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Lock manufacturer Yale at CES 2017 this week announced that its lineup of Real Living Assure smart locks will be compatible with HomeKit by the end of March. By then, new Assure locks will be sold with a HomeKit module, which will also be available to purchase separately to add to existing Assure locks.

yale-smart-locks.jpg

HomeKit support will enable users to lock and unlock their homes by using Apple's new Home app on iOS 10 or the free Yale Assure companion app (U.S. and Canada only) for iPhone and iPad. Homeowners can also use Siri voice commands such as "Hey Siri, lock the front door" and "Hey Siri, is my front door locked?"

Users are also able to check a lock's battery and current lock status, create up to 12 unique pin codes, customize lock and notification settings, name a lock, and add a new lock through the Yale Assure app. Users with a third-generation Apple TV or later can control HomeKit accessories in the Home app while away from home.


The deadbolt locks feature a backlit capacitive touchscreen keypad for keyless entry. If a smartphone is unavailable, users can enter a unique 4-8 digit pin code to enter the home. The Bluetooth-enabled lock is powered by four AA batteries included, or users can touch a 9V battery to the battery terminals at the bottom as a backup option.

Yale said the HomeKit module will also be compatible with its recently launched nexTouch Wireless smart lock targeted at small business owners. The new HomeKit-enabled smart locks and standalone HomeKit module are expected to be available for purchase on Yale's website at some point in March. Pricing was not disclosed.

The non-HomeKit Real Living Assure locks retail for $199.99 on Yale's website in polished brass, satin nickel, and dark gray colors. ZigBee and Z-Wave modules are also available for $50 each. Here's an installation video.

Other HomeKit-enabled smart locks include the Schlage Sense and August Smart Lock.

Article Link: CES 2017: Yale to Add HomeKit to Select Smart Locks by Late March
 

cue003

macrumors member
May 22, 2010
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The big question here will be if you can get alerts/notifications based on the pin used vs just the door was unlocked. It says you can create 12 pins and I would like to create a pin and assign to say the cleaning crew, the in laws, the kids etc and I want to get alerted to WHO is entering based on the name assigned to the pin.

I already have multiple of the zwave Yale locks that can already accomplish the above mentioned notification but it required having a separate controller and some configurations etc etc. however if the HomeKit lock can do what I mentioned above (and I can get rid of the zwave bridge) I will switch over immediately when they become available. If not, the. I say this is a FAIL! Smart Lock should provide smart notifications.
 
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CarlJ

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Feb 23, 2004
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Apple has actually put a lot of effort into security for HomeKit, much more so than most of the other protocols related to Internet-of-Things devices, and I'm very happy I can tell Siri to turn various lights on and off, but it's gonna be another decade or so before I put much trust in electronic home door locks (bad guys being able to make my lights blink doesn't worry me too much). I recall seeing a number of such locks previously released that had pretty serious failings. We need a few more cycles of real world deployment of "new improved" models, followed by flaws being uncovered...
 
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Deelron

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Jan 30, 2009
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Honest question- how secure is it? To be the best when even the best isn't that good wouldn't make any lock that desirable.

If I recall there was an article a while ago covering that subject, and that Apple's instance on over security was hindering adoption.

Also they're all more secure then a brick through a window.
 
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avanpelt

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Jun 2, 2010
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If someone wants to get into a home badly enough, they'll just shatter a window, break the door down, or destroy the deadbolt. These "smart" locks are all about convenience, nothing more.

A few years ago, I was locked out of my home in the middle of the night and, unfortunately, I had to call one of those fly-by-night locksmiths because none of the reputable companies in my area were answering their phones at midnight.

The guy who showed up looked like he could've just gotten out from doing 5 to 10 for breaking and entering. He had the deadbolt drilled out and my back door open in less than three minutes.
 
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DeepIn2U

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May 30, 2002
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HomeKit is the most secure protocol of all smart protocols currently out.

This is completely amazing news and I see no thee USA universities falling suit as well.

Funny this is one of many areas where android fans can claim we had it first yet cannot hold a damn candle to today cause the standard is not yet there on that platform.
[doublepost=1483842646][/doublepost]
If someone wants to get into a home badly enough, they'll just shatter a window, break the door down, or destroy the deadbolt. These "smart" locks are all about convenience, nothing more.

A few years ago, I was locked out of my home in the middle of the night and, unfortunately, I had to call one of those fly-by-night locksmiths because none of the reputable companies in my area were answering their phones at midnight.

The guy who showed up looked like he could've just gotten out from doing 5 to 10 for breaking and entering. He had the deadbolt drilled out and my back door open in less than three minutes.

There is a lot more security I'm sure Yale will implement with thick metal doors, reinforced hinges that are non typical like home door hinges as well as thick windows that don't break with a brick through at 20kmh from 5ft away. Many of the doors using such looks are indoors and don't have windows such as labs.
 
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konqerror

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Dec 31, 2013
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but it's gonna be another decade or so before I put much trust in electronic home door locks

Doesn't matter one bit. Pick resistance of residential door locks is zero. As a complete amateur, it took me three minutes flat to pick a door for a neighbor who got locked out.

Plus, the drug addicts who break in... they'll just kick your door down.

There is a lot more security I'm sure Yale will implement...

Yale makes commercial hardware but their residential equipment, so that they can be keyed alike, are Kwikset compatible, and are not anything special. Their deadbolts are ANSI Grade 2, which you can easily buy one class better.
 
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vcboard

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Oct 15, 2016
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I've been using the Schlage Sense with HomeKit for almost a year. It was spotty at first, but after many firmware iterations and iOS releases, it's pretty good now, connected thru Bluetooth. Just that the remote Homekit via Apple TV is still slow.

You'll get notification for unlocks. And when pin is entered manually, you can check in history the name that you assigned the pin for. Another thing is it's ANSI grade 1.
 
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Relentless Power

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Jul 12, 2016
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I've been using the Schlage Sense with HomeKit for almost a year. It was spotty at first, but after many firmware iterations and iOS releases, it's pretty good now, connected thru Bluetooth. Just that the remote Homekit via Apple TV is still slow.

You'll get notification for unlocks. And when pin is entered manually, you can check in history the name that you assigned the pin for. Another thing is it's ANSI grade 1.

Personally, my preference has been with Schlage. They continue to improve all the time and I like idea of the Pin access.
 
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prowlmedia

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Jan 26, 2010
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Alexa! What's home kit?

Alexa why don't you work when I am not in the room?
[doublepost=1483877466][/doublepost]They have also released this for the U.K/euro market were we tend to have multipoint locks

http://www.yale.co.uk/en/yale/couk/smart-living/smart-locks/conexis-l1

This too will be HomeKit compatible but seems like a backwards step from the previous versions as you have to have a card / fob / phone to open it!!

I have the key free model which they still do and has a keypad + zwave and will have a HomeKit module too. But you can't have both which is a shame as it's tied into my smartthings
 
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noxivs

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Sep 16, 2015
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Users with a third-generation Apple TV or later can control HomeKit accessories in the Home app while away from home.
I thought Apple took away the remote homekit control capability from the 3rd gen Apple TVs?
 
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Carlanga

macrumors 604
Nov 5, 2009
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Honest question- how secure is it? To be the best when even the best isn't that good wouldn't make any lock that desirable.
It's better than the rest. Many of the other ones came out long ago and security if any over the air is subpar. The other ones use from none to 128bit encryption only and HomeKit has a coprocessor for security with 3072-bit keys and Curve key exchange system on top of that.
At the end for important stuff like deadbolts and such I would go with a HomeKit as for the rest it depends if you don't mind if someone in the future hacks your lights which is not as important as letting someone come trough our door like they own the place.
 
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Mac Fly (film)

macrumors 68000
Feb 12, 2006
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Will these locks subsequently unlock and lock with when you walk up to them and when you leave with your phone remaining in your pocket?

Otherwise keying in a code is easier than taking out your phone to summon Siri to ask her to... Summoning Siri for scenes and lights and heating and things makes sense sitting in your home or lying in your bed, but not upon getting out of your car to open your door.
 
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Arran

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Mar 7, 2008
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Atlanta, USA
I will never put an electronic lock on my house. Ever...
I agree. Although, I might be tempted once these things are totally stable and proven.

On a few occasions I've come downstairs in the morning to a cold house with my Nest thermostats inexplicably flashing a red/green LED. On a few other occasions, I've come downstairs to a few random Hue lightbulbs switched on. Different rooms, different control groups. Just random.

Now, I can live with those little hiccups, but I really don't want to find my doors inexplicably unlocked. For a similar reason I won't hook-up my garage doors to the Internet. Call me old-fashioned.
 
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PinkyMacGodess

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Mar 7, 2007
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I agree. Although, I might be tempted once these things are totally stable and proven.

On a few occasions I've come downstairs in the morning to a cold house with my Nest thermostats inexplicably flashing a red/green LED. On a few other occasions, I've come downstairs to a few random Hue lightbulbs switched on. Different rooms, different control groups. Just random.

Now, I can live with those little hiccups, but I really don't want to find my doors inexplicably unlocked. For a similar reason I won't hook-up my garage doors to the Internet. Call me old-fashioned.

There is nothing wrong with being 'old fashioned'. I woke up once to find my garage door opened. The damned thing opened itself a couple more times before I replaced it. Was supposed to be 'secure'. Yeah...

I don't bank online, I don't pay bills online, I will fight for my right to write checks and mail payments with my dying breath. Call me a rebel, but I'm not a sheep...
 
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Chupa Chupa

macrumors G5
Jul 16, 2002
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Will these locks subsequently unlock and lock with when you walk up to them and when you leave with your phone remaining in your pocket?

Don't know how the Yale works. I have an August Lock which works with geofencing. It is set (with my phone) when I go more than 1/4 mile from my house. When I return it will automatically unlock. Unfortunately it doesn't work in reverse -- to lock the door. It will only auto-lock by time, not distance so I have that feature turned off lest I lock myself out. You can use Siri to lock or unlock the door. I find using my key to lock the door faster than waiting on Siri.
 
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TheRealTVGuy

macrumors 6502a
Jul 21, 2010
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Orlando, FL
I just hope Apple hurries up and eventually allows some sort of access to the NFC system on the Apple Watch. The fact that I have to have physical house keys or a phone in my pocket when I go running just to lock or unlock my door is ridiculous. I should be able to lock and unlock my door using my Apple Watch and just my Apple Watch. No Bluetooth, no Wi-Fi, no tethered iPhone, just my watch. Just like Apple Pay.
 
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ksnell

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Aug 26, 2012
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Apple has actually put a lot of effort into security for HomeKit, much more so than most of the other protocols related to Internet-of-Things devices, and I'm very happy I can tell Siri to turn various lights on and off, but it's gonna be another decade or so before I put much trust in electronic home door locks (bad guys being able to make my lights blink doesn't worry me too much). I recall seeing a number of such locks previously released that had pretty serious failings. We need a few more cycles of real world deployment of "new improved" models, followed by flaws being uncovered...

Don't mean to be the bearer of bad news but as they say, "locks just keep the honest people out." That goes for traditional or smart locks.

Unless you live in a literal castle - if someone wants in, they are going to get in.
 
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