is a sequence 8 bits which, together has 256 states (the binary numbers 00000000 to 11111111)
    300 megabits can consist at most of 300/8 = 37.5 megabytes (not your value of 75!)
    However, turning bytes into serial data always have overheads, so just be lazy and divide by 10.

    NB: I think @dukeblue219's point was that although some ancient computers used 4,6 or 7 bit "bytes" instead of 8, a bit is always a single bit. So, on that thought, let's not dwell on what the prefix "mega" might mean in this context... :)

    Anyway, I think subsequent posts have established that (a) the thread starter is only paying for 150mbps broadband, so they ain't gonna get 300mbps, (b) the specs of the router they have show it should be capable of both 150mbps broadband and 1Gbps wired ethernet and (c) they don't say how they got that 75gbps over-a-wire figure.

    A 4-year-old PC laptop probably has 1Gbps ethernet but its not impossible that it is only 10/100 and a USB2.0 dongle will definitely only be 10/100. The MBP will need a dongle, and although a modern USB3 or USBC one should be 1Gb, Apple have made 10/100 dongles in the past.

    However, since the thread starter seems to be hitting the 75Mbps wall fairly consistently across wired and wireless I'd guess that it was the broadband connection acting up or mis-configured.
     

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