can a cpu be upgraded? or over clocked?

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by bereda, Mar 11, 2009.

  1. bereda macrumors member

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    #1
    i have an intel core duo but i have a new intel i7 on the way for my desktop which brought the idea to mind? right now im running windows xp and im wondering if its possible to overclock the cpu also... im a newb when it comes to over clocking and macs in general but i can build desktops like theres no tomorrow so i know the componants but i just dont know what to use for macs are all of the componants the same in a mac and a pc? and its just the os thats different...
     
  2. Tallest Skil macrumors P6

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  3. Sneakz macrumors 65816

    Sneakz

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    #3
    CPU upgraded? Technically? Yes. Practically? No. They can be overclocked by using nTune in Windows XP, Vista or 7.
     
  4. bereda thread starter macrumors member

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    whats the safest OC'd speed for a duo
     
  5. diamond.g macrumors 603

    diamond.g

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    In a notebook? Not much past what it is at stock, due to potential cooling issues. But in a desktop it wouldn't surprise me if the CPUs Apple uses could hit 3.5+ Ghz on air. It would be interesting to see if that can be done without voltmodding though.
     
  6. Tallest Skil macrumors P6

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    Uh... they use the exact same CPUs in their desktops as they do the MacBook family.
     
  7. diamond.g macrumors 603

    diamond.g

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    Sorry, meant a tower unit. Like the Mac Pro. The cooling in the iMac probably can't handle the existing chips running near 4Ghz on air (especially if you have to volt mod).
     
  8. Sneakz macrumors 65816

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    I didn't realize that you weren't using a unibody. In that case, I don't think you can overlcok the CPU. I know it's possible with those that have 9400M graphics.
     
  9. Tallest Skil macrumors P6

    Tallest Skil

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    Hmm... We'll have to see about that. The Nehalem family can be overclocked fairly easily, but whether or not Gainestown is made to do so is another question.
     
  10. Sneakz macrumors 65816

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    I think he meant that if you were to take the laptop Core 2 Duo processors that are used in the MacBook Pros and OC'd them (like on a desktop motherboard) that they would overclock well.
     
  11. Tallest Skil macrumors P6

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    Naw, he said that he meant the Mac Pro ones.

    You can't put laptop chips in a desktop motherboard.
     
  12. Sneakz macrumors 65816

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    You can provided they are Socket P and not 775 or 1366 like the desktop processors. Search Google for Socket P motherboards. Many exist. Not sure if there are any that support Penryn processors though.
     
  13. diamond.g macrumors 603

    diamond.g

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    Lol, Sneakz was correct. The mobile CPUs were quite popular to use for overclocking due to much lower thermals. What I was saying is you can't do that in a notebook (or much in an AIO) due to the thermal requirements exceeding the cooling capability. So while it is technically possible to OC the CPUs you aren't going to gain much before you start seeing thermal artifacts and lockups. It is worse if you have to overvolt to get a good overclock.


    When I mentioned the Mac Pro I was using it as an example of the kind of cooling system one needs to get good overclocks on air.
     

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