Canon Refurbished Questions!

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by mattbaar26, Jul 21, 2014.

  1. mattbaar26 macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2013
    #1
    Hey all, not sure if this is the approriate forum or not but I figured I'd give it a shot. I'm taking a digitial photography class next semester and want to get a decent camera. Canon has an additional 25-30% off their refurbished prices and I was just wondering if I should jump on any of these.

    I'd be doing really amateur work, nothing really action or things like that, possibly buy a dive housing sometime in the future but would likely have a new camera by then anyways. I am pretty set on wanting a Canon, I have a few friends with them and they seem to be easier to use than Nikons.

    http://shop.usa.canon.com/shop/en/c...OS-_-140718613-_-BFinJuly002&WT.mc_id=C126149

    That's the link for reference.

    Any advice at all would be great!
     
  2. Apple fanboy macrumors Core

    Apple fanboy

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2012
    Location:
    Behind the Lens, UK
    #2
    Any DSLR will do what you need. Think about what you want to shoot (maybe check the course syllabus). The lens or lenses you choose are more important than the body.
     
  3. MCAsan macrumors 601

    MCAsan

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2012
    Location:
    Atlanta
    #3

    What are the limits regarding the class syllabus (what kind of camera is required/recommended). Can you use a smartphone, or tablet, a point and shoot (with or without raw file capabilities), a 35mm crop DSLR, a full frame 35mm DSLR, a mirror less 35, or a mirror less Micro Four Thirds? As you can tell there is a world of very different cameras that can all capture quality images. What are your budget limitations for a camera and at least one lens?

    You can indeed purchase refurbed cameras and lenses from Canon. The wife and I had two 50 pounds bags of 7Ds, 5DIIs, and L lenses. Most of those can from the refurb store. BTW, did you know if you trade an old Canon body, you can get extra hundreds off? You have to call that order in as the web site does not mention any Canon Loyalty Program.

    If a 35mm is not required, look at getting a top of the line Point and shoot with a large zoom range and the ability to do raw files. You can get one for around $400-500 and not have any extra costs for lenses. Again much depends on the syllabus and budget requirements.
     
  4. ChrisA, Jul 21, 2014
    Last edited: Jul 21, 2014

    ChrisA macrumors G4

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2006
    Location:
    Redondo Beach, California
    #4

    You say "nothing" and then talk about "dive housing". Underwater photography is about the most difficult and technical kind of work you can think of. Almost certainly you are working with manual mode and off camera manual mode flash in a mixed lighting environment. Learn to think in f-stops and lighting ratios and guide numbers.

    Don't try it until you have "perfect buoyancy". I don't know maybe you have 1,000 dives and are in the water five days a week. Or you might be a total beginner "vacation diver". But taking an SLR under water is a big learning curve. start with an automated point and shoot using available light, no flash. Even if you get the SLR, yu wan the tiny camera too. Only other UW photographers like to dive with UW photographers, goes triple if you have an SLR.

    Also have you priced SLR housings? They cost more than the camera but maybe double. Get a little point and shoot UW camera and move up slowly (no pun) The worse part is a housing works with only ONE make and model camera. So you buy a Canon 60D and get a housing. If ever you change the body you will have to buy a new housing. The housing cost more than the body. So people shop for a housing and then buy a body and a spare body (in case the housing leaks) You may not even want a fancy body because the housing might not even allow use of some features. Not all the controls are brought out. Typically you use a very wide fixed lens so fast autofocus hardly matters as in the wear everything from 24 inches to infinity will be in focus. The water effects the camera like it does you mask unless you have a dome lens on the housing.

    Get a point and shoot for diving until after after you've learned a bit about UW photography.

    BACK to your class: Talk to the instructor. likely any camera with manual controls will be acceptable. Almost all camera have this.

    FINALLY: You best plan would be to wait until AFTER the class to buy the camera because then you will know a lot more than you do now. After shooting 1,000 frames you will be past the beginner stage.

    The "Classic" photo student camera has always been a basic SLR with a 50mm prime lens. Hard to beat that. Buy a used one if you must. In fact used is always a better deal. A used Canon Rebel costs about $175 then sell it for $150 after the class. Figure you are buying your FIRST camera not the last one. Flip it in 6 months.
     
  5. mattbaar26 thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2013
    #5
    Thanks for the advice guys, I think I will wait to make a big purchase until after the class when I know more about photography.
     
  6. E3BK macrumors 68020

    E3BK

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2008
    Location:
    NYC
    #6
    Most beginner digital photography classes that aren't specifically "mobile photography" will want you to have a camera with manual controls. Be it full frame, crop, micro 4/3..that usually doesn't matter as you'll be covering basics like aperture, shutter speed, light metering, etc.

    When you signed up, it should have specified what kind of eq is recommended. The price for the SL1 and T3i looks pretty good. As a beginner, you don't need the top of the line bells & whistles. Either of those would be fine. Has enough features for you to learn and manuals controls. Once you start to feel comfortable with manual controls and how to "shoot" then you can consider an upgrade. I had my xTi for years before I finally upgraded to a 7D and it still works, actually. You'll want some lenses too but just start with a kit lens & 50mm prime. Those lenses, if you stay in the Canon family, should fit future upgrades of the body.

    I should also say that if you decide to buy a refurb, direct from Canon is always the way to go. My 7D was refurbished and works great, saved me $ and came with full manufacturer warranty.

    Hope that helps.
     
  7. paolo- macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2008
    #7
    Good idea. :p (I had written a longer post but it was basically just a re-hash of ChrisA's, so I agree with him.)
     

Share This Page