iPhone XR Camera: X or XR?

PeytonT123

macrumors regular
Original poster
Oct 17, 2018
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Other than the extra lens/using zoom.....if you're just taking a regular picture. Which camera is better, the X or the XR?

I was trying to compare and it did seem like the XR's pictures looked better, but it was hard to tell. Of course the XS is better but yeah.
 
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agente46

macrumors regular
Sep 12, 2014
135
168
Don't believe the hype. Slightly better but you lose the zoom.
30% Larger sensor (better image quality and light sensitively. Most important part of a camera)
Portrait editing (depth control, studio, contour, stage, mono)
Smart HDR

Those are not “slightly better” specs
 
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Relentless Power

macrumors Nehalem
Jul 12, 2016
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30% Larger sensor (better image quality and light sensitively. Most important part of a camera)
Portrait editing (depth control, studio, contour, stage, mono)
Smart HDR

Those are not “slightly better” specs
That 30% larger sensor definitely makes a difference, I think a lot of consumers don’t know that, but being that the image quality is improved, it definitely allows more absorbency of light for the picture.
 

Shanghaichica

macrumors G4
Apr 8, 2013
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The main camera on the XR is significantly better than the main camera on the X. However the X does have the telephoto lens which takes better portrait pictures and has a 2 X zoom.
 

AppleHaterLover

macrumors 68000
Jun 15, 2018
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You'd be surprised to see that the telephoto lens is used FAR less than you'd think.

Under anything less than ideal lighting conditions, the phone will switch to cropping the main camera - and it won't tell you! You can try this by covering the telephoto lens and switching between 1x and 2x.

Also - the telephoto lens sucks in low light and it must be used for portrait - low-light portrait photos (of people) are a LOT worse on the X/XS than on the XR.

Get the X if you like taking portrait pictures of things (not people). For literally everything else, XR it is.
 

JPack

macrumors 601
Mar 27, 2017
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30% Larger sensor (better image quality and light sensitively. Most important part of a camera)
Portrait editing (depth control, studio, contour, stage, mono)
Smart HDR

Those are not “slightly better” specs
These things are most visible with low light photos. Light sources in night shots on the X look like blobs. On 2018 iPhones, light sources are far more defined.
 

fred98tj

macrumors 6502a
Jul 9, 2017
548
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Central Luzon, Philippines
That 30% larger sensor definitely makes a difference, I think a lot of consumers don’t know that, but being that the image quality is improved, it definitely allows more absorbency of light for the picture.
“absorbency of light” ???

Sensor size has nothing to do with exposure. Digital photo sensors are not solar arrays nor do they act like a window in a house (a larger window lets more light into the house).
 

Relentless Power

macrumors Nehalem
Jul 12, 2016
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“absorbency of light” ???

Sensor size has nothing to do with exposure. Digital photo sensors are not solar arrays nor do they act like a window in a house (a larger window lets more light into the house).
You definitely didn’t understand what I meant, at least by the example you’re using for solar arrays. The Exposure isn’t what creates the contrast for the photo, Not light absorbency with the sensor itself, but permitting light to contribute to the definition of the photo for a better photo, especially in situations where the light may be restricted, it certainly contributes to allow the photo to be more refined.
 

fred98tj

macrumors 6502a
Jul 9, 2017
548
362
Central Luzon, Philippines
You definitely didn’t understand what I meant, at least by the example you’re using for solar arrays. The Exposure isn’t what creates the contrast for the photo, Not light absorbency with the sensor itself, but permitting light to contribute to the definition of the photo for a better photo, especially in situations where the light may be restricted, it certainly contributes to allow the photo to be more refined.
Sensor size has nothing to do with contrast. “Light restricted” ?? Either you’re talking aperture (as in small, that’s exposure) or low light (which would also equate to exposure).
Contrast is largely determined by the scene and the quality of the lens (the tonal transmission of light of the lens). You’ll never see a test of a camera system that say the contrast is great because of the large sensor. You will see test of lenses that say a particular lens has great contrast (inertonal transmission of light).
 
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Relentless Power

macrumors Nehalem
Jul 12, 2016
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Either you’re talking aperture (as in small, that’s exposure) or low light (which would also equate to exposure).
Yes, Aperture, That’s the word I’m not using properly here. But the light itself overall provides more definition to the actual photo given the contrast.
 

fred98tj

macrumors 6502a
Jul 9, 2017
548
362
Central Luzon, Philippines
Yes, Aperture, That’s the word I’m not using properly here. But the light itself overall provides more definition to the actual photo given the contrast.
Aperture (and shutter speed of course) control exposure. Again, sensor size has nothing to do with exposure. “Total light” (as some people try to say and I think maybe what you are thinking) has nothing to do with exposure. Exposure is per square unit area, example: per square mm, and it’s irrelevant how many square mm’s a sensor has (sensor size).
You’re confused about how sensors work, confusing sensor size, number of pixels, pixel pitch (size), etc.
 

Relentless Power

macrumors Nehalem
Jul 12, 2016
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“Total light” (as some people try to say and I think maybe what you are thinking) has nothing to do with exposure.
No, This is not what I’m saying at all and you’re equally just as confused, Aperture Focuses on the exposure, which we already elaborated on. You mentioned total light, that’s nothing to do exactly with what I meant by the exposure, The contrast itself is not controlled by the light, (Nor the sensor) but by the scene that we already know based off it is greater, because it’s equally as important as a counterpart to having a larger sensor for a better photo based off the lighting conditions, and contrast plays a role in this.
 
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agente46

macrumors regular
Sep 12, 2014
135
168
“absorbency of light” ???

Sensor size has nothing to do with exposure. Digital photo sensors are not solar arrays nor do they act like a window in a house (a larger window lets more light into the house).
Sensor size doesn’t change exposure, but the larger sensor does indeed gather more light due to the size. I’m not talking about each individual photo sensor but a larger sensor has more photo sensors thus capturing more light.

https://newatlas.com/camera-sensor-size-guide/26684/
 
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