Capturing TV images with a Sanyo Xacti 1000

Discussion in 'Digital Video' started by mauricemaurice, Sep 7, 2008.

  1. mauricemaurice macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2008
    #1
    When I film my TV screen, I get a "ceiling fan effect"

    Is it due to a difference in the frame rate?

    Please advise if anything can be done to suppress this effect?
     
  2. spinnerlys Guest

    spinnerlys

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2008
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    forlod bygningen
    #2
    What kind of TV set do you have?
    PAL, NTSC, HDTV?

    PAL has a frequency of 50 HZ, NTSC of around 60 HZ (actually 59.94 HZ) and HDTV I don't really know, depends on the resolution I suppose.

    But some TVs have higher frequencies than their broadcasting standard, to avoid flicker.

    Maybe your camera has a Shutter setting in the Menu, with which you can play and see how it works.
     
  3. mauricemaurice thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2008
    #3
    I have a PAL TV.
    I filmed the TV screen using the 1289 X 720 60 fps HR setting

    Your suggestion to try the SHUTTER setting sounded promising. I just happened to have it in front of me, set on "D" (whatever it means). I saw that the other options were B and C, maybe more, but by the time I walked to my TV set to try, the Xacti screen had shut itself off, and when I switched it on again, the SHUTTER menu had disappeared!

    I scanned all the menus in vain trying to locate that SHUTTER menu, but could not find it...

    Do you happen to know where it is?
     
  4. spinnerlys Guest

    spinnerlys

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2008
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    #4
    I doubt that your camera is capable of setting your shutter to various settings, as it's a feature found mostly in semi professional (and upwards) cameras. You have to look into the manual for this.

    And D, C and B don't seem to be that kind of settings, as shutter speed is more like 1/12, 1/25, 1/50, 1/60, 1/100, 1/125 and so on.

    By the way, PAL has a resolution of 768/720x576 with 50 interlaced frames.
     

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