Carbon Copy Cloner - basic questions

Discussion in 'Mac Apps and Mac App Store' started by VaatiKaiba, Jul 11, 2009.

  1. VaatiKaiba macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2008
    #1
    I've never used CCC before, and was just wondering if someone could answer some of my questions, as I'm replacing the hard drive in my MacBook:

    - If I back up everything to my Time Capsule using CCC, how do I boot again? Do I boot the disk image on the new HD?

    - Would doing this typically affect any of the licenses for my software? Will they all still be valid?

    - I believe that re-installing OS X can help give it a speed boost. Is this the same for using CCC, or would I have to reinstall afterwards (and again, what's the story with licenses this way as well?)

    Thanks in advance!

    EDIT: Thanks for the info, so two questions remain:

    1) When I'm backing up the bootable drive, should I be backing it up to my new (replacement) HD directly or can I move the drive from the TC to the new HD? As it's a 2.5" SATA drive, how can I connect it to my MacBook externally?

    2) Does archiving & installing / clean installing OS X affect software licenses?

    Thanks again!
     
  2. MacDawg macrumors P6

    MacDawg

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2004
    Location:
    "Between the Hedges"
    #2
    You would boot using the Option key and select the drive with the clone

    Licenses will be fine

    Doubt you will see a noticable speed boost either way

    Woof, Woof - Dawg [​IMG]
     
  3. miles01110 macrumors Core

    miles01110

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2006
    Location:
    The Ivory Tower (I'm not coming down)
    #3
    You have to plug the TC in with a USB cable and hold Option on Startup. The partition selection screen will appear, allowing you to choose which boot partition your machine uses.

    Yes. CCC really is a "carbon clone."
    Since it is an exact copy, you don't gain anything by restoring from a CCC backup. Do an Archive and Install or a clean install for best results on this matter.
     
  4. angelwatt Moderator emeritus

    angelwatt

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2005
    Location:
    USA
    #4
    For just for clarity, CCC can do file backups as well a bootable clones, but you have to choose the bootable option if you're wanting to boot from it. Seems obvious, but I just wanted to make sure that was clear.
     
  5. VaatiKaiba thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2008
    #5
    Thanks for the info, so two questions remain:

    1) When I'm backing up the bootable drive, should I be backing it up to my new (replacement) HD directly or can I move the drive from the TC to the new HD? As it's a 2.5" SATA drive, how can I connect it to my MacBook externally?

    2) Does archiving & installing / clean installing OS X affect software licenses?

    Thanks again!
     
  6. MacDawg macrumors P6

    MacDawg

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2004
    Location:
    "Between the Hedges"
    #6
    #1 - I am not certain what you are asking :eek:

    #2.1 Archive and Install will not affect your licenses
    #2.2 A clean install will mean you will need to reinstall your software

    Woof, Woof - Dawg [​IMG]
     
  7. VaatiKaiba thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2008
    #7
    What I'm trying to do is backup a bootable copy of my existing drive to a replacement HD which is bigger, faster, etc. Is there a way of connecting it (it's a SATA 2.5", MacBook standard) as an external drive to the MacBook (through USB, FireWire, etc, without a case), and do the backup directly to the new drive?
    If not, could I back it up to the TC, put the new HD in the MacBook, and then transfer the backup across via ethernet?

    Basically, how do I get it on the new drive?
     
  8. Pegasus665 macrumors member

    Pegasus665

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2009
    Location:
    Bristol, UK
    #8
    When using CCC to clone to a larger HDD that will replace the existing HDD in the uMBP (160GB to 500GB), is there a way for formating the rest of the 340GB? I want to make a primary partition for OS and 2 more in FAT32 to be accessible via linux live ISO and within my home Windows based network?
     
  9. MacDawg macrumors P6

    MacDawg

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2004
    Location:
    "Between the Hedges"
    #9
    Use Disk Utility to create the partitions first
    Then restore the clone to the partition you want

    Woof, Woof - Dawg [​IMG]
     
  10. JohnMC macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    May 5, 2006
    Location:
    Duluth, MN
    #10
    One option to your problem would be to use a second Macintosh as a "middle man". What you would need to do is: create a bootable clone of your old drive and store it on your TC. Then connect your MacBook to the second mac via Firewire. Boot your MacBook up in target disk mode and use CCC to clone the bootable image back to your new HDD.

    Your other option is to buy a cheap case for your new drive (~$20) and clone your old drive to the new one and change them out. The bonus with buying a case is you can use your old drive as an external once your project is complete.

    John
     
  11. akbc macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2008
    #11
    1) You can connect it to your MacBook using an USB Drive enclosure or FireWire (if your macbook supports it). I suggest USB since there's much more use of it in the future.
    I would back it up to the new HD directly unless you're thinking of re-installing the OS X itself. If you're going to re-install OS X, then I suggest you re-install OS X then use migration utility.

    2) CCC doesn't affect the licensing, but Migration utility and/or backing up from TC does. I had to register all my products again. But I have saved all the license info's in my e-mail (I usually buy from online stores) so I had no issues.

    Re-installing OS X wouldn't necessarily boost up your speed. Why don't you try using OnyX or the MacJanitor?
     
  12. sushi Moderator emeritus

    sushi

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2002
    Location:
    キャンプスワ&#
    #12
    This is a wonderful time to consider your backup strategy and begin with your MB HD upgrade.

    Over the years, I've used cloning as a major part of my backup strategy. What I do, is clone to alternating external HDs on a weekly basis. My external HDs are the same size as my internal HD. You can use separate enclosures for each HD or an enclosure that holds both HDs. I've used both methods but prefer one high quality external case that holds two HDs.

    In your case, since you have a MB with FW400, I would recommend an external FW400 enclosure that holds two HDs. I would stay away from USB as it will be very slow compared to FW when you clone.

    Once you have the external HD setup, you can begin cloning and replace your internal MB HD as follows:

    1. Clone internal HD to external HD A.
    2. Clone internal HD to external HD B (Optional, but recommended)
    3. Boot to external HD B. Assuming this works continue.
    4. Boot to external HD A. Assuming this works continue.
    5. While booted to external HD A, do a secure erase of your MB internal HD.
    6. Shut down you MB and external HDs.
    7. Replace MB internal HD with new internal HD.
    8. Boot to external HD A.
    9. Use Disk Utilities to format the new internal HD.
    10. Clone external HD A to the internal MB HD.
    11. Restart MB with internal HD.

    To keep straight when each clone was done, I date my backups. Then when cloning the following week, I clone to the oldest one.

    Now you may be thinking that you can use one external HD to clone. The issue here is that when you clone (make a copy) you will erase the external HD. If something happens to your internal once you've done this, you have no clone to restore from. That is why you need more than one external HD.

    Of course if your data is more sensitive you can clone on a daily basis if need be. Or you can use incremental cloning.
     

Share This Page