Cannot Fix Or Delete Alias - File Doesn't Exist

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by DC Hurricane, Jul 23, 2012.

  1. DC Hurricane macrumors member

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2009
    #1
    I was trying to completely uninstall Google Chrome so I followed a tutorial I found on here which mentioned doing a search in Finder including system files and removing all of them. In the list of files there were 2 Preferences files that popped up. One was a real file in one of the chrome folders and another was an alias.

    This alias file has no indication that it actually exists. I have no idea if it ever pointed to anything. When I opened with Get Info it had no location and no permissions. I've tried to open it and it says "Fix Alias" and "Delete Alias" but deleting does nothing and pointing it at another file gives error code -43 which is a file not found error.

    I've searched all over and have no idea how to get rid of this file. Repairing permissions, rebooting, etc. but nothing has worked.

    My question is how do I get Finder to either delete this nonexistent file or get it to stop showing?
     
  2. Macman45 macrumors demi-god

    Macman45

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2011
    Location:
    Somewhere Back In The Long Ago
    #2
    It's a long shot, but try holding down the OPTION key when at the same time as you click delete. I doubt it will work but you've just about done everything else...I wouldn't worry about it though.
     
  3. DC Hurricane thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2009
    #3
    Tried holding down the option key and no luck. There has to be some sort of explanation for this. I know the files aren't taking up a grand amount of space, but this is driving me nuts.
     
  4. steviewhy, Jul 23, 2012
    Last edited: Jul 23, 2012

    steviewhy macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2011
    #4
    fire up Terminal and type:

    "sudo rm " without the quotes, and be sure to include the trailing space; then drag the alias on top of the terminal and hit enter.

    It will ask for your admin password. Enter it when prompted.

    Done

    if it still gives you trouble:

    "sudo rm -f " without the quotes, and be sure to include the trailing space; then drag the alias on top of the terminal and hit enter and enter you admin password when prompted.
     
  5. DC Hurricane thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2009
    #5
    The Terminal trick wouldn't work either because I couldn't drag the file or anything like that while in Finder. I was finally able to get rid of the files I believe. In Disk Utility I ran Verify Disk Permissions and saw a couple permissions had been damaged. Ran Repair Disk Permissions and it seems to have fixed the issue. I have no idea why it decided to work this time but I'm glad they're finally gone.
     

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