Case for the Canon 450d?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by paulobrad, Jul 12, 2008.

  1. paulobrad macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2007
    Location:
    UK
    #1
  2. tunakuja macrumors newbie

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    Jan 26, 2008
    #2
    Can't go wrong with crumpler photobags. very good quality
     
  3. Everythingisnt macrumors 6502a

    Everythingisnt

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2008
    Location:
    Vancouver
    #3
    Here's a tip - avoid LowePro toploaders. They are the most utterly useless bags ever designed by an otherwise top-notch company. The only situation I could possibly imagine using one would be with a D700 coupled to a 200mm F/2 that I constantly needed to whip in and out of the bag..
     
  4. bandaros macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2008
    Location:
    L.A.
    #4
    I second the Crumpler bags suggestions - take a look at their selection ~ great build quality, aesthetically pleasing, and fairly (IMO) unassuming as far as camera bags go.

    The Lowepro Slingshots have gotten good reviews ~ check those out. The sizes depend on how much kit you have ~ the 200 is a decent size for an average kit (450d, 2-3 lenses, flash, batteries etc)...
     
  5. OreoCookie macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2001
    Location:
    Sendai, Japan
    #5
    I have a Loewe Pro bag (top loader, coincidentally), the quality is great. Eight months after I've bought it, I found out it has a built in rain protector (although it's rain proof without it already!).
     
  6. AlaskaMoose macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2008
    Location:
    Alaska
    #6
    The case you have shown above looks very nice, except that you would have to carry extra lenses and gear in another bag. For that reason I decided to buy a camera backpack I can carry on my back, and then swing it over my chest without having to remove it from my shoulder, and pull out the camera in a relatively fast motion. LowePro Slingshot AW200, and really like it. The quality is excellent. It housed my previous XT, and and now a Canon 40D with a few lenses.
    http://products.lowepro.com/product/SlingShot-200-AW,2035,4.htm
     
  7. Cybornut macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2004
    #7
    I won't recommend any cases. Except the occasional blizzards I guess.

    In cold temperatures, the batteries will not function well. But a run of the mill case will not solve this problem either.

    In extreme cold (arctic/antarctic), specially made electrically heated jackets can be bought, but at that level I would venture to guess one wouldn't be bringing a 450D, but a Mark II or Mark III, which are much tougher and can withstand a lot more "naked", not to mention have a lot more professional protection gear (at a horrible premium prices).

    I would venture to guess that "weather proofing" your camera against rain or sandstorms is your primary concern. My opinion is that situations where I felt uncomfortable with my old "walking around" FILM Canon EOS4 in the "nude" is rare, and in those cases I simply used 2 heavy duty "CLEAR" garbage bags with a hole for the lens where I've secured using the lens hood's threads. The eyepiece is also another hole with the rubber piece holding the edges. I have also in 1 occasion wrapped the whole camera with the material but also allow changes of film by masterfully applying silver duct tape (thank you Red Green Show).

    Rest of the time I trust Canon construction. Obviously the 450D is quite a bit more frail than the EOS4, but I believe it will hold up in moderate weather.

    The case you've shown above will definitely not guard your camera against heavy rain or sand. Remember that you still have to "decase" the camera to use it. There are professional grade weather seals kits for SLR and DSLR cameras, but those are custom orders (and cost more than I think is worth it for the few times I thought I needed it, see above "solution"), and I simply never bothered with them.

    The only thing that the case you've shown will benefit you would be to make you look "professional" to the amateur or semi-pro, and amateurish to the real professionals.

    MEANWHILE, congratulations on your purchase of an EOS 450D. I have just bought one for my digital walking around needs. It is also my 1st purchase of a DSLR (in my line of work, I hire photographers with REAL digital gear to do my "bidding", and have just recently abandoned film photography as my main hobby due to cost of processing and neg-scanning). It is by far the best semi-pro camera in the price range. The pixel count is astonishing at this level, and the new large LCD is quite a beauty to look at. A gem if you coupled that with its low power consumption (unless you shoot with the LCD as the viewfinder or "LiveView" I think it's called, which I think is unnecessary other than to make guys moving up from Point and Shoot digital cameras a bit more comfortable with DSLRs).

    I've also bought a cheap 75mm-300mm 4-5.6 EF III USM lens, even knowing the lens' flaws (I actually like the lens, not just for the price, but it does have a few "quirks" that needs to be kept in mind if you want to take usable pictures with it). I am just using it to bridge the gap before my compact film gears arrives from Shanghai with my other EF USM lenses.

    On the bag front, I bought it in China and there seems to be a promotion here where Canon gave out a large bag with each purchase of the 450D before July 27th (see attached picture) or bag and monopod for the higher series.
    I've just picked up the bag from Canon today after waiting for a week for it.
    The bag is nice and can hold quite a lot, including my 15inch Macbook Pro, and comes with a mesh bag for the wires. After my 4 other EF lenses arrives, I suspect I should be able to fit them all comfortably in this bag once I have the time to actually set the flaps in their correct positions.

    I walked around all day with this bag (in moist South China heat). And it feels very comfortable despite its size.

    I have used the Toploader for a few years, and I do like it a lot also, but since I don't need to look stylish, or do a lot of hiking, I find this new bag better suited for my purposes, which is to keep the maximum amount of my gear in one package for easy access, rather than a lot of everyday/outdoors/rough usage.

    I would try to inquire if Canon sells this bag to consumers.

    Time to put the Pelican Hard Travel Cases I had before in the closet for when I need to fly again with my gear.

    Just my 2 cents.
     

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  8. AlaskaMoose macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2008
    Location:
    Alaska
    #8
    Forgot to mention: I used a Rebel XT at least four winters in the interior of AK where the temperature drops to -65 sometimes. When taking photos at -20 or so, you get so cold that you have to get in your car to warm-up. To keep the batteries warm, just carry them in your pocket next to your body. However, you can purchase some of the chemical hand and feet warming bags as a sports store, and place one of them next to your camera in the backpack.
     
  9. Cybornut macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2004
    #9
    Those hand warmers were a godsend when I was in Montreal about a few years ago.

    It was -30 (not quite Alaska I know, but the few times I was in Alaska and N.W. Territories I didn't bring my camera because I knew it would be cold, and I'm not the one shooting anyways... some poor professional photographer was hehehe...), but my FILM EOS's new full battery died on my 1st day. My Sony semi-manual point-and-shoot wasn't even recognizing the power button, and refused to switch on until I kept it for a while in my inside my jeans (I also wore snow pants outside the jeans).

    2nd day I just kept a few of those warmers in the camera bag, and activated one when I feel that it's getting too cold inside it. As I kept my camera for less than 15min outside of the bag at a time, and at least 5min inside the bag, I'd not had more problems with batteries.

    But COLD is the real killer for digital gear, and something to really consider if you were going extreme weather.
     
  10. AlaskaMoose macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2008
    Location:
    Alaska
    #10
    You are correct. Cold can put a big drag on the camera or lens servo (motor), and either discharge the battery rapidly, or damage the motor (s). If carrying my camera in a pack for long periods of time, I activate and keep a hand warmer (the chemical-bad type) or two in the pack. When the camera is not in the pack and is very cold out, I take photos for ten to twenty minutes, and then put it back in the pack or in the car. I keep myself warm just like I do with the camera, by getting back in my car every 20 minutes or so :) One can keep a camera for days out there as long as the batteries and the camera are allowed to warm-up a little. I know of some photographers from the local university who have taken their Canon cameras on expeditions on Mount McKinley. They keep their cameras in packs like I mentioned, and place a couple of extra batteries in a small case next to their bodies. They circulate batteries from the camera to the pocket, and back. What happens to the battery when it get cold is that its capacity is reduced (not discharged).
     
  11. ButtUglyJeff macrumors 6502a

    ButtUglyJeff

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2008
    Location:
    New York. The state, not the toilet.
    #11
    I see you are from the UK. Get much snow there? ;)

    Are you looking for the smallest case possible, or to haul a good ammount of gear?
     
  12. paulobrad thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2007
    Location:
    UK
    #12
    Cheers guys, I was looking mainly for a bag for comfort and keeping the camera safe in fairly "average" conditions as I travel about. Not planning any trips to what I'd call extreme conditions.

    Went for the Crumpler Pretty Boy Maxi 4000 XL in Olive - thanks for the advice.
     

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