Can Sierra be installed to a Xeon Server ?

Discussion in 'macOS Sierra (10.12)' started by soamz, Jun 20, 2017.

  1. soamz macrumors 6502a

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    #1
    hello, my dailylife is working with final cut pro and Im having a real hard time doing it on the macbook pro small screen.
    I was thinking to get a Xeon dual processor with 64GB RAM Intel server and connect a LG 5K monitor to it and install Apple OSX to it.

    Can it be done ?

    How much it costs to buy only OSX license ?

    Kindly share views and feedback.

    Im getting the intel server fully loaded for 2500 USD only.
    Its 2 processor E5 Xeons, so 16 core and 64GB RAM and 1TB SSD.
     
  2. chrfr macrumors 603

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    #2
    Is this some random server or a Mac? You can't just install macOS on any old hardware. There are some configurations that can be used to create what's known as a hackintosh, but you need to be sure you have supported hardware.
    In any case, the LG 5k display requires Thunderbolt 3 so your chances of being able to use that are pretty much zero.
     
  3. soamz thread starter macrumors 6502a

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  4. chrfr macrumors 603

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    #4
    You need Apple hardware.
     
  5. soamz thread starter macrumors 6502a

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    #5
    Oh bad :( then I guess it's better to just wait for imac pro. Hope they don't make it with some bad price tag
     
  6. treekram macrumors 65816

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    #6
    From the description of the hardware, you're describing a non-Apple computer. Apple doesn't sell OSX (now called macOS) but it's free and downloadable if you have a Mac. Putting macOS on a non-Apple computer is a violation of the licensing agreement, although there are many who have ignored that and installed it on non-Apple computers ("hackintosh"). The further the hardware from what Apple currently offers, the more difficult it is to install macOS on. The hardware you describe is different from what Apple currently has in the number of processors and the number of cores. If you have a good Linux or macOS system administration-like experience and have built dealt with bootloaders, drivers and the like, the hackintosh may be the route for you. Otherwise, you have 2 options - buy the most powerful Mac (iMac or Mac Pro, which should be updated within a year) or buy what you propose and run Windows or Linux and use different video editing software.

    I think the iMac Pro will be $5000 US when it comes out in December.
     
  7. soamz thread starter macrumors 6502a

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    #7
    iMac Pro with 18 cores and 128GB ram with 1TB SSD if 5000$, then it's good price. Better to wait for it and till then we'll just connect an external monitor to the Macbook Pro and use
     
  8. treekram macrumors 65816

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    #8
    https://www.apple.com/newsroom/2017/06/imac-pro-most-powerful-mac-arrives-december/

    I don't think the configuration you want will be $5000. If the base model doesn't come with a 1TB SSD, you should be able to get an external SSD for a reasonable price. The question is whether the RAM will be user-upgradeable or not, as it is for at least some iMac models. That won't be known until at least the formal introduction of the computer and may have to wait until somebody can do a tear-down of the computer. I also suspect that the base model won't come with 18 cores (every time they mention it, it says "up to 18" cores).
     
  9. soamz thread starter macrumors 6502a

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    #9
    I would be happy with 256Gb SSD + 64GB RAM + 12 cores for 5000$ also
     
  10. treekram macrumors 65816

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    #10
    My guess, only a guess on my part, is that the new base iMac Pro will have 512GB SSD, 32GB memory with 6 or 8 cores. Apple tends to be pretty consistent in their pricing model so if it follows the Mac Pro, an extra 32GB RAM will cost $800 and 4 extra cores will be $1200. I really doubt that the base will be more than 8 cores but maybe the base RAM could be 64GB. So the least I would expect for the configuration would be $6200, and up to about $7500. If the memory is user-upgradeable, it would be less, maybe half the price (32GB extra RAM would $400).
     
  11. chrfr macrumors 603

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    #11
    The price starts at $5000 US. That means for that price you'll get the 8 core version/32GB RAM/1TB SSD. You can likely expect the 18 core version with 128GB RAM will be closer to double that $5000 price.
     
  12. TheAppleFairy macrumors 68020

    TheAppleFairy

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    #12
  13. treekram, Jun 21, 2017
    Last edited: Jun 21, 2017

    treekram macrumors 65816

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    #13
    You're right. I didn't see the page where they listed the configurations.

    https://www.apple.com/imac-pro/specs/

    My guess wasn't that bad. So actually, one can get a good guess for what the price will be for 12 cores, 64GB RAM, 1TB SSD, based on how they price the Mac Pro - it would be $7000. If the RAM is user-upgradeable, possibly $400 less.

    I don't use Final Cut Pro but I do use Adobe Premiere Elements for non-professional use. I do more than cutting and pasting, but nowhere near what a professional would do. I think that for most video editing tasks, you're not going to notice the $3000 difference between what the iMac Pro will give vs. the new 4.2 Ghz quad-core iMac with 64GB RAM. The new iMac has a max base clock speed of 4.2 Ghz with turbo boost up to 4.5 Ghz, which is the same turbo boost as the iMac Pro (they don't mention the base frequency - it may be less and likely is reduced as the number of cores go up). Where the extra cores of the iMac Pro will help is in the rendering of the video. If you can find a way to offload the rendering of the video to another computer, then you may not need the extra cores on your primary editing computer.
     

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