Came from a 2009 MBP to 2018 MBA...how do I use this trackpad?

Anthony T

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Jul 10, 2008
979
76
So I got the new MacBook Air, coming from a 2009 13" MacBook Pro. It seems like a lot has changed from the trackpad 9 years ago, to the current models. I am trying to figure out how the hell do I drag and drop an item with this thing? I simply want to drag something into the recycle bin or into a folder.

I Googled and the only thing I can really find is "how to enable 3 finger drag and drop" which I also don't know how to use and seems a little inefficient.

Help please! Lol
 

KPOM

macrumors G5
Oct 23, 2010
14,392
2,990
Just do as you always did. The trackpad doesn’t actually move but the feedback is very impressive.
 

DDustiNN

macrumors 68000
Jan 27, 2011
1,989
807
You just... click and drag. Press down slightly on the trackpad until you feel the click, then drag.

I'm not sure how the 2009 trackpad is, but if it's like other older laptops where you just "tap" to click, this isn't like that (at least by default). It's an actual, tactile response (think of clicking a mouse button). And it's the best trackpad you'll ever use.

Beyond that, I highly suggest watching the built-in movies as suggested above. The multi-touch gestures in Mac OS X are simply fantastic, and you'll be amazed at how useful they are. It really changes the way you use your computer, and for the better.
 

digger10

macrumors member
Sep 12, 2014
66
50
You just... click and drag. Press down slightly on the trackpad until you feel the click, then drag.

I'm not sure how the 2009 trackpad is, but if it's like other older laptops where you just "tap" to click, this isn't like that (at least by default). It's an actual, tactile response (think of clicking a mouse button). And it's the best trackpad you'll ever use.

Beyond that, I highly suggest watching the built-in movies as suggested above. The multi-touch gestures in Mac OS X are simply fantastic, and you'll be amazed at how useful they are. It really changes the way you use your computer, and for the better.
I think the OP wants to change to tap-to-click to replicate the 2009 behaviour. In which case System Prefs > Trackpad > Point & Click > 3rd tick-box down will turn this on and off.
 

DDustiNN

macrumors 68000
Jan 27, 2011
1,989
807
I think the OP wants to change to tap-to-click to replicate the 2009 behaviour. In which case System Prefs > Trackpad > Point & Click > 3rd tick-box down will turn this on and off.
I wouldn’t recommend it as it can lead to accidental clicks. It’s better left disabled.
 
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Anthony T

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Jul 10, 2008
979
76
You just... click and drag. Press down slightly on the trackpad until you feel the click, then drag.

I'm not sure how the 2009 trackpad is, but if it's like other older laptops where you just "tap" to click, this isn't like that (at least by default). It's an actual, tactile response (think of clicking a mouse button). And it's the best trackpad you'll ever use.

Beyond that, I highly suggest watching the built-in movies as suggested above. The multi-touch gestures in Mac OS X are simply fantastic, and you'll be amazed at how useful they are. It really changes the way you use your computer, and for the better.
On my old MBP, you would just hover over the icon/file you want to drag, press down on the trackpad and drag it wherever. It seems more difficult to do on this trackpad, but I guess I will have to get used to it. I changed some settings last night and it seems to be a little easier.
 

KPOM

macrumors G5
Oct 23, 2010
14,392
2,990
On my old MBP, you would just hover over the icon/file you want to drag, press down on the trackpad and drag it wherever. It seems more difficult to do on this trackpad, but I guess I will have to get used to it. I changed some settings last night and it seems to be a little easier.
It should work the same way. Note that there are actually two levels of "Force Click." If you press down and hear/feel a "click" and then press down harder, you might hear/feel a second click. That brings up a contextual menu in some circumstances (I've rarely used it). For "right clicking" you can use two fingers as before.

It didn't take me long to get used to the trackpads (which first debuted in the 2015 MacBook). For me, it really feels like the trackpad is clicking, even though it is just haptic feedback.