Cassini Captures Space Ravioli/Empanada.. argh, now I'm hungry!

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by bradl, Mar 10, 2017.

  1. bradl macrumors 68040

    bradl

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2008
    #1
    I'm not sure what the hell it is, but dammit all if it isn't making me hungry!

    http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-...may-be-tiny-but-it-sure-looks-like-a-mouthful

    [​IMG]




    After this, anybody up for Italian tonight? :D

    BL.
     
  2. ucfgrad93 macrumors P6

    ucfgrad93

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2007
    Location:
    Colorado
    #2
    Dammit, now I want some Italian food!
     
  3. kryten2, Mar 10, 2017
    Last edited: Mar 11, 2017

    kryten2 macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2012
    Location:
    Belgium
  4. obeygiant macrumors 68040

    obeygiant

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2002
    Location:
    totally cool
    #4
    Cassini now in Grand Finale stage:

    The spacecraft's handlers had been calling this upcoming period "the proximal orbits" because Cassini will be so close to the planet, but they felt this apellation lacked pizzazz. So in April, they asked the public to vote for names provided by mission team members or suggest monikers of their own.

    More than 2,000 people took part, NASA officials said. The team took the public's input into account, then decided to go with the "Cassini Grand Finale."

    "We chose a name for this mission phase that would reflect the exciting journey ahead while acknowledging that it's a big finish for what has been a truly great show," Earl Maize, Cassini project manager at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, said in a statement.

    Cassini launched toward Saturn in October 1997 and arrived in orbit around the ringed planet 10 years ago yesterday (June 30). The $3.2 billion mission — a collaboration involving NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency — also dropped a lander named Huygens onto Saturn's huge moon Titan in January 2005.​

    Sorry to see her go.

    Next up: Uranus and Neptune twin mission?
     
  5. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2008
    Location:
    The Far Horizon
    #5
    Cassini is now entering the final fortnight of its amazing and incredible voyage; this is simply fantastic and well worth keeping a close eye on.
     
  6. bradl thread starter macrumors 68040

    bradl

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2008
    #6
    I still want that Empanada. :p

    BL.
     
  7. obeygiant macrumors 68040

    obeygiant

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2002
    Location:
    totally cool
  8. ucfgrad93 macrumors P6

    ucfgrad93

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2007
    Location:
    Colorado
    #9
  9. MacNut macrumors Core

    MacNut

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2002
    Location:
    CT
    #10
  10. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2008
    Location:
    The Far Horizon
    #11
    Absolutely fantastic, and what an exquisite - and downright beautiful - image. Awesome. Thanks fro sharing.

    Spectacular but sad. An amazing mission.

    Farewell, Cassini - what a superlative programme, voyage and mission.
     
  11. obeygiant macrumors 68040

    obeygiant

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2002
    Location:
    totally cool
    #12


    Cassini Grand Finale Video



    At around 7:31 AM eastern time, the Cassini-Huygensspacecraft disintegrated and plunged into Saturn, becoming the only man-made object ever to touch our solar system's second largest planet. "The signal from the spacecraft is gone and within the next 45 seconds, so will be the spacecraft," said NASA JPL Cassini program manager Earl Maize. "This has been an incredible mission, an incredible spacecraft, and you're all an incredible team."


    In a fitting end to the tough spacecraft, which outlasted its projected mission lifespan by over nine years, Cassini kept sending science data back to Earth a full 30 seconds longer than expected. It spent that precious half-minute sampling molecules in the planet's atmosphere. "Those last few seconds were our first taste of the atmosphere of Saturn," JPL Director Mike Watkins said. "Who knows how many PhD theses are in that data?"

    The spacecraft didn't quite die when it hit Saturn, as a tiny trace of it -- its final radio signals -- reached Earth 83 minutes later. It was a billion miles aways when it crashed on Saturn, a gas giant 764 times larger than Earth by volume. Despite minimal risks, NASA, JPL and its partners crashed and burned it on Saturn to ensure that any stray microbes wouldn't get to Titan and other moons, which hold the potential to support life.

    During its mission, Cassini made numerous scientific discoveries and significantly changed the way we think about our solar system. Some of the highlights include finding vertical structures on Saturn's rings, landing the Huygens probe on Titan, photographing Titan's surprisingly Earth-like frozen landscape, finding saline flats that show Titan could support life and finding water on the tiny moon Enceladus

    link
     
  12. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2008
    Location:
    The Far Horizon
    #13
    Fantastic.

    Great post and thanks for sharing.

    What an amazing and extraordinary mission.
     

Share This Page