Check/Repair disk permissions?

Discussion in 'OS X El Capitan (10.11)' started by dangerly, Oct 2, 2015.

  1. dangerly macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2009
    #1
    Hello,
    upgraded to El Capitain on my iMac yesterday.
    Was looking into disk utilities to check and repair disk permissions, but can't find it there.
    Check/Repair disk permissions has been moved somewhere else or is missing from El Capitain?
    Thanks
     
  2. lagwagon Suspended

    lagwagon

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2014
    Location:
    Calgary, Alberta, Canada
    #3
    Not missing. It was removed because it's no longer required. SIP (System Integrity Proctection) protects all system files from getting modified. With this, permissions no longer can get messed up.
     
  3. dangerly thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2009
  4. GrumpyTrucker macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2014
    #5
    Unless you disable to allow one of the utility apps that it broke to run :)

    It's not something I've needed to do, but does anyone know if the disabling, once done, is permanent or does it reset at boot? And if permanent I wonder how you'd check and repair permissions in that case.

    I think this SIP will turn into one of those things that will divide opinion quite a bit. Anyone got popcorn?
     
  5. KALLT macrumors 601

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2008
    #6
    It’s persistent, you have to change it manually. Although an NVRAM reset should reset it as well (Command-Option-P-R keys at boot).

    OS X with System Integrity Protection on is the state that Apple supports. They don’t support permissions repair anymore because it is obsolete in their vision of OS X. You are free to disable System Integrity Protection, but doing so will be at your own peril. If you break something, you fix it yourself.
     
  6. deviant macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2007
    #7
    Just like it always was.
     
  7. Morpheo macrumors 65816

    Morpheo

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2014
    Location:
    Paris/Montreal
    #8
    However disabling SIP might be required in some cases, like mine: I use an audio interface with a perfectly working driver yet El Capitan told me it wasn't compatible. After disabling SIP my driver magically reappeared and my interface was back in business.

    I can take care of my system myself. I can repair permissions myself when I need to. Besides, they removed the functionality from Disk Utility but that doesn't mean they can't be repaired. So to anyone who have to disable SIP for one reason or another, consider this little command line utility called RepairPermissions: https://www.firewolf.science/2015/07/repairpermissions-v2-0-cli/
     
  8. KALLT macrumors 601

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2008
    #9
    Are you sure that your driver has been properly updated? Kext signing is now part of SIP, in Yosemite it was a standalone feature that could be disabled from within the system. You might have just disabled it.

    Even if you turn off SIP, it doesn’t screw up your file permissions. Almost always (sloppy) programs are at fault for screwing up permissions and with SIP on by default, hopefully many developers will stop doing that. It’s a win-win for everyone. RepairPermissions was a bandaid solution to something that wasn’t even supposed to be happening. With SIP, that is now within Apple’s control so it is no longer needed.
     
  9. Morpheo macrumors 65816

    Morpheo

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2014
    Location:
    Paris/Montreal
    #10
    Not yet updated but since it works without SIP, that's what I have to do for now, until SSL releases a new version. With that said, "not compatible" is a bit of a stretch, not compatible with El Capitan's SIP yes, not compatible with El Capitan no, since, obviously, it works 100% fine.

    I know it doesn't screw up file permissions even when it's off. But I find SIP and rootless a bit extreme, considering OS X is essentially a Unix system... Automating things is one thing, locking them is too much, particularly when one piece of software is declared incompatible by the OS when in fact, it's not.
     

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