cheap and simple home recording studio

Discussion in 'Buying Tips and Advice' started by sculfort, Nov 28, 2010.

  1. sculfort macrumors member

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2008
    #1
    I have a macbook pro and am looking to set up a cheap and simple home recording studio if you wanna call it that. I have absolutely no idea what is needed in terms of hardware, software, cables. Now when i say studio i will have no instruments being plugged into anything. It will simply be for recording audio and using software for the music/beats. Any suggestions for everything listed above. Hardware needed, software needed, cables needed. Anything helps.

    Thanks
     
  2. TheyCallMeSaint macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2010
    #2
    Where are you recording this mystical audio from? ;)
     
  3. andrewsd macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2008
    Location:
    USA/BAYERN(bavaria)
    #3
    need more info

    I am with him. We need a little more info to really help you out..:rolleyes:
     
  4. filmweaver macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2008
  5. johnpeterson macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2010
    #5
    thanks for the link filmweaver. i'll give this one a try too.
     
  6. dXTC macrumors 68020

    dXTC

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2006
    Location:
    Up, up in my studio, studio
    #6
    First, start with GarageBand as your recording studio software; it came free with your MBP, and is a good "beginner" audio workstation app.

    In order to record vocals or acoustic guitars, you will need a microphone of some sort. filmweaver's recommendation is good for live/"field" recording. For the studio, you may want something that can capture more nuance. I recommend Audio Technica's AT2020 USB or a Blue Snowball; both connect via USB so that you don't have to have a separate mixer.

    You could use GarageBand's built-in virtual keyboard for constructing music and beats, but you'll tire of it quickly. For better hands-on beat construction, the Akai MPC-26 will do the trick. For playing musical passages, a two- or three-octave MIDI keyboard controller, by either M-Audio or Edirol, will do nicely. I have a M-Audio O2. All of these will control GarageBand's built-in synths. Some of these USB controllers are sometimes packaged with "lite" versions of pro software like Logic Express or Cubase; that'll give you a feel of what's possible beyond GarageBand.

    These can be found at several places online, including Sweetwater.com, Musician's Friend, or Music123.com.
     
  7. sculfort thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2008
    #7
    good advice guys..keep it coming. Could you link to the correct Akai MPC-26 you are talking about? I tried to find it but there seems to be a ton of different variations with different number. thanks
     
  8. SatyMahajan macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2009
    Location:
    Cambridge, MA
    #8
    The LOWEST COST SOLUTION (~$560)

    Apogee ONE ($249) - has a built-in condenser mic and single instrument input, USB, industry-standard pre-amps, excellent output and portability
    GarageBand ($0) - Free, great instruments, limited, Jam Packs are expensive
    iDrum ($59) - Great software drum machine for making beats
    M-Audio Axiom 25 2nd Gen ($250) - Portable, Good keys, ability to control Garageband

    The MEDIUM COST SOLUTION (~$700)

    Remove iDrum (-$59)
    Add Logic Express (+$199) - Has UltraBeat which is an amazing drum machine. Logic has the ability to turn any sample into a software instrument and gives you choices to break down by rhythm or poly, perfect for sampling your favorite drum loops as new instruments.
     
  9. dXTC macrumors 68020

    dXTC

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2006
    Location:
    Up, up in my studio, studio
    #9
    There are several models in the Akai MPC series. Apparently, the higher the number, the more controls and capabilities of the machine. You might be able to find a refurb MPC-16 for cheap, and it's a good start.

    You'll also want to consider ByteOfApple's suggestions, especially, the M-Audio Axiom 25, which has a two-octave keyboard and eight drum pads built into the same machine.
     

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