Can control the height of iMac 27?

galaksy

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Apr 19, 2014
298
0
Is there some sort of holding thing that you can control to slide it up and down?
 

DeltaMac

macrumors G4
Jul 30, 2003
10,124
2,638
Delaware
No, the iMac has a tilt adjustment, but not height.
If you need a different height, then you can decide how to do that on your own, sitting on a block to raise the height, or using an opening of some kind to give you a lower display height.
If you need more versatility, then using a VESA mount CAN be an option, if you want to purchase the iMac with that modification: http://store.apple.com/us/buy-mac/imac-vesa
One disadvantage is that VESA mount iMac does NOT come with a stand - only the adapter.
 

Thermonuclear

macrumors 6502
May 23, 2009
362
21
Why can't Apple offer an iMac which has both a stand and also mount points for a VESA attachment? Every single flat screen television from small to large I've seen has such. Making VESA capability standard would add only a few millimeters to a iMacs thickness...

Oops, forgive for I have just sinned against Apple's Holy Dogma of Stylish But Useless Thinness...

For penance, over the next month I'll use no mouse other than Apple's Stylish Circular Hockey Puck Mouse of Non-Directionality.
 

rambo47

macrumors 6502a
Oct 3, 2010
648
139
Denville, NJ
Purchase an iMac with the VESA Mount.
Or just put a base under the iMac. You could bang one together with wood in about 5 minutes, paint it or stain it, and you're good. Leave the front open and you have some extra storage for an external hard drive, superdrive, or for an iPhone charging station.

 

monokakata

macrumors 68000
May 8, 2008
1,893
413
Freeville, NY
Or just put a base under the iMac. You could bang one together with wood in about 5 minutes, paint it or stain it, and you're good. Leave the front open and you have some extra storage for an external hard drive, superdrive, or for an iPhone charging station.
True, but this solution and others like it are one-way streets. Up, up and up.

Some people like a screen lower to the desk than the iMac permits. They're out of luck.
 

DeltaMac

macrumors G4
Jul 30, 2003
10,124
2,638
Delaware
True, but this solution and others like it are one-way streets. Up, up and up.

Some people like a screen lower to the desk than the iMac permits. They're out of luck.
I would disagree. That solution is just a simple shelf.
You can also, just as easily, build a sort-of under shelf, which would support the foot under the level of the desk. I've seen a few that were home-built, since Apple began using the "foot". It's not too difficult to knock something together that would serve that function. It's not necessarily as simple as raising the foot, but do-able.
 

rambo47

macrumors 6502a
Oct 3, 2010
648
139
Denville, NJ
True, but this solution and others like it are one-way streets. Up, up and up.

Some people like a screen lower to the desk than the iMac permits. They're out of luck.
Lower??? Mine sits 2 1/2 inches off my desktop on the regular stand that comes attached. :eek:
 

Outrigger

macrumors 68000
Dec 22, 2008
1,760
93
Hmmm...

Why do you feel the mini is weak compared to the iMac? If your main need is around a dedicated GPU then, I got you, but otherwise the MacMini is stronger.
the mini doesn't offer an all SSD option. its not just about the lack of a GPU, that's why its the cheapest mac.
 

monokakata

macrumors 68000
May 8, 2008
1,893
413
Freeville, NY
Lower??? Mine sits 2 1/2 inches off my desktop on the regular stand that comes attached. :eek:
Which iMac do you have? How far from the desk is the bottom of the screen?

I'm talking about the screen, not the device.

It's a serious question, not an invitation to argue. The only iMac I have around to look at is a old 24", and its screen begins just under 6" from the desk. I think its chin is taller than the new ones, so maybe the screen's lower on the newer ones.
 

monokakata

macrumors 68000
May 8, 2008
1,893
413
Freeville, NY
I would disagree. That solution is just a simple shelf.
You can also, just as easily, build a sort-of under shelf, which would support the foot under the level of the desk. I've seen a few that were home-built, since Apple began using the "foot". It's not too difficult to knock something together that would serve that function. It's not necessarily as simple as raising the foot, but do-able.
You mean an under-shelf at the back of the desk? Or do you mean cutting a opening in the desk and placing a shelf below?

I suppose a back shelf would be easy enough. What happens to fore-and-aft motion with the back shelf? Cut into the desk or table top?

Will C-clamps be involved? When I was in the timing business we had a whole range of make-it-work technologies that we generically called "C-clamp solutions." But typically these were temporary outside problem to be solved.

"do-able" covers a wide range. I have a good woodshop and some experience and I could do that quickly enough. But what about the person in a dorm or a small apartment or the person who's not at all handy, has no tools, and so on?

I accept that Apple makes design decisions on other grounds than ergonomics, and that overwhelmingly, people who want Macs (as I do) buy them and put up with the lack of meaningful adjustments.

But maybe I'm missing something.
 

DeltaMac

macrumors G4
Jul 30, 2003
10,124
2,638
Delaware
You mean an under-shelf at the back of the desk? Or do you mean cutting a opening in the desk and placing a shelf below?

I suppose a back shelf would be easy enough. What happens to fore-and-aft motion with the back shelf? Cut into the desk or table top?

Will C-clamps be involved? When I was in the timing business we had a whole range of make-it-work technologies that we generically called "C-clamp solutions." But typically these were temporary outside problem to be solved.

"do-able" covers a wide range.
...
I only mentioned that because you used the term "out of luck", which I know to be inaccurate.
Yes, I have a couple of acquaintances that modified desks, cutting large openings, and in one case, using a multi-adjustable desktop which I actually still have in my basement. It takes up a large amount of floor space, and was sold with all that adjustment, using a central well with two different adjustable surfaces, and "wings" extending to left and right, filling an "L" shape. Made originally for a 20-inch CRT, so really big - but is a great fit if one needs an iMac to sit under the level of the desktop. It will even allow a keyboard shelf to sit above the bottom edge of the display.
Not an item that will be practical for everybody, but gives a huge amount of versatility when needed.
Not something that I would purchase NOW, but I've had since I bought that PowerMac 6400 that I bought before the first iMac was sold.
There's always solutions - but some may not be practical.
 

rambo47

macrumors 6502a
Oct 3, 2010
648
139
Denville, NJ
Which iMac do you have? How far from the desk is the bottom of the screen?

I'm talking about the screen, not the device.

It's a serious question, not an invitation to argue. The only iMac I have around to look at is a old 24", and its screen begins just under 6" from the desk. I think its chin is taller than the new ones, so maybe the screen's lower on the newer ones.
I've got the 2010 27" iMac, 2.93 GHz processor. And yes, I was talking about the bottom of the display casing. :)
 

p3ntyne

macrumors 6502
Jan 10, 2014
406
3
Sydney, Australia
looks like the max is 2 x 256 and you have to choose the server version. I think its still the SATA version vs. the PCIe version of the imac.
.....

You can just buy the regular version and upgrade to two 1 TB SSD's. And, if you put them in RAID 0 they will be, while less reliable, faster than the PCI-e SSD's that come with the haswell models.
 
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