Can U use iphone for internet desktop?

Discussion in 'iPhone' started by alvinski, Apr 20, 2008.

  1. alvinski macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2008
    #1
    Does anyone know if you can connect to the internet on your desktop using the iphone for the connection?

    I'm moving my studio to a sailboat and looking for a cheap way to get an internet connection to my MacPro using a cell phone.
     
  2. Applejuiced macrumors Westmere

    Applejuiced

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2008
    Location:
    At the iPhone hacks section.
    #2
    The Iphone doesnt allow that service at the moment.
     
  3. mkrishnan Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2004
    Location:
    Grand Rapids, MI, USA
    #3
    It can be done with a jailbreaked iPhone (moderate complexity), but you should be aware that it violates your ToS with your service provider if you don't pay for a data services package that includes tethering.... So if you go that route, you at least in principle risk getting your account terminated or getting a large bill for overage charges or some other outcome like that.

    Here's an example walkthrough...

    http://cre.ations.net/blog/post/tether-your-iphone

    If you are paying for a proper data services plan, you might investigate getting a USB modem for your Mac Pro and a second SIM card from your service provider, since it will free up your iPhone.
     
  4. alvinski thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2008
    #4
    interesting...

    Hmmm... I noticed that cel companies are offering unlimited internet now... so the issue is with tethering to the desktop.

    I'm trying to get access via cell because here in the US I can get a cel signal up to 14 miles offshore and the satellite services cost a fortune.. for those rich guys in the mega yachts.

    Any other ideas on the best way to do this would be appreciated... I'm all ears.

    Also, does anyone know how to rig a MacPro to run an o 12v power supply... I'm adding a 96v electrical drive system, but no 110v or 220v
     
  5. Applejuiced macrumors Westmere

    Applejuiced

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    Apr 16, 2008
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    At the iPhone hacks section.
  6. mkrishnan Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2004
    Location:
    Grand Rapids, MI, USA
    #6
    Yes, but it isn't really just an artificial difference in pricing. The difference in pricing exists because the amount of data your Mac will transfer over the network is probably going to be a lot, by 1-2 orders of magnitude, more than your cell. Compare the data usage on your broadband to the data usage on your iPhone -- your iPhone is probably in tens or hundreds of megabytes per month; your broadband may be tens of gigabytes or more.

    The tethering services cost $30-60/month depending on the carriers and details... again, if you get one, you can typically get a USB modem that would connect to your Mac Pro and totally free it from depending on the phone at all....
     
  7. avaloncourt macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2007
    #7
    Yes, buy yourself a high quality, appropriately sized inverter. The specs say that a Mac Pro draws 12 Amps plus you'd have to add in the necessary power for the monitor and every other device you have attached. The computer alone will require 1440 Watts. You're going to want a true sine-wave inverter and guessing from the average setup you'll probably need a 3000 Watt (continuous run) model at least. Using a non-true sine wave model will be awfully hard on the computer and your monitor will look like crap.

    A couple questions, you're not going to be using it while underway, right? Are you going to be using it while you're on the water but anchored? If not, don't you have shorepower at your slip?

    Keep in mind that your on-board 12 volt is going to be rapidly depleted using a desktop computer, monitor, etc. That's one heck of a draw. One online inverter run-time calculator says you'll kill the battery in a half hour. You'll have to run the engine to keep it charged and that'll cost you the gas and sacrifice the peace and quiet. Think of how short run-times are on UPSes. You get a matter of minutes. You'll have more capacity with a marine battery but you can only deplete any battery to 50% before you do damage to the plates. The inverter will shut itself down before you get to a damage point.

    A 3000 Watt inverter at NewEgg is $400 and that's not even a true sine-wave model. A quick Google says that a sine-wave model will run you $1200 - $1500.
     
  8. alvinski thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2008
    #8
    Thanks for the info

    Great information... I'll be on shore power when at home base, but we shoot a lot of video and stills in remote locations... even for months at a time.

    The electric drive system runs on x8 gel deep cycle marine batteries and I have both solar and wind to slow charge... under sail the two electric motors also act as generators, but I won't be editing underway.

    There's also the generator, but the idea is to be as self sustaining as possible.

    Thanks for the advice
     
  9. avaloncourt macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2007
    #9
    It's a shame you can't scale down to a Mac Book Pro. That would be idea for your situation.

    I would assume with that setup that you have a battery charge/monitoring system. When not on shore power keep an eye on the monitor and if it has an alarm on it make sure it's active. That would be the best indication of the battery health. The Mac Pro is sure going to drag those batteries down quickly especially since you're editing and the processors will be going full out.
     
  10. leighonigar macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    May 5, 2007
    #10
    Agreed, a top end 17" MBP seems like one hell of a good idea.
     
  11. zap2 macrumors 604

    zap2

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    Mar 8, 2005
    Location:
    Washington D.C
    #11
    Yea, use working class folk can only scrap by with our normal yachts and Mac Pros :p

    But yes, battery+Mac Pro, isn't an ideal set up. Think about a MacBook Pro. It doesn't have all the spend the Mac Pro does, but hey, for mobile, it good. 4GBs of RAM, nice 7200RPM harddrive, you'll be golden :)
     
  12. wizard macrumors 68040

    Joined:
    May 29, 2003
    #12
    Funny I was going to suggest that myself. Especially if one can hold off for the next generation. Further I believe you can already find 12 VDC to Mac Book adapters.

    The biggest problem I see is the nature of his work. Video would be very demanding on any portable. The problem of course being storage.
    He will likely need a power source on line to supplement the battery. This could be solar panels or simply running an engine / generator.

    The fact remains that due to the application he will have a power drain that won't easily be improved upon I would not be surprised to find out he has a disk array or two to power. If this was a bog standard PC he would have other options. For example one can find 12 VDC and 48 VDC power supplies for ATX type computers on line. If one could be found for the Mac Pro that would be great as it would eliminate on or more power conversion steps and the associated losses.

    In any event on a small boat the big issue is that the vessel can take a beating. I have a hard time imagining long hard disk life at sea. Further interconnection are a bare and will be subject to corrosion. This means there will be a need to address the corrosion problem before the hardware ever leaves land.


    Dave
     
  13. avaloncourt macrumors 65816

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    Oct 18, 2007
    #13
    He made statements regarding this above.
     
  14. alvinski thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2008
    #14
    excellent.. love the advice

    Yeh, I used to work on a loaded powerbook because I went to so many locations, but I treated myself to the MacPro a year ago, with 512 card 8gigs ram and 3 terra disc array... I can't go back... noooooo

    I do a lot of Motion and all shooting/editing is in HD.. 30" monitor etc.

    The boat is a catamaran, lot's of room and ac/humidity control etc. so no real worries about crashing about and when sailing the equipment will be securely stowed.

    Just need a solid power supply... so eight gel marine batteries might last for 2 to 3 hours... then they can get charged by the wind and solar. Hey... that's not bad... I'll have to make a margarita or something while waiting for a charge... I can live with that :)
     
  15. 7on macrumors 601

    7on

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2003
    Location:
    Dress Rosa
    #15
    What about getting a Laptop card from AT&T and then get a router that converts those cards to LAN/WLAN?
     

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