Can Macbook safetly use 7200RPM drives?

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by Wolfpup, Jun 14, 2007.

  1. Wolfpup macrumors 68030

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    #1
    Just out of curiosity, can the Macbook safely use 7200RPM drives? I tried searching, but couldn't find anything on this.
     
  2. siurpeeman macrumors 603

    siurpeeman

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    #3
    not only is it safe, you can do it yourself. good luck with the upgrade. :)
     
  3. iW00t macrumors 68040

    iW00t

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  4. nicolasmasset macrumors regular

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    #5
    Yeah it'll probably work, but I kinda think apple omitted from giving you that option when you build your mac because perhaps the macbook just isn't suitable for a 7200 drive, heat- and powerconsumptionwise.

    I've heard numerous people saying how hot the macbook can get, so my guess is that sticking in a 7200rpm drive would only make it hotter, thus making it more susceptible for damage, hence the reason why apple voids it warranty when you change the harddrive (for problems occurred by the drive of course).
     
  5. mad jew Moderator emeritus

    mad jew

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    #6
    Erm, I might be wrong, but replacing the MacBook hard drive doesn't void the warranty and 7200RPM drives are barely any hotter than their slower counterparts. Sorry to completely disagree with you, but yeah.... Umm... Sorry. :eek:
     
  6. iW00t macrumors 68040

    iW00t

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    #7
    Because of the lighter weight the Macbook will spin out of control causing injury to its user when the centrifugal forces of the high speed hard drive overcomes the gravitational forces acting on the entire computer. Due to its extreme light weight use of unauthorised parts are to be done at your own risk only!
     
  7. naraic macrumors member

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    #8
    Yes, i think you're right, unless maybe you buy a readdy cheap 7200rpm drive that's faulty and overdeats or something, other than that it should only be mildly hotter (I think). Also, the hard drive is definatyely user replaceable and therefore it shoudn't void the warrenty.

    On the other hand...does anybody know if the 7200rpm drives use much more power, affecting the battery life???

    Just brilliant....:D
     
  8. mad jew Moderator emeritus

    mad jew

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    #9

    Not really. Check out Tom's Hardware Guide's charts comparing different aspects of different notebook drives for more specific data on the matter. :)
     
  9. naraic macrumors member

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    #10
    About 0.3W difference between 7200rpm and 5400rpm...roughly, depending on what size drive you go for... That's about equal to what...? 5mins battery life? Not even that, I'd say...
     
  10. mad jew Moderator emeritus

    mad jew

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    #11
    Exactly. The differences in power usage and heat dissipation in real life are marginal, at the most. :cool:
     
  11. nicolasmasset macrumors regular

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    #12
    Putting any kind of third party hardware in your mac yourself (ram, harddrive) WILL void your warranty if they find that the problems you are having are due to the hardware you put in. I called my premium reseller with this question numerous times.

    For instance, if you put cheap ass ram in it and osx constantly crashes, and the people at applecare run some tests and see that the cause is the bad ram, you'll pay up for the reparations.

    I'm not a tech guy so I wouldn't know for sure about the hotness of the drive :D. It'll probably be battery life then?

    Come back and tell us what your verdict is when you've installed the 7200 drive! I'm interested in it myself, due to lots of audio work.
     
  12. siurpeeman macrumors 603

    siurpeeman

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    #13
    the act of upgrading (ram or hard drive) the macbook doesn't void the warranty at all. in fact, apple encourages it on their support site. they also put up pages detailing how to do it yourself. i don't see why apple would do this if it voided the warranty.

    and i don't think "reparations" is the right word. try "repairs."
     
  13. Igantius macrumors 65816

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    Apr 29, 2007
    #14
    As you say, why would Apple do that.. unless it's sneaky way of getting people to invalidate their warranty.


    There's a DIY repair section on the Apple Support pages detailing this (e.g. http://www.apple.com/support/macbook/diy/diy_faq.html) - in some cases, if you've a problem, where appropriate Apple would send you a new part to install.
    However, if a problem is caused by you installing it yourself (e.g. by supergluing the RAM in place), then that the warranty is voided.

    In any case, mad jew was responding to the incorrect assertion that replacing your MB hard drive yourself automatically voided the warranty.)
     
  14. nicolasmasset macrumors regular

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    #15
    I think the whole apple DIY stuff has to do with parts that you order through apple themselves. Apple would never encourage users putting in their own third party hardware if they weren't going to cash in on it. So I agree that the warranty won't be voided if you successfully put in a part that you bought either from apple.com or from an official retailer, but if you just picked up a 7200 drive at your local store and slammed it in there, my guess still is apple won't warrant that.

    So assume with me for a moment that the DIY pages on apple refer to hardware bought through apple, has anyone seen a 7200 drive for the macbook on either apple's site or at an official dealer?

    And I'll say reparations if I feel like it! ;)
     
  15. whateverandever macrumors 6502a

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    #16
    No, 7200rpm hard drives cause radiation in your laptop that can only be blocked by the metal case of the MacBook Pro :]
     
  16. CoachKrzyzewski macrumors member

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    Jun 13, 2007
    #17
    "centrifugal" force doesn't exist.

    you mean "centripetal" force ;)
     
  17. whateverandever macrumors 6502a

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    #18
    Should have known you'd troll this thread before me :p
     

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