Can anyone make sense of this for me?

Discussion in 'macOS' started by dbmontana, Dec 16, 2013.

  1. dbmontana macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2013
    #1
    My computer shuts off before booting into the OS. Tried running fsck and got this…can anyone make sense of it? Also, is there any way to restore the OS (formatted for all I care) without a disc..and will that fix the problem?

    Here’s the message I got;

    /dev/rdisk0s2
    Root file system
    Executing fsck_hfs (version diskdev_cmds-491 .6~3).
    Checking Journaled HFS Plus volume.
    Checking extents overflow file.
    Checking catalog file.
    Invalid sibling link
    (4, 7543)
    Rebuilding catalog B-tree.
    Disk full error
    The volume Macintosh HD could not be repaired.
    /dev/rdisk0s2 (hfs) EXITED WITH SIGNAL 8

    Anyone who can help is a friggin’ saint!
     
  2. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 3, 2009
    Location:
    Boston
    #2
    I could be wrong but that is usually indicative of a hard drive going south. Back up your data and get a product like disk warrior to see if you the software can repair it.
     
  3. Weaselboy Moderator

    Weaselboy

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2005
    Location:
    California
    #3
    You very likely have a drive there that is dying.

    You will need to at a minimum reformat the drive and reinstall everything, hopefully from a backup. Even after that, if the drive is dying this will happen again.

    What year/model is your machine and what OS version are you on? What kind of backup do you have? Do you have a Time Machine backup?

    I have seen forum member report the app Disk Warrior can fix that b-tree error, but it is not free.
     
  4. dbmontana thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2013
    #4
    I don't have a back up and it's unfortunate, but at this point it would be nice to be able to save the computer. I can access the files on my harddrive through commands in single user mode so I know the files are still there. I was thinking the OS went corrupt?

    its a MBP Model No. A1286 15.4 inch
     
  5. Weaselboy Moderator

    Weaselboy

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2005
    Location:
    California
    #5
    The OS likely is corrupted, but because the drive is bad. Reinstalling the OS on this bad drive is not going to fix it.

    What year? That A1286 was made several years. If it a 2011+ you can install a new drive then just command-option-r boot to Internet Recovery to format a new drive and reinstall the OS.
     
  6. Fishrrman macrumors G3

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2009
    #6
    [[ I can access the files on my harddrive through commands in single user mode so I know the files are still there. I was thinking the OS went corrupt? ]]

    I wouldn't condemn the hard drive as "dying" just because it will no longer boot the OS.
    It's possible to have a corrupted, non-booting OS on a still-working-fine drive.

    What you REALLY NEED at this point is a second, external, bootable drive. If you had one of these, you would be able to boot and see if the old drive was mountable on the desktop (again, it doesn't have to be "bootable" to be MOUNTable). Then you could get your files off it, and re-initialize it and restore, or replace it, or whatever.

    Since you have a MacBook Pro, it may be easy to open the rear panel and change out hard drives, if need be. YOU WILL NEED THE PROPER TOOLS to do this (shouting intentional). See "ifixit.com" for guides on how to access the internal drive.

    Here's what I'd suggest to help get you going again. It will cost a little money, but prove VERY useful to you in the future:

    - Get yourself a USB3/SATA docking station. They cost less than $25 and come in handy for all sorts of drive-related situations. I'd suggest this:
    http://plugable.com/products/pss-dd1
    or this:
    http://plugable.com/products/USB3-SATA-U3
    (Disclaimer: I have no financial interest with plugable other than being a paying customer)

    - Get a 2.5" drive of your choice, either an HDD or an SSD. I would recommend an SSD if the drive inside your MBP is user-replaceable (depends on which version of the MBP you have). An SSD will "breathe new life" into a laptop that previously had an HDD.

    You can put the drive into the dock, connect it to the MBP.
    Do you have a recovery partition on the MBP?
    It may be possible to boot to the RP and do a fresh install of the system onto the docked drive (you need to initialize it first with Disk Utility).
    Did your MBP come with any System DVDs? If so, you could use them to install a fresh OS onto the docked drive (even if it's an older version of the System, it will "get you bootable" again)
     

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