Can Photoshop Elements Do This?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by MadDoc, Apr 6, 2008.

  1. MadDoc macrumors 6502

    MadDoc

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2005
    Location:
    UK
    #1
    Hi,

    I've just bought my first dSLR (a Nikon D60) and am thoroughly enjoying it.

    I am using Aperture as my photo management software but I have a question about image editing.

    Aperture 2.1 seems limited in it's editing capabilities (although greater than iPhoto obviously). I think I will need to invest in a separate image editing program to help foster my "creativity".

    I really like the effect this wedding photographer has achieved where the image is in black & white but a single child is in colour:

    http://www.markleightley.com/Guernsey_Wedding_Photographer.html

    Can this be acheived with Aperture alone? If not, will Photoshop Elements 6 for the Mac be capable of this or would I need the full version of Photoshop CS3 (which, to be honest, is far too expensive for a hobbyist like me).

    Thanks,

    MadDoc
     
  2. TuffLuffJimmy macrumors G3

    TuffLuffJimmy

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2007
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #2
    update aperture via the software update preference pane. and then use the dodge and burn tool, and then use the desaturate tool from there. Watch Apple.com/aperture/tutorials for a how to.
     
  3. numbersyx macrumors 65816

    numbersyx

    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2006
    #3
    Elements 6 will definitely do this for you - with a duplicate Adjustment Layer - Desaturate and then paint in black. Very easy.
     
  4. ChrisA macrumors G4

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2006
    Location:
    Redondo Beach, California
    #4
    In general Elements is a much more capable image editor. But the specific effect you asked about can be done in the latest verion of Aperure.

    But note the difference. In Aperure you have to hand paint the area to remain in color and in Elements you get to use selection tools to build a mask, you can refine the mask look at the result and "re-refinie" the mask. With adjustmant layers you can control the amount of saturation in both masked and un-masked areas. With Elements, by use of maskes and layers, all your work is reversable and non-destructive as long as you don't change the base layer. Aperure is a lot more primitive when it comes to editing
     
  5. Marky_Mark macrumors 6502a

    Marky_Mark

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2005
    Location:
    UK
    #5
    This is much easier in Photoshop Elements. I'll expand on what a previous poster said with some practical steps. Download a trial version of Photoshop Elements and give it a go - it's really easy:

    1. Open the photo you wish to edit. In the <del>left</del> RIGHT hand pallet, choose the black and white circle and create a hue/saturation adjustment layer.

    2. When asked, push the middle slider all the way to the left to make the saturation -100%, to create a monochrome layer over the top of the original picture.

    3. Select the brush tool and make the 'paint' colour black.

    4. If you then 'paint' over the area you want to remain coloured, this in effect erases the adjustment layer under your brushmarks, allowing the original photo to show through in all its coloured glory.

    Depending on the complexity of the coloured area, this will be less than a five minute job.

    Well worth £40 in my book. Who needs CS?
     
  6. bking1000 macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2007
    #6
    I've just gotten PSE, and am learning to use it. I tried an approach like this, but with a blur mask. I accidently brushed outside of where I wanted to, but didn't notice till much later, so I couldn't just undo. How do I correct that spot?
     
  7. thinkband macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2007
    #7
    Unless there is a secret method, you just need to go in the history box and go back to where you made your error. You could also try to cover it up, but I think just redoing the whole picture is in your best interest.
     
  8. ChrisA macrumors G4

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2006
    Location:
    Redondo Beach, California
    #8
    Any time you use a brush in Photoshop it is like using a brush on real paper. Good results require skill and a steady hand. So when peole offer advice to just "paint it in" Look to see who is opfferig the advice. Some of these pople are skilled graphic artists who can actualy draw freehand.

    Howerver some of us are un-coordinated kluzes what who have nearly zero hand-eye motor skils. For use Photoshop allows yu to build a mask using the selection tools. Use quick select, Laso tool and refine the selection using add and subtract eletion modes. using these tools as a book length subject and is in my opinion the key to masting photoshop. There so many tools for building masks that it would take hours to list them. Painting with a brush is only the simlest and fastest

    The good news is that a mask is just an editable grayscale image. You can paint and ease and filter it any way you like using the same tools that work fior normal non-mask images so even if yu can't "undo" you can paint white or black a required to modify the mask. Or as I said above use seletion tools to make a new mask.
     
  9. HomeingPigeon macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2007
    #9
    I did that with this picture.http://flickr.com/photos/kermeter/2382866116/

    You have to select what you dont want in black and white. Then you inverse the selection. Then you desaturate the rest of the picture. Then you can do whatever you want with the selected part.

    That is what I did. If you want me to I can take screen shots of doing it in elements for you if you want.
     
  10. MadDoc thread starter macrumors 6502

    MadDoc

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2005
    Location:
    UK
    #10
    Wow thanks for all the advice!

    I managed to get the effect I wanted using the Dodge & Burn tool in Aperture but it was a little fiddly.

    I will download the the trial and try that method and see what is easier (last time I looked there wasn't a trial so that's good news!).

    MadDoc,
     

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