Can someone explain what resting and active calories are?

Discussion in 'Apple Watch' started by Ghost31, Nov 2, 2018.

  1. Ghost31 macrumors 68020

    Ghost31

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2015
    #1
    Every time I see this lately I get confused. These numbers are definitely higher since watch os 5 whatever they are
     

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  2. Ntombi macrumors 68040

    Ntombi

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    Bostonian exiled in SoCal
    #2
    Resting is just what your body needs to run, even if you were lying prone 24/7. It is the energy needed to keep your heart beating, your brain working, food digesting, etc. It’s based on your age, weight, Muscle mass, metabolism, gender, and it’s also called your BMR, your basal metabolic rate.

    Active is everything beyond that. Work, exercise, sex, playing with your kids, whatever. That is all active caloric burn.
     
  3. Ghost31 thread starter macrumors 68020

    Ghost31

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    Jun 9, 2015
    #3
    I looked up a bmr calculator and this is what I found. Why are the numbers so different than what apple gives me? This says 1900. Apple says 2500
     

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  4. Ntombi macrumors 68040

    Ntombi

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    #4
    That’s a good question. I don’t know what info Apple uses. BMR is mostly a guesstimate, anyway, and some calculators trend higher than others.
     
  5. Julien macrumors G4

    Julien

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    Atlanta
    #5
    BMR (basil metabolic rate) is just life sustaining/maintaining at the current rate with NO activity or total rest. Apple takes BMR and adds "every day life" activates (taking a shower or typing at a computer) energy to get Resting Energy (why it's not called BMR). Active Energy is closer to exercise and all Exercise combined.
     
  6. niji Contributor

    niji

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    Location:
    tokyo
    #6
    the info from Julien is consistent with my own data in Health.

    but additionally, apple's BMR calculation for Resting Calories also takes into account how active you are (lately).

    what i mean by this is: apple's Resting Energy for you will be calculated at more calories per hour during an especially active week than during a week in which you haven't really been so active.

    what this is saying is (in layman's terms) that during periods of like a week or so, even at rest you are consuming more calories because your metabolism is running at a faster pace even when you are resting.
    that's why more accurate BMR calculators ask for info about how sedentary or active you are, not just your simple vital statistics.

    you can see this graphed out for you in Health/Activity/Resting Calories and look at the daily/weekly per hour resting calorie burn that will change depending on how active you were during that same period.
     
  7. Ghost31 thread starter macrumors 68020

    Ghost31

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2015
    #7
    Interesting. Is the way apple calculates calories different since watch os 5? Work days with no gym I would typically burn 2800 calories. Now after os5 without even trying I burn 3300. Is there some new thing being factored in here?
     
  8. niji Contributor

    niji

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2003
    Location:
    tokyo
    #8
    its not likely that apple's calculation method has changed.
    try looking for other factors based on yr activities, stats, etc.
     
  9. Ghost31 thread starter macrumors 68020

    Ghost31

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2015
    #9
    I could stay home and do nothing before and burn 2300 calories. Now it’s 2800. When my information hasn’t even changed. Something is definitely different
     
  10. bmat macrumors 6502

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    Nov 24, 2004
    Location:
    East Coast, USA
    #10
    My resting is closer to what the BMR calculations are for my weight, height, age. I don’t view it as anything too accurate though—I focus more on the active only to give me a view as to whether the day was active or slow.
     

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9 November 2, 2018