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ganglu12

Suspended
Original poster
Jun 25, 2021
1
0
I live in rural area, where i got plenty of issues in finding signals for TV. Can anyone suggest me good antenna?
 

pmiles

macrumors 6502a
Dec 12, 2013
809
676
You're probably always going to have issues finding signals if you are truly in a rural area. Rule of thumb is to be within about 35 miles of the local broadcast towers... the further away you get, the less likely you will get a signal. Hence why cable became a thing.

Don't spend a mint on an antenna that promises you the world... too many factors reduce signals over the air for them to promise you anything other than emptying your wallet.
 

w5jck

Suspended
Nov 9, 2013
1,517
1,936
If you are in a rural area, then you really should get an external TV antenna, probably a directional one. I wouldn’t waste money on those cheap indoor antennas, which might be good in urban area, but wont work well, if at all, in a rural area. You need a good long range antenna like a Channel Master 100. They aren’t cheap, but I doubt you will receive much if you buy a cheap antenna.

 

Euroamerican

macrumors 6502
May 27, 2010
453
320
Boise

You need to find out what your distance to the sources are....

I agree about the frustration of cheap solutions.. A powered rooftop antenna is my next step, as even a bigger yagi recommended by a local expert installer did not bring in everything I want.
 

w5jck

Suspended
Nov 9, 2013
1,517
1,936
OP, you can use a website like Antennas Direct to locate the direction and distance to any TV transmission towers in your area. There are other websites too, you can do an internet search for them. Most of them want to sell you an antenna, so just ignore that and use the site to see how far away the towers are and what the estimated signal strength each should have at your address.

When installing the antenna, try to avoid pointing it through foliage or other obstacles as they can cause interference. The higher you can get the antenna, the better.

Hopefully all of the local TV transmission towers you want to receive from are located close enough to one another that a single antenna can receive them. If not, you can always put up two antennas pointed in different directions and co-phase them to receive in both of those directions.
 
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827538

Cancelled
Jul 3, 2013
2,322
2,833
First figure out what sort of signal your channels are broadcast on. If it's UHF (which I'm guessing it will be) then get a roof mounted UHF antenna with as high a gain as possible, something like a Channel Master Masterpiece 100 which has the highest UHF gain I know of (it will also do a good job with VHF which is becoming less common). Mount it as high as possible and pointed directed to the transmitter, you can attach a powered amplifier which may or may not help. If that doesn't work then the reality is you aren't going to be able to pick up the channels you want.

Also make sure you are using good spec coax, quad shielded RG6. There's better stuff than that if you're outside of North America though like WF100. Keep the coax runs as short as possible, splitters will divide the signal strength so try to avoid them.

If you want to get more into the weeds then hit me up and I can put my engineering EEE degree to use. VHF antennas are typically really wide, UHF antennas are typically fixed width but long. Most TV in the US is broadcast using UHF especially since the switchover to ATSC but some stations still use VHF. In places like the UK all TV is broadcast using UHF.

Antenna's direct have a really high gain UHF antenna.
 

OverTheHill

macrumors member
Jul 30, 2021
66
35
Here ya go. Not the prettiest, but it will work like a champ:




and this….

 

827538

Cancelled
Jul 3, 2013
2,322
2,833
Here ya go. Not the prettiest, but it will work like a champ:




and this….

Agree with Channels.

But for someone having issues getting a signal a directional yagi antenna is far more suitable. The one you suggested is more designed for receiving signals from different stations and will have lower gain than a good yagi antenna.
 

HobeSoundDarryl

macrumors G4
OP, many assumptions are being made for you here. You need to share more info for better advice. My suggestions are:
  1. Use AntennaWeb.org to see if you have a real chance to lock signals you desire.
  2. The higher your antenna, the better your chances. Rural mountain top almost certainly better than deep valley. Signals won't cut through mountains to get to you if you are in a valley.
  3. If you find you are too rural, there is no magic solution. Don't be suckered by promises of 100-150-250 mile antennas. Move closer to TV towers or go with streaming services or cable.
  4. Another thing that is going to influence an antenna recommendation is the results of that AntennaWeb.org scan: any desired channels located on VHF frequencies? If some of your are, that points to some different antenna than assumptions of UHF-only.
Based on your post, I read it like you can find weak signals... so there's hope. But AntennaWeb.org will clarify your actual potential and verify if you can use a UHF-only antenna or need VHF too. Then you need to break out a compass and consider location challenges (like valley vs. mountains) from where you are.
 
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