Canon 7D

Discussion in 'Digital Video' started by Tsuchiya, Oct 10, 2011.

  1. Tsuchiya macrumors 68020

    Tsuchiya

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2008
    #1
    Hi just wondering if anyone uses a Canon 7D to shoot HD footage? I'm looking for something that can produce quality 1080p clips for an upcoming project, that does well in low lighting etc.

    I'm by no means a professional, just a bit of a hobbyist with a fair amount of time on his hands :D

    What do you guys think? Overkill? Any other recommendations? I'll be mainly be using this for shooting video, experimentation etc, so perhaps a SLR isn't what I should be looking into. However, I've always wanted a SLR and dislike having to borrow my brothers 450D all the time so was thinking that the 7D is a good all-round choice.
     
  2. CaptainChunk macrumors 68020

    CaptainChunk

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2008
    Location:
    Phoenix, AZ
    #2
    I've worked on several projects shot on the 7D. It's a great camera for video once you understand and learn to work around its limitations (rolling shutter/"jello", moire patterns on highly-detailed subjects/objects, etc.).


    Also consider the 60D if your primary use would be video. Practically all of the 7D's advantages over the 60D pertain only matter to still photographers (more AF points, faster image processing, etc.). The 60D uses the same CMOS sensor and is a few hundred dollars cheaper.
     
  3. nateo200 macrumors 68030

    nateo200

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    Feb 4, 2009
    Location:
    Northern District NY
  4. handsome pete macrumors 68000

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    Aug 15, 2008
    #4
    I agree with everything CaptainChunk said.

    I have a 7D and love the results I've gotten with it. However you really need to understand the limitations going in. It's nowhere near the same ballpark as what you get with a dedicated video camera.

    The 60D and t3i shoot the same video as the 7D, so you might want to go that route and use your savings on lenses. The 7D does have advantages for still shooting and I prefer the build quality of the 7D. But that might not be as important to you.
     
  5. LethalWolfe macrumors G3

    LethalWolfe

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2002
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    #5
    The 60D also has a flip-out LCD screen which can be more ergonomically friendly when shooing video.


    Lethal
     
  6. Tsuchiya thread starter macrumors 68020

    Tsuchiya

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2008
    #6
    Thanks for the replies guys, I'm definitely going to try and get some proper hands-on time with one of these cameras and see how I get on with it.

    I'll have a look at the 60D as well, I didn't realise it shot the same video as the 7D.

    Vimeo is awesome, and that link about the House episode was a really great read. It was actually the Season 6 finale that got me thinking about using a Canon DSLR to shoot film. I read somewhere (incorrectly) that the 7D was used to shoot so I looked into it. Even after finding out that the 5D was used instead I read some good things about the 7D in the process.
     
  7. nateo200, Oct 10, 2011
    Last edited: Oct 10, 2011

    nateo200 macrumors 68030

    nateo200

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2009
    Location:
    Northern District NY
    #7
    Yeah the ONLY reason the 7D wasn't used was the lack of 35mm sensor...but to be honest you can still do some AMAZING things with the 7D's sensor; which applies absolutely no less to Canon's 60D, 600D, and 550D with video as the sensor is "the same". Only differences are when you start looking at the extreme's of the ISO settings, for example the 7D will always be less grainy at ISO 6400 than the 550D at 6400 but its not that noticeable and anyone in their right mind isn't going to shoot video at 6400 unless they are out of options...About the interview though; It was really inspiring and just awesome to hear a director of a prime time TV show going on and on about tools I have access to! I don't have to worry about renting ub3r expensive equipment when I have a DSLR body! I just need to focus on the less expensive aspects which is what I feel has sparked the DSLR short film revolution.

    The limitations are annoying at times with the video I won't lie but you can get over them and for the most part the DSLR kills dedicated camcorders in the same price range (not talking RED one here) when its comes to depth of view...just keep in mind that shooting little frankies baseball game with a 7D is not going to be as easy or fun as it would with a Sony Camcorder...focusing is all manual don't even think about autofocus...I tried it once and pretty much killed allot of footage..thank God I reverted back half way through. Audio quality isn't terrible but dialog will sound "tinny" and bad in rooms subject to echo or if your trying to do a serious film. Finally back to focus...fast moving targets are a major challenge with pulling focus manually on a DSLR...the 7D touts some pretty bad ass focus features but that applies almost exclusively to autofocus in stills so that is moot.

    SO I think you should seriously look at the 60D. My friend has a 60D and I have the 550D and we compare all the time; his camera is better for the actual shooting of video and has audio monitor (which the 550D and even the 7D doesn't) but in the end our videos all have that same 1080p24 glory to them. The 60D is sort of an awkward medium in the Canon EOS line but video type guys who know they will be doing video will appreciate it allot.

    This guy says it all for me^^^! Very true! When looking at a DSLR soley for stills its easier to say bigger price=better stuff but when you start looking at video that's not always true...
     
  8. CaptainChunk macrumors 68020

    CaptainChunk

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2008
    Location:
    Phoenix, AZ
    #8
    But also remember that while those results are quite achievable, the DPs behind those cameras (and the post work) were responsible for 90% of making that episode look so good.

    And Phillip Bloom is a very talented DP/operator. He can make practically anything look good.
     
  9. nateo200 macrumors 68030

    nateo200

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2009
    Location:
    Northern District NY
    #9
    Very true. I got my DSLR and just went out and started shooting...I thought everything was going fine until post edit when I realized I left my ISO on auto, wasn't in focus good, etc. Second significant video! I learned allot and started using ISO's with more brains and focused on pulling focus best I could and even used some dedicated audio for more sound effects...posted the video on my Vimeo and YouTube and everyone loved it but my friend with the 60D made a comment about appeture needing to be raised and then I realized I shot the whole thing on 3.5 or 5.6 resulting in the main focus of the video (moving person) getting a mild but just significant enough blur to bother me when the target was moving towards and away from the camera...

    SO my point is learn the basics and practice them and then in post edit (I used FCP X) slave over the monitor (actually monitors because despite the cool factor multiple monitors make things run soooo much quicker) until it looks perfect, not "good enough" but perfect. So color correct, crop, cut that 0.25 seconds of crap in a shot that makes it look like you have no budget and make it good because little things can kill the feel of a video. Go on Vimeo and read up a bit or head over to the many places Philip Bloom plops himself on...he unlike many seams to be a fan of revealing "the secrets" at least the surface which is nice...
     
  10. madaspy macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2011
    #10
    I own the 7d and shoot professionally. This is a link to my personal video http://www.vimeo.com/26043394 but I use it at work to shoot video professionally as well, and all of my co workers own the 60d with the flip out screen, and 9 times out of 10 I'd rather shoot video on the 60d because of that flip out screen. It really really makes a large difference when trying to shoot "unique" angles. Honestly, I've yet to see any noticeable difference between the t3i 60d and 7d as far as quality of video is concerned.

    BTW in the video i posted earlier all the steadicam stuff is 60d and the rest is 7d!

    Also, I know people say go out and spend money on lens, and while that is true you should have some good quality lenses, but if you're not making any money from your camera, the kit lens and the canon 50mm 1.8 II which is a $100 lens is all i'd recommend starting with. I wont lie, those are the only two lens I own. :D
     

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