"Can't connect to iTunes, file missing"

Discussion in 'iPod' started by DaNerdling, Feb 28, 2017.

  1. DaNerdling macrumors newbie

    DaNerdling

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2017
    Location:
    Kawartha Lakes, Ontario
    #1
    Just a heads up, I no longer have the device in question as I dispatched it in a fit of rage, but years later I just wanna know what was wrong with it so hopefully someone can help me out.

    So I used to have an iPod Nano 4th Gen, and I had it for 4 months with no issues. Then one day out of nowhere, I tried to connect to iTunes and I got a message along the lines of "Cannot connect to iTunes, missing file" it may have quoted the file name but sadly I cannot recall it. So first I tried updating to iTunes 8 (the newest version at the time) and that did nothing. I tried resetting my iPod and that also did not work. I updated my software and again, nothing. I even tried to restore it, but it would only allow me to do so if it was connected to iTunes. (now do you see why I was so upset?) I finally ended up destroying it which I now realize was immature and silly, but I still would like to know (if at all possible) what actually happened and if there was something I could have done. Any help would be much appreciated.
     
  2. ApfelKuchen macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2012
    Location:
    Between the coasts
    #2
    Windows computer? If it was, then the notion of missing files (most likely, device drivers) makes some sense. Installations of iTunes on Windows are far more likely to be broken than on Mac. A full uninstall of iTunes, manually checking to be sure all iTunes software components were removed, might have been necessary, prior to a reinstall/upgrade attempt. You might have needed to confirm whether specific drivers were present, and if not, install them.

    Was there something you could have done? Most likely yes, had your emotions not intervened. Troubleshooting requires a certain amount of patience and calm. It also seems like you simply tried stuff, rather than seek out tech support articles that might have taken you through a logical, structured process.

    There's way too little info here to give you an answer that's likely to be satisfying. We could spend the next week spinning theories, but there'd be little or no chance of confirming which, if any, was correct. Just let the thing rest in peace.
     
  3. DaNerdling thread starter macrumors newbie

    DaNerdling

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2017
    Location:
    Kawartha Lakes, Ontario
    #3
    Ugh that's the one thing I didn't try! And yes it was a Windows computer. If I recall the "missing file" in question was on the PC end, not the iPod end. I'll bet that was it too. That is not the first time I've heard of iTunes and Windows not getting along either. I know it sounds stupid to want answers now but it's always bugged me but what you suggested makes sense. Thanks for the help!
     
  4. ApfelKuchen macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2012
    Location:
    Between the coasts
    #4
    It's kind of inevitable that Windows and iTunes (well, actually, the combination of iTunes and iPod/iPhone/iPad) would have a harder time getting along than MacOS and iTunes. It's not a knock on Microsoft or a boost for Apple.

    Microsoft's world, by necessity, must be one-size-fits-all. One OS, that runs on hardware built by any manufacturer, that must interface with externally-connected devices built by any manufacturer. It's up to the software developers and hardware makers to make their products compatible with Microsoft's OS. Microsoft cannot tweak the OS to suit the needs of a particular hardware maker - why should Microsoft spend its money to give just one of its many customers a business advantage? Next thing you know, the other customers will demand the same, or start loading Linux or ChromeOS on their machines. Further, since those modifications must be announced to all potential users of the OS, there's no way for any one manufacturer to maintain secrecy for a new product launch. So, when new hardware capabilities must be supported, they're going to be standards-based capabilities, which leave competing manufacturers less room for product differentiation.

    The answer is an OS that is heavily dependent on device drivers and other bolt-ons to the OS. While there's plenty of work done by Microsoft to help ensure all that third party hardware and software will play nicely together, the complexity of such a system ensures that conflicts and unexpected results will occur.

    Meantime, Apple can make wholistic engineering and marketing decisions. If it makes sense to bake a certain capability into the OS rather than depend on a kernel extension, device driver, etc., then it can be done, without prematurely breaching product secrecy, or asking the question, "Who's supposed to pay for this?"
     

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