Career in the IT world

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by mac000, Nov 6, 2008.

  1. mac000 macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2005
    #1
    Help me out here.. after some consideration I'd like to finish my college major in computer information systems. Technology interests me and business so I'd like to get into that job field.

    Now, what am I suppose to do? I wont be officially changing my major until the spring... and I need to get a job asap too. Would I want to start thinking about certifications too? like A+ , cisco CCNP/CCNA certificates in the mean time?

    Where would I begin, should I try and get a help desk/technician job to start with? Where would I go from there?

    Basically what types careers could I get into in the IT world. I don't do programming, and I don't think I would want to.

    Is there someone that can formulate some-type of timeline for me on how things look in the IT world and what I need to do to get there?
     
  2. bradl macrumors 68040

    bradl

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2008
    #2

    Hmm...

    First thing I would suggest is to pick a cognitive area to concentrate in, while keeping your horizons broad. You're wanting IT, which is great, but you have so many different fields to go into: Software developer/engineer (coding), DBA, Sys Admin, Network Admin, Network security, and the hellhole known as tech support, just to name a few. Pick something out from that, and take some cert exams after getting your degree, as those exams will be concentrated towards a given field. A+ is always a good one to start out with, but then you could go MSCE, RHCE, RHSA, CCNA, Linux+, etc.

    The more you work hands on with what you're wanting to do, the faster things will go for you. If going for something like simple tech support, build and tinker with a PC. Sysadmin? Throw Linux, *BSD, or Solaris x86 on it, and head that way. once you get some of that under your belt, you can branch out. There would be no reason to not see yourself as a mid-level to senior network admin or sys admin in 5 years. Most places think you'll need 10 - 15 years experience for the senior levels, but that also includes managing a team as well. That's another aspect you'll get into further down. But just start out with a concentrated area, and work your way out.

    BL.
    15yr. Unix Sysadmin
     
  3. mac000 thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2005
    #3
    Thanks. Yeah I am interested in pursuing system administration, network admin, database administration, and network security.

    What's the way to go Microsoft certification or Cisco?
     
  4. bradl macrumors 68040

    bradl

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2008
    #4
    Well, Microsoft won't handle anything that Cisco will, and vice versa. If you're looking at windows administration, obviously, you're looking at all of the Microsoft certs. Solaris has their own set of certs, Linux+ is a bit more general, and Redhat has their own certs.

    As far as DBA.. Microsoft has their own certs for SQL Server, and Oracle has their own certs; those are the two biggest commercial DBMS out there.

    Start out with some books, for sure. Most sysadmins/network admins regard the books by O'Reilly as god, so definitely have a look at their books. Also, stop by Bookpool and just browse the books they have there. When you find something that interests you, have a look at it. That way you'll have some info to make a good decision on which way you'd like to go.

    BL.
     
  5. Queso macrumors G4

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2006
    #5
    Nothing beats experience. Yes, by all means get some certs, but don't be fooled into thinking this makes you an expert.

    As for which to go for, what side of IT do you enjoy doing?
     
  6. mac000 thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2005
    #6
    what are the different areas of IT?
     
  7. Queso macrumors G4

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2006
    #7
    For a start there's development, implementation and support to choose from. Then there are the various specialities, such as networking, databases, applications, OSs, or security. There's also project management. If you start with an idea of where you want to end up it's much easier to trace back what you need to learn or gain in order to accomplish it.
     
  8. Darth.Titan macrumors 68030

    Darth.Titan

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2007
    Location:
    Austin, TX
    #8
    These days trained IT folks are a dime a dozen. Unfortunately that doesn't mean anything as to the quality of those available. Finding a job in the IT field can be a challenge unless you know someone.

    My recommendation is when you start taking your IT classes, get to know your teachers. Work hard and even ask for references. Networking (the old-fashioned kind :D) is key to finding a job and picking up some experience. You never know who's gonna know someone who might be looking for someone like you.

    Good Luck.
     

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