Charger quits, computer shuts off

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by wellsdeep, Feb 13, 2016.

  1. wellsdeep macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2016
    #1
    A glass of water spilled on my Macbook Pro, and it immediately shut off. I let it dry for a week. It won't turn on without the charger. When I plugged the charger in, the charging light came on for five minutes or so before it appeared to short out (charger's light flashed a few times before stopping). Pulling the charger out of the MagSafe connection and putting it back in did nothing. But if I waited awhile (an hour or two) and plugged it back in, it would light back up. After several times of doing this, I plugged it in, saw the charging light was on, and turned on the computer. It booted right up. After five minutes or so, the charger light went off and the computer shut off. I'm trying to pinpoint the damage and figure out how repairable it would be. Any ideas?
     
  2. DeltaMac macrumors 604

    DeltaMac

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2003
    Location:
    Delaware
    #3
    Yes, I have an idea.
    You have damage from a liquid spill. (sorry to be "captain obvious" :D )

    Some folks have a liquid spill, dry it out sufficiently, and move on within a few days, with no ill affects.
    Others have what appears to be minor, then do little or nothing about it - or even go to some pains to disassemble for drying. Despite those attempts, the logic board may be permanently damaged, and the damage quickly prevents any use without major repairs (and likely significant expense). There's a whole range of possible outcomes, with many of them resulting in bad news.

    You did not say anything about what you found when you removed the bottom cover - ALWAYS take the bottom cover off when you experience any kind of potential liquid damage, as soon as possible after the event - within minutes, if that is possible. You may be better able to decide where liquid damage or corrosion exist inside.
    If it has been more than a week, it's too late to do that initial job of effective drying, which may or may not lessen potential effects resulting from that event. After a week, the damage is likely done (irreversible), and your best results will be an actual repair. (Don't get sucked in by the old myth about putting your Mac in rice :D )
    Judging by your symptoms now, that will likely mean replacing the logic board.
     
  3. wellsdeep thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2016
    #4
    Taking it apart is great if you have the tools, which I didn't (also didn't have a 10 pound bag of rice, which...do people understand how rice works?). Regardless, took the back off today, found some corrosion on the logic board. Cleaned it off. Am still waiting on tools to come in to take the logic board out to see what the other side looks like. Replacing the logic board isn't a big deal--it's an early 2011 Macbook, logic board's are pretty cheap--but if there was some way around doing that, I'd love to know.
     
  4. DeltaMac macrumors 604

    DeltaMac

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2003
    Location:
    Delaware
    #5
    Hmm... Yes, and I do understand that rice is largely an old-wives tale that seldom is of any practical help.

    I would point out that you see corrosion on the bottom of the board, so likely more will be on the TOP, after pulling the logic board out. I guess you are already aware of that.
    I HAVE had one or two MacBooks that I was able to clean corrosion, and had no more difficulty after that with actual use of the macbooks. The one I most often use is a 2008, which had a minor liquid spill that I cleaned up sometime in early 2009, and it continues to work. Lucky, I think! I was working in an authorized service provider at that time, and saw quite a few bad spills. They are never fun. One tip is to do what you can as quickly as you can.
    I doubt that cleanup will really help you after taking this long to start, but good luck anyway!

    Finally, yes, there's a way around removing or replacing the logic board.
    I remember signs around computer terminals when I first began using them - in early 1968, technology course.
    The signs read:
    That remains a good plan, I think.
    Just thought I'd point that out... :D
    Sorry, I don't really have good encouragement for you. I've just seen too many almost-soggy computers in my service life. (the weirdest was the one from a student who kept a beaker of urine on a shelf directly above the computer. Can you guess what happened next?)
     

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