China-to-Germany Cargo Train Takes 15 Days

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by obeygiant, Jan 24, 2008.

  1. obeygiant macrumors 68040

    obeygiant

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    #1
    Bloomberg

    I just think this is fascinating. If you haven't invested anything in China, now would be a good time.
     
  2. Unspeaked macrumors 68020

    Unspeaked

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    #2
    Which Chinese companies do you see having the greatest benefit from increased exports?
     
  3. Counterfit macrumors G3

    Counterfit

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    #3
    Now only if Russia and Belarus used standard gauge (4ft 8 1/2in., 1435mm), this would probably be even faster.
     
  4. SactoGuy18 macrumors 68030

    SactoGuy18

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    #4
    I think that could be fixed by using Wabash National's RoadRailer system. That way, they could do a quick swap for bogies between the standard and the Russian gauge at the Russian border with China/Mongolia and at the Belarus/Poland border.
     
  5. Counterfit macrumors G3

    Counterfit

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    #5
    I think that would probably take longer than Variable gauge axles in current use. I don't think that's quite the system in use, but probably a similar method.
     
  6. John Jacob macrumors 6502a

    John Jacob

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    #6
    Well, almost all of them. ;)
     
  7. Eraserhead macrumors G4

    Eraserhead

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    #7
    Given that a passenger train from Moscow to Bejing takes 6 days (source). I'm surprised that the goods train took as long as 15 days.
     
  8. MacHipster macrumors 6502

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  9. SactoGuy18 macrumors 68030

    SactoGuy18

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    #9
    It could be done, but that means you'll have to buy a big fleet of flat cars/spline cars with this variable gauge system--not exactly a cheap solution!
     
  10. latergator116 macrumors 68000

    latergator116

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    #10
    Not positive, but Im guessing the freight train has to go much slower than the passenger train
     
  11. ReanimationLP macrumors 68030

    ReanimationLP

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    #11
    Mainly because of all the extra weight.
     
  12. Iscariot macrumors 68030

    Iscariot

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    #12
    There's something romantic about travel by rail.
     
  13. takao macrumors 68040

    takao

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    #13
    also very likely freight trains have to give way to passenger trains which normally have higher priority

    also comparing germany-china to moscow-china isn't exactly fair since many problems are introduced when you leave russia (different track widths and don't forget more borders and of course different voltages for the trains)
     
  14. Tilpots macrumors 601

    Tilpots

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    #14
    Sounds like they also had to make several stops to split the train length and to unload and reload the cars to fit the Russian tracks. Wonder if they have the tracks for the passenger train all a standard width?

    I also wonder how they got all these countries to cooperate? Don't most of them pretty much hate each other? Guess it's the almighty dollar, or yen or rubble or deutche mark, or...
     
  15. guifa macrumors 6502

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    #15
    I don't get the impression that the variable gauge necessarily that much more expensive. The Talgos were designed pretty much with one market in mind, that is, Spain, to help ease the transition from 1668mm gauge (used on old lines) to 1435mm gauge (used on the high speed lines). In fact the two main producers of variable gauge cars are Spanish companies, CAF and Talgo. But, according to Wiki, DB is designing cars for the Germany-Russia route, and I'd suppose primarily with this freight operation in mind.
     
  16. EricNau Moderator emeritus

    EricNau

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    #16
    Unless you live in the U.S. ...Then it's the other way around. :rolleyes:
     
  17. SactoGuy18 macrumors 68030

    SactoGuy18

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    #17
    We already have something akin to a high-speed rail system in the USA--it's called Southwest Airlines. ;)
     
  18. Adovidoff macrumors newbie

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    Dec 24, 2008
    #18
    I do business with former USSR republics in Middle Asia by sending various cargo to China and then rail through China to its final destinations. Over the last few years I have seen the transit time go down substantially (5-8 days). Prior to this route I used to send cargo through Europe and European railway, experiencing huge delays and problems with documentation. I use West Coast Shipping (wcshipping.com) to arrange all the paperwork to move my cargo through China. They have years of experience and excellent connections in China to make this happen.
     
  19. mkrishnan Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

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    #19
    Very nicely done. The whole issue of unique rail widths in parts of Russia is a new one to me. But more Sino-European trade is a good thing.
     
  20. dmr727 macrumors G3

    dmr727

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    #20
    And just like a train, SWA isn't very good at stopping in distances much less than around a mile. ;)
     

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