Canon Releases Five New AirPrint-Enabled Printers

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Canon has announced a series of five new MAXIFY inkjet printers with AirPrint support, including the MB5420, MB5120, MB2720, MB2120, and iB4120 models.


AirPrint enables wireless printing from iPhone, iPad, iPod touch, and Mac without having to install additional software or drivers. The technology is supported by dozens of printers sold by Brother, Canon, Dell, Epson, HP, Lenovo, Lexmark, Panasonic, Ricoh, Samsung, Toshiba, Xerox, and other manufacturers.

Canon's MAXIFY lineup of all-in-one printers are designed for home or small office use, with built-in copying, scanning, and faxing capabilities alongside cloud-connected features through the free Canon PRINT app. The all-new printers retail for between $149.99 and $399.99 on Canon's website based on U.S. pricing.

Article Link: Canon Releases Five New AirPrint-Enabled Printers
 

ArtOfWarfare

macrumors G3
Nov 26, 2007
8,855
4,645
Printers go into the same category as VCRs and landlines in my mind...
People still own those?

You have to pay $100+ upfront for the printer, and then you have to go back to the store and pay for paper and ink from time to time.

It's incredibly rare that you actually need to do anything with a printer anymore. I receive PDFs by email, fill them out in Preview or on my iPhone (the default mail app has nifty features for filling out PDFs), send them back. If I have to fax it instead, there are cheap online services that you can upload PDFs to have them faxed on your behalf. If you must have stuff printed for some reason, just use the printer at work or staples or the library or whatever - you were going to need to go out to buy ink and paper anyways.

They just make no sense. I stopped having a printer 4 years ago.
 

jacjustjac

macrumors regular
Feb 12, 2008
219
323
New York, NY
This seems like a newsworthy article in 2011. But now it would be more notable if they *didn't* include AirPrint.
Nowadays I just use the printer at work, and even then, I prefer the B&W laserjet because it prints so fast and I only ever print forms I need to mail or fax. Owning an inkjet for the occasional plane-ticket (I'm looking at you Spirit) or photo seems like a waste of ink and space. But I can't argue with the convenience of being able to read a 30-page report outside in the sunlight, at least until Amazon makes another 10" Kindle.
 
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69Mustang

macrumors 604
Jan 7, 2014
7,462
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In between a rock and a hard place
Printers go into the same category as VCRs and landlines in my mind...
People still own those?

You have to pay $100+ upfront for the printer, and then you have to go back to the store and pay for paper and ink from time to time.

It's incredibly rare that you actually need to do anything with a printer anymore. I receive PDFs by email, fill them out in Preview or on my iPhone (the default mail app has nifty features for filling out PDFs), send them back. If I have to fax it instead, there are cheap online services that you can upload PDFs to have them faxed on your behalf. If you must have stuff printed for some reason, just use the printer at work or staples or the library or whatever - you were going to need to go out to buy ink and paper anyways.

They just make no sense. I stopped having a printer 4 years ago.
You're right when it comes to consumers. Definitely wrong when it comes to businesses. Paper, ink, and toner are still the top consumables. My company does some backend work for Staples and Office Depot. Their numbers are interesting. Both hate selling those 3 items because there's no real money in it. Printers are so cheap that they're almost considered a throw away product. Apparently, the paperless office is a unicorn in the business world as a whole. Their research has shown people still overwhelmingly desire the tactile feel of paper.
 

azentropy

macrumors 68020
Jul 19, 2002
2,456
1,659
Surprise
Look like nice printers, but I'm done with inkjet printers. Like most people I don't print as much as I used to and I found that every time I wanted to print the inkjet cartridges were dried out. Printing was getting very expensive. So switched to color laser and don't have that problem any longer. The Dell E525w goes on sale for $120 and is a color printer, scanner, copier, fax, supports AirPrint that I've been pretty impressed with the short time I've had it.
 

2457282

Suspended
Dec 6, 2012
3,327
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Printers go into the same category as VCRs and landlines in my mind...
People still own those?

You have to pay $100+ upfront for the printer, and then you have to go back to the store and pay for paper and ink from time to time.

It's incredibly rare that you actually need to do anything with a printer anymore. I receive PDFs by email, fill them out in Preview or on my iPhone (the default mail app has nifty features for filling out PDFs), send them back. If I have to fax it instead, there are cheap online services that you can upload PDFs to have them faxed on your behalf. If you must have stuff printed for some reason, just use the printer at work or staples or the library or whatever - you were going to need to go out to buy ink and paper anyways.

They just make no sense. I stopped having a printer 4 years ago.
Mostly Agree. I have a printer at home that I purchased in 2011 or 2012 when I bought my last iMac. Don't expect to replace either one. The world has indeed moved on. The only reason I kkep the printer is mostly for my wife as she is still working on her thesis and likes to print stuff she thinks will be useful later.
 

NT1440

macrumors G5
May 18, 2008
12,366
15,535
Every HP wifi printer has supported Airplay since 2010....and those are crap printers. WTF is taking so long canon?
 

ipedro

macrumors 603
Nov 30, 2004
5,347
6,320
Toronto, ON
You're right when it comes to consumers. Definitely wrong when it comes to businesses. Paper, ink, and toner are still the top consumables. My company does some backend work for Staples and Office Depot. Their numbers are interesting. Both hate selling those 3 items because there's no real money in it. Printers are so cheap that they're almost considered a throw away product. Apparently, the paperless office is a unicorn in the business world as a whole. Their research has shown people still overwhelmingly desire the tactile feel of paper.
Just wait until the generation who grew up on iPhones and iPads enters the workforce. A paperless office already exists in several industries. Preferring "the tactile feeling of paper" is something for older generations. Newer generations never knew that feeling and don't really care for it. Soon, it'll be just as quaint as mailing a letter to clients as a part of business where email has largely replaced written communication.
 

69Mustang

macrumors 604
Jan 7, 2014
7,462
14,032
In between a rock and a hard place
Just wait until the generation who grew up on iPhones and iPads enters the workforce. A paperless office already exists in several industries. Preferring "the tactile feeling of paper" is something for older generations. Newer generations never knew that feeling and don't really care for it. Soon, it'll be just as quaint as mailing a letter to clients as a part of business where email has largely replaced written communication.
There are a lot of assumptions in your post. Not sure all of them survive scrutiny. I can agree on the premise that kids used to the touch input of phones and tablets are much more likely to eschew a papered workplace. Eventually we'll get there. Just not as fast as some people think. Heck, even my generation (X) was supposed to go paperless. Paperless industries? Businesses, yeah. Industries? Perhaps you're using industries as a synonym for businesses.
Not sure which newer generations you're referencing, but every current generation knows the tactile feeling of paper. Kids still read paper books, do homework, and other things. As for later generations not caring for it, neither you nor I can even come close to a factual statement on that. Things are changing, there's no doubt about it. Just not as fast as some futurist would have you believe.
 

ArtOfWarfare

macrumors G3
Nov 26, 2007
8,855
4,645
Not sure which newer generations you're referencing, but every current generation knows the tactile feeling of paper. Kids still read paper books, do homework, and other things. As for later generations not caring for it, neither you nor I can even come close to a factual statement on that. Things are changing, there's no doubt about it. Just not as fast as some futurist would have you believe.
I was born in 1992. The last year I touched a physical book would have been in my sophomore year of highschool... in 2009 or 2010. Only used ebooks through the later half of highschool and then college. I did handle non-book paper after that... I had to do a bound report in college one time... but I printed that off from the print center at school.

I think if you're born after ~2006 or so, maybe you'll never end up touching a physical book? IDK. Don't have any family members who are old enough to have started school but young enough to have been born after 2006 to ask, and I'm not going to seek out strangers to ask.
 

69Mustang

macrumors 604
Jan 7, 2014
7,462
14,032
In between a rock and a hard place
I was born in 1992. The last year I touched a physical book would have been in my sophomore year of highschool... in 2009 or 2010. Only used ebooks through the later half of highschool and then college. I did handle non-book paper after that... I had to do a bound report in college one time... but I printed that off from the print center at school.

I think if you're born after ~2006 or so, maybe you'll never end up touching a physical book? IDK. Don't have any family members who are old enough to have started school but young enough to have been born after 2006 to ask, and I'm not going to seek out strangers to ask.
My youngest was born in 2005 and my oldest was born in 2000. I assure you, they both still use physical books along with e-devices. Maybe other parents can chime in, but most K-12 students experience a combination of physical and electronic learning tools.
 

nutmac

macrumors 601
Mar 30, 2004
4,717
3,157
Look like nice printers, but I'm done with inkjet printers. Like most people I don't print as much as I used to and I found that every time I wanted to print the inkjet cartridges were dried out. Printing was getting very expensive. So switched to color laser and don't have that problem any longer. The Dell E525w goes on sale for $120 and is a color printer, scanner, copier, fax, supports AirPrint that I've been pretty impressed with the short time I've had it.
Agreed. I am done wasting money on ink that dries out. Occasional photo printing at nearby Costco, Walgreens, etc. is cheaper (less than 20 cents a print including photo paper).
 

NT1440

macrumors G5
May 18, 2008
12,366
15,535
Nowhere in the article it says that these are the first Airprint equipped printers from Canon and Canon have had Airprint capable printers for years and years so your question is kinda odd
HP has made Airplay standard, as it costs almost nothing to implement. So my question is why is this not standard practice across the printing world? They all support WifiDirect, Airplay can come along for the ride at no additional development cost, so why not?

I hope that clarifies, I realize re-reading my post didn't really make it clear.
 

rdlink

macrumors 68040
Nov 10, 2007
3,226
2,434
Out of the Reach of the FBI
Printers go into the same category as VCRs and landlines in my mind...
People still own those?

You have to pay $100+ upfront for the printer, and then you have to go back to the store and pay for paper and ink from time to time.

It's incredibly rare that you actually need to do anything with a printer anymore. I receive PDFs by email, fill them out in Preview or on my iPhone (the default mail app has nifty features for filling out PDFs), send them back. If I have to fax it instead, there are cheap online services that you can upload PDFs to have them faxed on your behalf. If you must have stuff printed for some reason, just use the printer at work or staples or the library or whatever - you were going to need to go out to buy ink and paper anyways.

They just make no sense. I stopped having a printer 4 years ago.
I see your point, but I don't agree 100%. I bought a solid Brother B&W laser printer a couple of years ago on Amazon's Black Friday sale for $130 that i print to maybe once every 3 or 4 months. But when I need it I have it, and I don't have to worry about going somewhere to print something. Because it's laser I don't have to worry about liquid ink, and I probably won't have to buy toner for it several years.
 

ThunderSkunk

macrumors 68030
Dec 31, 2007
2,998
2,575
Milwaukee Area
I'm still amazed to see printers the size of a large immovable space-hogging appliance.
We should have decent printers by now slightly larger than a thin stack of paper, than can fit in a computer bag abd connect via a single cable to a powered port.
 
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CarlJ

macrumors 601
Feb 23, 2004
4,791
7,881
San Diego, CA, USA
Everyone is rolling their eyes and asking the same question: "why mention AirPrint?"

The answer is quite obvious: if it were not for AirPrint, these printers would not have any specific tie to Apple, and thus would not be newsworthy on this site. Am I the only one who sees this?

I was actually happy to see the article, as I might consider a new printer in the future - my printer is an old Canon inkjet and the only thing it is lacking is AirPrint.

FWIW, my current/only printer is a Canon MP620, going on at least five years old, and I've been very happy with it. The ink tanks don't clog, they do run out occasionally, at which point I can replace only the empty ones (something that drew me to this printer initially - I got it back when Apple was offering heavily discounted printers with Mac purchases). I don't print a lot, but when I do it's incredibly handy to be able to just go ahead and do it right now without leaving the house or any other prep.

Latest thing printed? My 5yo niece has taken an interest in working out math problems, on paper. So I wrote a python script to generate web pages of random math problems with pretty colors and a good clean font for kids to emulate, and then printed out the result. I can't exactly hand her a PDF to scribble on instead (all my technical books are in PDF format, but PDF doesn't suit her needs). I gave her a small stack of pages, and she loves it. As a bonus, my kitten thinks a magical elf lives inside the printer, and is laser-focused on trying to get it every time I print something.
 
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sudo1996

Suspended
Aug 21, 2015
1,496
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I don't get AirPrint. Network printing has been around forever, and there are numerous standards for it that Mac OS has always supported. Why did Apple make yet another standard then make iOS only support it and not the other ones?
[doublepost=1469056888][/doublepost]All you people saying printers are useless clearly either don't remember being students or went to some high-tech school. I needed to print something every day in high school. I only stopped needing a printer after I finished my first and last college English class. If I were taking more of those stupid classes, I'd invest in a new printer for sure (since my HP printer broke). A B&W Canon printer that uses toner won't cost much to buy or maintain.

P.S. Having finally experienced HP enterprise, I'm fully convinced that HP is good for absolutely nothing. Their PCs, servers, and printers are all garbage. I thought all printers were just bad until I tried a Canon.
 
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