Can you pair a wireless bluetooth iHome speaker to a MacBook Pro?

a-m-k

macrumors 65816
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Sep 3, 2009
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I thought I could download the Enhance app from the App Store on my MBP, but it won't let me I have bluetooth turned on both my speaker and my MBP too. Did I forget to do something? If a website with directions could be provided, that would be very helpful in the long run.

Thank you in advance.
 

Clix Pix

macrumors demi-goddess
I looked at the ihomeaudio.com/EnhanceApp/ site and learned that the iHome Enhance app requires an iOS device with BLE functionality and supports the iBT84 color charging speaker. Also, I found this info:

Is it possible that your iPhone is not compatible with the specs (BLE functionality, whatever that is) or that the app is not going to be compatible with whichever iHome BT speaker you've got?

You shouldn't need the app to pair the BT speaker with your MBP.


    1. iHome Enhance App is compatible with the following models: iBT10, iBT175, iBT175 V2, iBT233 V1, iBT297, iBT751 iBT84, iBT85, iBT90, iBT91, IBTW39, & iWBT400.

      Please verify your model number is compatible. Our Support Team is available Monday - Friday at 1-800-288-2792.
  1. ★★★★★ ★★★★★ 1 out of 5 stars.
    · 20 days ago

    No enhance app for iBT233v2
    Called Customer Support and told there will not be an enhance app for the iBT233v2 - there is one for the v1. This makes no sense - I bought 2 for Christmas and now will have to return - darn! Otherwise quite fine.

[doublepost=1547744612][/doublepost]Just realized that it would be helpful to actually include instructions on pairing your speaker since that is actually the question you asked! I got distracted by the part about the app, which really is different than how to pair a BT item.

Directions are provided in this site. It's from 2014, though. However, the procedure should be much the same. The only issue might be that your computer is older and so has an older standard of BT than is currently in use by new BT gear, but it should be like USB and backwards-compatible anyway.

http://www.tomsguide.com/faq/id-2344556/pair-bluetooth-speaker-macbook-pro.html
 

a-m-k

macrumors 65816
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Sep 3, 2009
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Are you saying that the link you provided will work or be worth a shot to try to pair my speaker (it's actually the alarm clock with bluetooth if that makes any difference) and my phone?
 

Clix Pix

macrumors demi-goddess
I don't know any more than the information which I provided since I don't actually have an iHome device myself and since my current computer and iOS devices setup is undoubtedly different from yours, too. I just ran a couple of Google searches to find the information and links that I've provided here in the hopes that it might be helpful to you. The rest...well, it's up to you. Try the procedure for pairing the BT speaker and your computer, see what happens....
 

a-m-k

macrumors 65816
Original poster
Sep 3, 2009
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OK. I'll have to work with it, thank you for your help.
 

a-m-k

macrumors 65816
Original poster
Sep 3, 2009
1,113
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Hey, Clix Pix. Believe it or not, I just figured it out and it is connected to my MBP. As usual, I am not entirely sure what I did, all I know is that when I figured it out, I had my MBP on and I was in the room where my iHome bluetooth speaker was and to make sure I had it right I played a sample of some random song from the the iTunes store. Thanks for your help!
 

Clix Pix

macrumors demi-goddess
You're welcome and I'm glad it is working now. Yes, in order to pair two devices they have to be in the same room and within reasonable distance of each other for BlueTooth, just like with needing to be within a certain distance in order to pick up a WiFi connection.
 

a-m-k

macrumors 65816
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Sep 3, 2009
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I admit that the link you provided a little while ago was a bit confusing, but I guess since I was in the same room with my speaker it was easier. I have a tendency to figure out things on my own after carefully reading directions that are too "technical" for someone like me to understand. You might be familiar with me if you ever followed the "What's your ailment?" thread last year. I'm not trying to make you feel sorry for me. I actually take pride in the fact that, given peace and quiet, I can figure out a lot of things considering the "obsticals" I deal with daily. (I even just reached a big personal health milestone this past December.)
 

Clix Pix

macrumors demi-goddess
Actually, yes, I'm a little familiar with your situation -- I have a friend who has a shunt, has had it for a number of years and so far has never had to have a revision, surprisingly. As her doctor says, if you are functioning fine and are not experiencing typical symptoms of a failed shunt, there is no need to get in there. She considers herself very fortunate, needless to say.

I suspect many of us have to read technical instructions carefully more than a couple of times and even at that are still uncertain about how it's all going to go until we're actually in the process of doing whatever the task is. I know *I* do, anyway! Just taking a deep breath and plunging into it, doing the hands-on thing, usually works out for me. I do like to have the instructions right there, preferably written out step-by-step. It's interesting how often, though, something is left out or the process isn't quite the same as described in some way, and that's when one has to just trust that doing "x" "y" or "z" will get the job done anyway!
 

a-m-k

macrumors 65816
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Sep 3, 2009
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I've had a shunt all my life. I'm hoping since it's lasted this long I can keep it for the rest of my life. :)
 

a-m-k

macrumors 65816
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Sep 3, 2009
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I hope so, too! :). The fewer surgical interventions one has to have, the better, as far as I am concerned!!
Thank you, as of right now the spells I get are "peanuts" compared to a shunt malfunction or even a shunt blockage which is just as scary. (I had one back in the summer of 1999.)
 

a-m-k

macrumors 65816
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Sep 3, 2009
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Hang in there! :) Yes, a shunt malfunction or blockage would be very scary!
Especially if you've seen the bright white light and swear you've had an out of body experience. I don't know if my family believes me, but how can they disprove me, they aren't me.
 

a-m-k

macrumors 65816
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Sep 3, 2009
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Scarrier than going blind on and off because of a clogged shunt tube. It was the shorter tube that forks off the side near the top of the main tube.
 

Clix Pix

macrumors demi-goddess
Going blind on-and-off would be VERY scary!!! Since I am hearing-impaired, the idea of losing my vision for any reason is something which has always been a major concern. Yes, I can imagine that a tube would get clogged from time to time for various reasons, and that would be very disconcerting. Definitely one would need prompt medical attention in that situation!
 

a-m-k

macrumors 65816
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Sep 3, 2009
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Gee, I didn't know you were hearing impaired. Do you have Cloclier ear implants? (Forgive the spelling, I am phonetically spelling the name that I think they're called.)
 

Clix Pix

macrumors demi-goddess
I thought I had already mentioned this and described them in either a post or PM...... They are bone-anchored hearing aids (BAHA) and are different from cochlear implants in that I am not profoundly deaf and have patent (active) cochleas and auditory nerves. BAHAs are most commonly used for people who have conductive hearing loss for a variety of reasons. Some people have one BAHA due to having experienced single-sided hearing impairment due to acoustic neuroma, while other people use one or two BAHAS due to conductive hearing loss due to microtia/atresia.

Cochlear implants have an external part that sits behind the ear and another part that is surgically placed under the skin and is designed to stimulate the auditory nerve. The external sound processor behind the ear stays on the head due to a magnetic fastener.

Bone-anchored hearing aids are different in that they use a tiny screw which is implanted into the mastoid bone and extrudes slightly through the skin and then the sound processor is snapped onto it. Sound goes literally from the sound processor, conducted via the abutment (external screw) to the internal screw and through the bone. Most people hear through sound waves vibrating through the air, I hear through sound waves vibrating through the bone.

Prior to the BAHA I wore a standard bone-conduction hearing aid; I can attest that the sound quality of having two BAHAs is far superior!

By the way, I think we are getting way, way off-topic for this particular thread...... Although I suppose I could tie all this together by saying that when I get my next set of BAHAs they will come equipped with the technology for me to easily be able to use them as a sort of BT device with my computer, iPad and iPhone......that will be cool!
 

a-m-k

macrumors 65816
Original poster
Sep 3, 2009
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Hello Clix Pix!
As of right now I have the ability to have my MBP connect to my wireless speaker, however I can't get my phone connected now. That's OK if it can't be done. I have the one app that wasn't included on my iPhone on my MBP and since I have the ability to use my speaker wirelessly with my MBP, all is good. (Before we got this figured out, I drained my phone's battery every day. Now, I probably won't have to waste my battery life on playing games, texting, or listening to music.
 

Clix Pix

macrumors demi-goddess
I suspect that the problem is that one can have only one device paired with the speakers at a time.... At least this has been my experience with other BT devices, that while I could pair with one item, such as my Mac or my iPad or my iPhone, that the BT device could not be simultaneously paired with all of them. This is probably why you're not able to pair your phone with the speakers.

This is something that I'll be interested to see what happens when I do get around to getting my next set of BAHAS, whether I will be able to pair them only with the iPhone or only with the Mac, etc. This is what I"m thinking will happen, but it's not a big deal to unpair -- remove -- something like headphones or a set of speakers from a device and then re-pair with the other device that you want to use instead. That could be a big pain, though, in the case of speakers, which you'd probably prefer to just keep paired with your MBP!
 

a-m-k

macrumors 65816
Original poster
Sep 3, 2009
1,113
80
I suspect that the problem is that one can have only one device paired with the speakers at a time....
I thought so, too. Besides that, I have nice Sony brand ear buds small enough to fit comfortably. As for my speaker, it took a bit of trial and error to make it work this morning, but I had one setting wrong. I'm listening to it now. :)
 

Clix Pix

macrumors demi-goddess
Enjoy your music! I often listen to mine with BT bone conduction headphones that work really well for me. I am in a condominium apartment building so at night out of consideration for my neighbors I use the headphones when watching a video on the computer, too.
 

a-m-k

macrumors 65816
Original poster
Sep 3, 2009
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I'm glad to know you have your independence. I'm not sure if it would be necessarily safe for me because of my spells that come and go and the unpredictable shunt failure warning signs. (Which hasn't happened in over twenty-five years!) Thankfully, I have my family and friends who know when I am not having a good day and they help me out when I need it. I don't drive because of it.
 

Clix Pix

macrumors demi-goddess
Yes, that makes sense that you live with your family, as it would not be good for you to be on your own and have a seizure or some other shunt-related or neurological event. Your safety is paramount!

I was married for nearly twenty years until my husband died of cancer. That was a long time ago and I have been living alone ever since, first in our townhouse which I later sold and then in the condo apartment. Now I've been on my own so long I think I would find it difficult to live with someone else again!