Canon 100mm f2.8 1:1 pics

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by shady825, Jun 13, 2009.

  1. shady825 macrumors 68000

    shady825

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    #1
    Hey guys, Im going to be picking up the Canon 100mm f2.8 this week sometime (whenever I get a free moment :rolleyes: ) I was just wondering if anyone can post some 1:1 macros.
    I guess I just want to know what to expect from this lens. I want to do some super close ups of bugs and am just curious if I will have to buy any extension tubes.

    So if anyone has any pics that are 1:1 on the lens only, I would really like to see them!
    Thanks in advance!
     
  2. John.B macrumors 601

    John.B

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    #2
    The "1:1" (or 1x or "lifesize") refers to the reproduction ratio. That means that, at your minimum focus length with that lens, you can focus on and shoot something roughly the same size as your sensor. If you think of a dime or a penny being approximately the same size as a crop or full frame sensor respectively, that's about the "biggest" macro image you'll be able to get in focus.

    Assuming you have a 50D, since that's what I have so I know the numbers off the top of my head, your sensor dimensions in pixels will be 4752 x 3168. Also assuming you are printing your uncropped picture at 300 dpi (not a bad assumption), that would natively print your dime on quality photo paper at 10"x15" without any additional interpolation (IOW, scaling up which might result in noticeable pixelation). At 200 dpi that would be just shy of 16"x24".

    A tripod and the tripod ring for that lens is a good investment. :cool:

    So, short answer, probably about a dime or penny filling the entire frame.

    If that's not enough magnification you'd either need bellows or the manual focus MP-E 65mm f/2.8 1x-5x (which would be my choice). And a good focusing rail between the lens mount and tripod. Plus a good bit of patience at that depth of field. ;)

    OBTW unless you have a secret source, the 100mm f/2.8 Macro can be tough to find in stock right now.
     
  3. FX120 macrumors 65816

    FX120

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    #3
  4. dllavaneras macrumors 68000

    dllavaneras

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    #4
    That really depends on the bugs you're going to photograph. For anything larger than half an inch, the 100mm macro is great. The working distance is about 6 inches (at 1:1), but the DOF is razor thin. Small apertures (f9-f13) are the ones I use. Of course, this means that you have to have good light, which is why I got a ring flash.

    There are a lot of pics on my site (link in my sig), and you can see some with and without the extension tubes. If you want to see something specific, or ask about the settings or how I took a particular pic, don't be afraid to ask :)
     
  5. CK. macrumors member

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    #6
    That, Palmer, is just aces. Brilliant. Magnificent. Wonderful. Astonishing!
     
  6. HBOC macrumors 68020

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    #7
    here is one i took last year. 30D/100mm macro combo.
    hand held
     

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  7. bertpalmer macrumors 6502

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    #8
    HBOC - lovely tones!

    It's not 1:1 though - unless that's a really small cat!
     
  8. HBOC macrumors 68020

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    #9
    I mis-read the thread title. I thought the OP wanted shots taken with the 100mm macro, as there are two variations of the 100mm that Canon makes. The soft focus f/2.0 and the macro f/2.8.
    Also to get 1:1, don't you need an adapter? Or is there a switch on the barrel of the lens, which i think that is the case...?
     
  9. John.B macrumors 601

    John.B

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    #10
    The EF 100mm f/2.8 macro (and the EF-S 60mm f/2.8 macro) will go down to 1:1.

    The switch on the 100mm just allows you to limit the focusing range (in addition to the AF/MF switch, of course).

    It's the 50mm f/2.5 macro that only does 1:2 and needs a custom "lifesize converter" to go down to 1:1 -- at which point you might just as well consider the 100mm or 60mm (though I found I had to get too close to the subject to get 1:1 with the 60mm).
     
  10. AlaskaMoose macrumors 65816

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    #11
    The switch (more like a button) on the barrel saves time to the autofocus system. But if the lens AF/M is switched to M (manual), then the Focus Distance Switch's position makes not difference, since one focuses the lens manually.

    Lens set to AF (autofocus): lets say that you are taking photos of a subject that is moving around, but at a range of 20 feet to 100 feet. Since the subject is moving, you may want to set the camera to AI Servo and burst mode. In this case, you can switch the focusing distance switch to"0.48m/1.6 feet to infinity," since the subject won't be close to you. By doing so, the camera and lens save time keeping the subject in focus by not having to move the focusing mechanism all the way close to you and then back out.

    Lets say that you are shooting a subject that's moving, but right close to the camera. In this case, the autofocusing system saves time focusing when the Focus Distance Switch is set to "0.31 m/1.0 ft. to infinity," since the system does not have to "hunt" back and forth all its length. It just has to focus within a close distance.

    However, the Focus Distance Switch can be left alone in any position you want. Just keep in mind that sometimes a fraction of a second of focusing time could make a difference.

    Some details about the EF 100mm f/2.8 Macro USM
    -Construction: 8 groups, 12 elements
    -Maximum aperture: f/32
    -Minimum focus distance: 0.31 m/1.0 feet
    -Maximum magnification: 1 x
    -Filter diameter: 58mm
    (for getting closer than one foot, use extension tubes).
     
  11. qpawn macrumors member

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    #12
    Flower Buddy
    Canon 30D, ISO 400, 1/250, f8, 100mm
    [​IMG]

    My Crop:
    [​IMG]

    100% Crop:
    [​IMG]

    The Fly
    Canon 30D, ISO 400, 1/200, f11, 100mm
    [​IMG]

    100% Crop:
    [​IMG]

    Note: I use a highly advanced custom flash setup where I bounce the built-in flash off some aluminum foil which then bounces the light off of a paper plate stuck in the top of the camera... highly advanced. :p
     
  12. JoshJosh117, Jun 14, 2009
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2016
  13. qpawn macrumors member

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    #14
    I would say yes. It takes great macro shots and even makes for a good portrait lens. Well worth the $500 I spent for it. :)
     
  14. dllavaneras macrumors 68000

    dllavaneras

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    #15
    Here is the resized original file, and a 100% crop of the head of the dragonfly at 1:1. This lens is really sharp, although the DOF at 1:1 is very small.
     

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  15. John.B macrumors 601

    John.B

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    #16
    To the OP, remember that minimum focus distance is the measurement from your subject to the focal plane (i.e. back to the sensor inside the camera body); to get 1:1 with the 100mm you'll need to have the end of the lens at about a 6" working distance from your subject.
     
  16. shady825 thread starter macrumors 68000

    shady825

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    #17
    This is awesome! Exactly what I was looking for!
    Now this is lens only? No extension tubes?
     
  17. dllavaneras macrumors 68000

    dllavaneras

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    #18
    Lens only, no extension tubes, at 15 cm from the head of the dragonfly to the front element of the lens.

    Keep in mind that I used a ring flash for this shot.
     
  18. HBOC macrumors 68020

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    #19
    great shots. The bokeh on this lens is beautiful!
     
  19. Stratification macrumors regular

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    #20
    It really is, just absolutely buttery smooth. I don't have a 100% crop on this one, but here's one I put up on my Virb account recently:

    [​IMG]

    I'd only had the lens a couple of days and was absolutely blown away by this one.
     
  20. HBOC macrumors 68020

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    #21
    yeah! I just can only imagine what the CR2 file looks like!!
     
  21. shady825 thread starter macrumors 68000

    shady825

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    #22

    I ordered the lens today!! :) I can't wait for it to get here!!
    I think I'll be investing in a ring flash in the near future. For the time being I'm sure I'll make something that looks pretty ghetto but does the trick! Haha
    thanks.

    (from the iPhone)
     
  22. Abstract macrumors Penryn

    Abstract

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    #23
    I hope that people who look at this thread don't think that they're going to get results like dllavaneras's dragonfly all the time. I have a Nikon 105 mm f/2.8 VR lens, and my lens must be broken, because I have NEVER had results like that. :D :p

    It's a great photo, dllavaneras. :)


    However, the macro ability my lens sometimes makes it really useful for other types of photos. Here's one from last weekend. No cropping whatsoever. It's not quite 1:1, but I was so close to her that other lenses wouldn't have been able to focus at all.

    I have another shot of this lady (from Cirque du Soleil) from around 1:2, but the DoF was so small that her eyelashes were in focus, but her eyeball (iris) was not. She had her eyes open at the time, but there's nothing I can do to fix that eye in Photoshop. :eek: If there is, I'm certainly not good enough to do it.
     

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  23. dllavaneras macrumors 68000

    dllavaneras

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    #24
    The ring flash has helped me a great deal due to its many functions, but it's not an absolute-must, can't-get-good-shots-without-it kind of accessory. On a class trip I had to leave my ring flash behind (due to space issues) and had to use the built-in flash, and I got great results. Sure, the lighting is a bit harsh, but perfectly OK in my opinion:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    (click here for a 100% crop of the previous pic. That's an untouched crop, no sharpening or anything)

    As you can see, the lighting is a bit harsh, but I can live with it ;)

    Wow, thanks! :) I'm glad you like it!

    It's tru, you won't get results like that all the time, but with a bit of practice, you'll see your "keepers" count climb. Just keep in mind that with macro, 10 good shots out of 200 is a good ratio. When I go shooting, I usually take between 200 and 300 pics, process about 50 and decide to post/print 5-6 (a dozen on a great day).

    The most important thing is practice, practice, practice!
     
  24. Abstract macrumors Penryn

    Abstract

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    #25
    Here's a question: How do you get so close to these insects? Do you wait for them to come to you, or do you slowly inch towards them? :confused:


    Also, when I try to take macro shots, I find that f/16 or smaller is necessary to get a decent amount in focus from up close. Sure, if I'm taking a 1:2.5 macro, perhaps I can use a larger aperture. However, it seems like you can get closer to the insects than I can, AND you can use a larger aperture. The world is not fair, or perhaps I'm just doing something wrong. :confused:
     

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