iPhone XS Max Charging overnight safe for battery?

Aljon

macrumors member
Original poster
Aug 1, 2019
50
6
Hello, this is my first time to charged overnight total of 7hours. Im using a charger that comes with the box, is this a good habit to charged every overnight? How can does affect the battery?. Or it's better to charged and remove when it reaches to 100%
 

riteshritesh

macrumors member
Mar 18, 2016
90
51
Mumbai INDIA
Hello, this is my first time to charged overnight total of 7hours. Im using a charger that comes with the box, is this a good habit to charged every overnight? How can does affect the battery?. Or it's better to charged and remove when it reaches to 100%
Not sure if it is healthy or not, but I have been doing it for the past 7 years, without any phone exploding or dying or battery deteriorating unusually.
 

user_xyz

macrumors regular
Nov 30, 2018
239
170
Hello, this is my first time to charged overnight total of 7hours. Im using a charger that comes with the box, is this a good habit to charged every overnight? How can does affect the battery?. Or it's better to charged and remove when it reaches to 100%
Charging automatically stops when it reaches 100%.
No Problem leaving it plugged in all night!!
 
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EM2013

macrumors 68000
Sep 2, 2013
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Yes it’s safe. I along with many others have been doing this for years.

Said it once and I’ll say it again, don’t know why people refuse to charge their phones overnight.
 

Marshall73

macrumors 68000
Apr 20, 2015
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Apple introduced optimised charging. It works out when you get up and charges to 80% then will charge to 100% prior to you getting up in the morning. When you plug in the phone at night it pops up a notification on the lock screen which says when it will start charging to 100%
 
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Aljon

macrumors member
Original poster
Aug 1, 2019
50
6
Apple introduced optimised charging. It works out when you get up and charges to 80% then will charge to 100% prior to you getting up in the morning. When you plug in the phone at night it pops up a notification on the lock screen which says when it will start charging to 100%
Do i need to turn on System Customization and Wifi to work the "Optimized Battery Charging"?
 

Tsepz

macrumors 68040
Jan 24, 2013
3,227
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Johannesburg, South Africa
Just use and enjoy your phone, the battery capacity will go down no matter what “tricks” you try. Some people have taken delivery if phones sitting at 99% battery health and are enjoying regardless.

Personally I charge overnight every night and my XS Max is still at 100% Health after 6months of that.
 

Aydy

macrumors 6502a
Nov 22, 2015
553
373
Personally I charge overnight every night and my XS Max is still at 100% Health after 6months of that.
mine is also at 100%. I almost want it to go down a point just to get it over and done with. Weird to say but I think I’ll relax more when I’m not watching, waiting for it to begin. When it starts I will find the health meter easier to ignore
 
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Tsepz

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Jan 24, 2013
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Johannesburg, South Africa
mine is also at 100%. I almost want it to go down a point just to get it over and done with. Weird to say but I think I’ll relax more when I’m not watching, waiting for it to begin. When it starts I will find the health meter easier to ignore
Haha, ditto!

I feel exactly the same, but I have got myself to ignore it more now, it’s only when I see topics like this that I am like: “oh yeah, wonder where mine is now !?”
 
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TheIntruder

macrumors 65816
Jul 2, 2008
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Exposing a user-facing numerical value to battery health is not one of the wisest UI decisions Apple has made.

At best, it is an calculated estimate, and only provides fodder for the OCD crew to needlessly obsess over.

It's puzzling, given the extent to which Apple usually tries to insulate users from technical details and other minutiae that are not clearly understood by most, and ripe for confusion.

Maybe next, it also can replace the signal strength bars with the actual dBm values instead?

Then, cue countless the "But my iPhone only gets -98 dBm and hers gets -92 dBm!!" threads.
 
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Jim Lahey

macrumors 6502a
Apr 8, 2014
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Sunnyvale
My understanding is that devices these days take power directly from the mains when connected to a power outlet. The battery charges and is then disconnected and left at ‘100%’ while the device continues to draw power from the mains without using the battery. When disconnected, the device once again begins to deplete the battery.

I’m sure it’s not quite that straightforward, but someone thought of this a long time ago and designed power management systems that would cope with nightly charging of batteries that need nightly charging. Don’t worry about it.
 

Jim Lahey

macrumors 6502a
Apr 8, 2014
723
1,230
Sunnyvale
Exposing a user-facing numerical value to battery health is not one of the wisest UI decisions Apple has made.

At best, it is an calculated estimate, and only provides fodder for the OCD crew to needlessly obsess over.

It's puzzling, given the extent to which Apple usually tries to insulate users from technical details and other minutiae that are not clearly understood by most, and ripe for confusion.

Maybe next, it also can replace the signal strength bars with the actual dBm values instead?

Then, cue countless the "But my iPhone only gets -98 dBm and hers gets -92 dBm!!" threads.
I don't necessarily disagree, but I recall that this feature was introduced after people started crying over performance throttling with degraded batteries?
 
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JPack

macrumors 601
Mar 27, 2017
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My understanding is that devices these days take power directly from the mains when connected to a power outlet. The battery charges and is then disconnected and left at ‘100%’ while the device continues to draw power from the mains without using the battery. When disconnected, the device once again begins to deplete the battery.

I’m sure it’s not quite that straightforward, but someone thought of this a long time ago and designed power management systems that would cope with nightly charging of batteries that need nightly charging. Don’t worry about it.
That's exactly what's harmful about overnight charging. Li-ion batteries are negatively affected by extreme states of charge, whether it's 0% or 100%. That's one of the reasons why the iPhone is shipped (and stored) with 50-70% charge.

Until recently, Apple has always focused on convenience rather than battery longevity.
 
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aakshey

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Jun 13, 2016
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That's exactly what's harmful about overnight charging. Li-ion batteries are negatively affected by extreme states of charge, whether it's 0% or 100%. That's one of the reasons why the iPhone is shipped (and stored) with 50-70% charge.
Not necessarily. I have received iDevices with 85ish or more charge as well.
 

C DM

macrumors Sandy Bridge
Oct 17, 2011
48,133
16,398
That's exactly what's harmful about overnight charging. Li-ion batteries are negatively affected by extreme states of charge, whether it's 0% or 100%. That's one of the reasons why the iPhone is shipped (and stored) with 50-70% charge.

Until recently, Apple has always focused on convenience rather than battery longevity.
It’s not exactly harmful just not optimal.
- - Post merged: - -

My understanding is that devices these days take power directly from the mains when connected to a power outlet. The battery charges and is then disconnected and left at ‘100%’ while the device continues to draw power from the mains without using the battery. When disconnected, the device once again begins to deplete the battery.

I’m sure it’s not quite that straightforward, but someone thought of this a long time ago and designed power management systems that would cope with nightly charging of batteries that need nightly charging. Don’t worry about it.
As I recall, the battery will charge to 100% and then stop and the phone will continue running off the battery and once it drops a bit the charging will kick in again to get it back to 100%.
 

TheIntruder

macrumors 65816
Jul 2, 2008
1,031
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I don't necessarily disagree, but I recall that this feature was introduced after people started crying over performance throttling with degraded batteries?
It was, but Apple could have simply given general descriptors like "Good," "Normal," "Marginal" or something similar.

No doubt there would still be questions, but at least it would have prevented the "My new phone has 99% battery health!" type posts.

These forums are already overripe with battery topics where those who haven't done any research ignore general understanding and proudly proclaim that "I've kept my phone between 90-100% most of the time, and battery health is still 100%!" ergo, it's false.

That's like proclaiming that they smoke three packs a day, and can still run a marathon, or bench 200, ergo smoking has no effect on one's health.

One can choose whether to honor best practices, live a healthy lifestyle, or not, but there is no doubt that bad habits can have adverse effects, even if your one's own anecdotal experiences seem to prove otherwise.

As a practical matter, no one is obligated to follow practices to maximum the battery life of a device expected to last a few years, but the principles still apply.

And, going back to the matter of "Throttle Gate," while it may have been questionable for Apple to quietly compensate for aged batteries by reducing performance, the reaction among the general public only helped illustrate how little they know about batteries.
 
Last edited:

tonybarnaby

macrumors 68000
Dec 3, 2017
1,861
1,262
It was, but Apple could have simply given general descriptors like "Good," "Normal," "Marginal" or something similar.

No doubt there would still be questions, but at least it would have prevented the "My new phone has 99% battery health!" type posts.

These forums are already overripe with battery topics where those who haven't done any research ignore general understanding and proudly proclaim that "I've kept my phone between 90-100% most of the time, and battery health is still 100%!" ergo, it's false.

That's like proclaiming that they smoke three packs a day, and can still run a marathon, or bench 200, ergo smoking has no effect on one's health.

One can choose whether to honor best practices, live a healthy lifestyle, or not, but there is no doubt that bad habits can have adverse effects, even if your one's own anecdotal experiences seem to prove otherwise.

As a practical matter, no one is obligated to follow practices to maximum the battery life of a device expected to last a few years, but the principles still apply.

And, going back to the matter of "Throttle Gate," while it may have been questionable for Apple to quietly compensate for aged batteries by reducing performance, the reaction among the general public only helped illustrate how little they know about batteries.
I recently picked up a new 8+ on swappa after several days of scouring the site. It's amazing how in pretty much every single for sale post, someone(usually more than one person) will ask what the battery health is. When they hear 84%, they equate that to a phone with an 84% charge, not knowing that a lithium ion is at end of life once it hits 80%. I saw a phone that would have been perfect for me, but it had 82% battery health. A new battery for an 8+ is only $49, but an extra $49 got me a brand new 8+ for $425, instead of a mint one with a shot battery for $380. I guess the main point is it's strange to see so many people asking about battery health when they have no clue that 80% is end of life. If the scale was the same as the charge level, they would see how worn out 84% is. I don't ever say anything, but you know those people will buy the phone, get horrible battery life and then blame their apps or the phone, when the battery is the culprit. And then you have people calling Apple about getting a replacement because their phone dropped to 99% in a month. We need new battery tech.
 

Jim Lahey

macrumors 6502a
Apr 8, 2014
723
1,230
Sunnyvale
That's exactly what's harmful about overnight charging. Li-ion batteries are negatively affected by extreme states of charge, whether it's 0% or 100%. That's one of the reasons why the iPhone is shipped (and stored) with 50-70% charge.

Until recently, Apple has always focused on convenience rather than battery longevity.
Except they don't charge to 100% anyway, even before the 80% option was recently added. They display 100% but that is not the real value.
 
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