Calling all med students

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by tktaylor1, Feb 24, 2012.

  1. tktaylor1 macrumors 6502a

    tktaylor1

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    #1
    I just recently decided to change my major from nursing to pre-med. I am starting this thread to get some feedback from fellow forum members about their experience through med school. I am still an undergrad in case that matters for some reason. Could you tell me where you went to school, where you did your residency, and where you did your fellowship. How much debt did you obtain? What classes did you take throughout med school? What did you do during residency? I am wanting to be a radiologist, so if anyone here is a radiologist that would be awesome. I've always wanted to be a radiologist, its just med school scared me a bit. I decided to man up and go for it. Anyways, any insight would be appreciated.
     
  2. Daffodil macrumors 6502

    Daffodil

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    #3
    I'm sure others can tell you much more about their experiences as doctors/residents etc. so I'll focus on the application process, because that's your first real hurdle...

    Try to get a shadowing position with a radiologist if you haven't already. Not only will it give you a better idea of whether radiology really is for you, but even if you decide it isn't, it shows that you've given serious thought to your decision and know how actually doctors work (not just some fantasy based on popular tv shows).

    Applying to med school is a royal pain, so embrace anything that can make it easier. Start researching schools and whatever special programs you might be interested in. Look into what resources you school's career center has to offer to assist you with the process. Mine had everything from individual counseling to interview practice sessions.

    If you have money saved, consider signing up for an MCAT prep class. This isn't really necessary if you're excellent at managing your own time and make a good schedule and stick to it. But if you think you might be tempted to put off studying, the class might make a big difference. Grades and test scores aren't everything, but in order to get that interview and show them how wonderful a person you are, they need to be above a certain threshold.

    Good luck! It's a pretty exhausting road to go!
     
  3. tktaylor1 thread starter macrumors 6502a

    tktaylor1

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    #4
    No. Biology will be my major. I just worded that part wrong. I am switching from nursing to pre-med.
     
  4. eric/ Guest

    eric/

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    Ohio, United States
    #5
    Are you going to graduate with a 4.0 in biology? If not, you should take all the required courses for entrance into medical school, but major in something else unless of course you're REALLY interested in biology.

    also, nothing is more important than getting volunteer hours and/or internship experience during your entire college tenure. I'm not talking like oh I volunteer at the human society every other weekend, I'm talking volunteering at the hospital, handing out snacks to patients on a meal cart, doing stuff like that. Unless you can get a gig actually interning for a doctor.
     
  5. tktaylor1 thread starter macrumors 6502a

    tktaylor1

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    #6
    Thanks for the reply. I am looking at schools already. Vanderbilt is on the top of my list since I am from Nashville. The only thing is Vanderbilt doesn't do radiology in their residency. Which brings me to my next question, if I want to be a radiologist, do I have to go to a school that offers radiology in their residency? Or can I go somewhere else for my residency? I am still a little confused on the whole process as you can tell. If I can't go to Vanderbilt, I want to go somewhere in the Boston or Chicago area. I know BostonU has a good program but I read some bad reviews from former students. Northwestern is always on the list as a good school, along with the UofChicgo. I can manage my time very well. My first year of college was a huge mistake and it taught me a good lesson. I know a lot of people that work for Vanderbilt hospital so I could try to talk to them about shadowing a radiologist in the future because I will be moving out of the Nashville area to finish my undergrad.

    ----------

    Most programs I have looked at require you to major in Biology or Chemistry. The college I will be attending to finish out my undergrad requires 8 hours of Organic Chemistry, 8 hours of Inorganic Chemistry, 8 hours of Physics. Calculus, 8 hours of Biology, 8 hours of Psychology, etc. I would rather major in Biology because it will help in the long run. Will I graduate with a 4.0 in Biology, nope. I will most likely graduate with somewhere around a 3.75 if I manage my time right and do well. As I said in my previous post, my first year killed my GPA and now I am having to work my ass off to get it back up. I had to take 18 hours in both semesters of my freshman year and I think it was way too much. Thats what the school required for nursing majors.

    Biology related classes are what I am best at.
     
  6. eric/ Guest

    eric/

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    #7
    I've never heard of biology and/or chemistry being required for medical school. In fact, from what I've seen it's usually not really an advantage, and perhaps a bit of a disadvantage to major in biology, compared to majoring in, perhaps, philosophy or a foreign language. Of course if what you want to major in is biology because that's what you enjoy, by all means, do so . But don't major in it because you think it'll give you an advantage. It won't.

    Also, how you did your freshman year isn't a big deal. The admissions office will take into consideration, and perhaps it will be advantageous, that you have gone from not so well, to getting your butt in gear and doing a lot better by the time you're a senior.

    And not to discourage you, but if you think the 18 hours required by the nursing college was tough, it's only going to get harder, WAY harder in med school.
     
  7. tktaylor1 thread starter macrumors 6502a

    tktaylor1

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    #8
    I am aware it will get way harder but now I know how to cope. My GPA dropped into the 2 range my freshman year. I now have it back in to the 3 range. I would like to be fluent in German or some foreign language by the time I get to med school.
     
  8. eric/ Guest

    eric/

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    #9
    Than major in German, and simply complete the required courses necessary for entrance into medical school. It'll look better than a biology major.
     
  9. Daffodil macrumors 6502

    Daffodil

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    #10
    Nope, residencies involve yet another round of applications/interviews, and chances are good that you will end up in a different location. What you should look at are the clerkships offered as part of the program (generally 3rd/4th year curriculum). Incidentally, the MSAR has stats (I think) for what residencies students from a given school end up in, so you can take a look at that to boost your chances of getting a good radiology residency afterwards.

    If bio is what you like, I say stick with bio. Imo, another benefit is that it's a degree where you pretty easily can get a job afterwards (depending upon your location/interests) should you change your mind about medicine or decide to take a gap year.
     
  10. tktaylor1 thread starter macrumors 6502a

    tktaylor1

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    #11
    I really like A&P. It was my favorite class in high school, and is still my favorite class(es) in college. Would being fluent in a foreign language help at all on my entrance? I am just wondering if it will be worth my while. If it doesn't, I still might take classes for fun--or Rosetta Stone.
     
  11. eric/ Guest

    eric/

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    #12
    Yes it'll help. It shows that you're "worldly" and disciplined in understanding people. Also, it is always good to know more than one language.
     
  12. fireshot91 macrumors 601

    fireshot91

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    #13
    If you really want to, take classes for fun.


    Major in some sort of science (Bio Engineering, Chemical Engineering, something of that sort). Then, go for medical school. Even if you don't get in, you still have a great major, and you can work for a LOT of companies.
     
  13. Daffodil macrumors 6502

    Daffodil

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    #14
    Being fluent in another language certainly won't harm you ;) Shows perseverance in working towards a goal. You could consider a minor/double-major if you really love it.

    And at least in my opinion, college is one of your best chances to become a well-rounded person. Take advantage of that opportunity, because it'll benefit you regardless of what your future career is. GEs aren't just there to make your degree take longer! :p I took a lot of classes in college that weren't strictly necessary, and loved it! Although most schools have an upper limit for units, there should still be plenty of wiggle-room if you're willing to put in the extra work...
     
  14. kellen macrumors 68020

    kellen

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    #15
    Unless you have a real desire for German, I would recommend Spanish. It is the most common foreign language I run into at work. That said being fluent isn't necessary and you can get by 95% of the time with knowing select words, depending on your specialty. However those other times when you can not and need to call the language line will be so worth it to have known spanish.
     
  15. tktaylor1 thread starter macrumors 6502a

    tktaylor1

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    #16
    I know Spanish is the best choice but I really hate that language for some reason.
     
  16. tktaylor1 thread starter macrumors 6502a

    tktaylor1

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    #17
    So after doing research today I realized I not going to major in Biology or Chemistry. I found out as long as you have these required classes you're fine: 2 semesters of general chemistry, 2 semesters of organic chemistry, 2 semesters of physics, 2 semesters of biology, 2 semesters of english, and 1 semester of calculus.

    I think I am going to major in some kind of foreign language. I would really like German but the school I am transferring to doesn't offer that. I really don't like Spanish so I might major in French or some other foreign language. Might do some study abroad stuff too, I read that was helpful for some reason.
     
  17. weidanielb macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2011
    #18
    Just to provide some additional info on the MCAT, having just been accepted to my state school; I would highly recommended taking in addition to your required pre-med classes biochem and human pays or some equivalent. The material in these two classes will prepare you very well for the Bio section of the MCAT. More generally, I would recommended taking relevant coursework closer to your test date. I planned my classes so that I would not have to spend as much time relearning material, as I had just taken the classes. That being said, I was able to study for roughly 21 days and got a 35.
    As to whether or not you should take an MCAT course, I agree with the above posters since it really is up to you and your work ethic. I opted for a more passive studying process and chose to save the $2000 for a course. If you do choose to take a course, however, I would recommend the Princeton Review course. I studied almost exclusively from their Hyperlearning Science Workbook I received secondhand.
    In choosing med schools to apply to, don't make the mistake that I made and choose your schools based on a combination of U.S. News Rankings and where your MCAT scores and GPA fall in the mix. You'll find that it's much more important to find a school that you would truly enjoy being in.
    Finally, may I recommended creating an account at the Student Doctor Network? You'll find a wealth of information from people who are going through the same thing you are and will probably have better luck than asking here.

    I think you've made a great career choice and wish you the best of luck!:D:D:D
     

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