Can I extend airport network via ethernet with non Apple products?

Discussion in 'Mac OS X Server, Xserve, and Networking' started by appeLappe, Sep 19, 2018.

  1. appeLappe macrumors newbie

    appeLappe

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2003
    Location:
    Sweden
    #1
    Can I use my old time capsule as the hub, and extend the network with WiFi-devices that are not from Apple, connecting them with Ethernet cable?

    Is it easy? Anything to keep in mind?



    Long version: we will finally get high speed internet installed to our new house. There is a cabinet in the washroom with Ethernet connections to every room in the house. I was thinking of puting the time capsule in the cabinet, and a pair of other WiFi devices in the house. What should I get? I figured there should be a “bridge mode”, but will all devices recognise the Apple network?
     
  2. belvdr macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2005
    Location:
    No longer logging into MR
    #2
    I tried a couple of times to extend an AEBS with a Linksys router and couldn't get it to work reliably. I find Apple products work well only with Apple products (surprise!).
     
  3. techwarrior macrumors 65816

    techwarrior

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2009
    Location:
    Colorado
    #3
    I should not be a problem. As you stated, you already have Ethernet running throughout the house, be sure to use that to connect the satellite access points. Airports likely don't work well with wireless extending in a mixed vendor solution, but wired they should act pretty independent and rely on devices to sort it out. On the satellite APs, make sure they are in bridge mode.

    As for WiFi, your devices will tend to connect to the strongest signal. You have two choices on WiFi configuration, use the same authentication and network name, or use different credentials. Using the same is most seamless, be sure WPA\WPA2 settings, SSID and password match exactly or devices will suffer. Devices tend to cling to a network with weaker signals to avoid switching networks, but they may do so also if it is a mix of WiFi vendors equipment. So, experiment to find the best seamless solution.

    That said, generally same vendor solutions are more solid.
     
  4. appeLappe thread starter macrumors newbie

    appeLappe

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2003
    Location:
    Sweden
    #4
    Thank you for your thorough reply. I think I might have gotten some things wrong. I thought that the Apple device created the WiFi-network even if the WiFi was turned off on that device. I now realise that it doesn’t work that way. The time capsule will only be a router, and the other devices will be their own respective networks, although not with DHCP and other router features turned on.
     
  5. Altemose macrumors G3

    Altemose

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2013
    Location:
    Elkton, Maryland
    #5
    Yes. You can use the Time Capsule as either just a router/NAS or as a wireless AP. Then the other wireless APs must be configured with identical settings (network SSID, encryption, password, etc.) and set to bridge mode.

    Your Time Capsule may be configured to create a wireless network or simply provide routing functionality. The other devices will then use the existing IP address scheme and put everything on the same network, regardless of whether a device is connected to the Time Capsule or the other APs.
     
  6. techwarrior macrumors 65816

    techwarrior

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2009
    Location:
    Colorado
    #6
    FYI, WiFi access points do better when left out in the open. Every wall, door, floor the signals have to pass through deteriorates the signal a bit. If possible, love them out in the open, centrally located if possible.

    Start with minimum, just the router. Then, find dead spots and add access points there. Too many and you create collisions that slow things down. With WiFi, less is more.
     

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5 September 19, 2018