clamxav virus scanner

Discussion in 'Mac Basics and Help' started by flimzy, Feb 19, 2014.

  1. flimzy macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2013
    #1
    I had clamxav scan my user last night around 12am just for a test. I noticed that it dropped the percentage of cpu idle to around 20-30 which isn't good. I thought the scan would finish in a few hours so i didn't check my computer this morning but when i got home about 10 minutes ago it was still scanning. This means it was scanning for about 18 hours or so. The cpu was working at 30 % idle and it seems kinda hot my mac. There is a slight smell coming from the mac but maybe I'm being paranoid but i can smell it. Is running it that long bad for my mac. just a little worried now.
     
  2. ardchoille50 macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2014
    #2
    You really don't need an anti-virus scanner on OS X.
     
  3. flimzy thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2013
    #3
    I'm talking about my cpu .
     
  4. ardchoille50 macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2014
    #4
    So, you're saying that your CPU wouldn't be thusly affected if you didn't run the anti-virus scan? Perhaps remove the anti-virus app since it isn't needed anyway?
     
  5. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #5
    Virus scans require system resources, so it's not unusual that your CPU is active and your temperatures rise.

    Macs are not immune to malware, but no true viruses exist in the wild that can run on Mac OS X, and there never have been any since it was released over 12 years ago. The only malware in the wild that can affect Mac OS X is a handful of trojans, which can be easily avoided by practicing safe computing (see below). 3rd party antivirus apps are not necessary to keep a Mac malware-free, as long as a user practices safe computing, as described in the following link.
    Read the What security steps should I take? section of the Mac Virus/Malware FAQ for tips on practicing safe computing.
     
  6. flimzy thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2013
    #6
    I see. Its just that theres a burning smell on my mac now and I'm not sure if that I'm just being paranoid or the cpu really burned up and caused damage. I'm just a little worried/upset.
     
  7. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #7
    If you're not already doing so, use iStat Pro (free) or iStat Menus ($16) to get accurate readings of your temps, fan speeds, etc., rather than relying on your sense of touch or sound. A forum member has posted a copy of iStat Pro that has been "tweaked" to enhance compatibility with Mountain Lion. You can download it here.
    The Intel processors used in Macs are designed to automatically shut down to prevent damage if they truly overheat. CPU Tjmax = 105C (221F), GPU Tjmax = 100C (212F) on i3, i5, i7 processors. (Source: Intel)
    Unless there is a rare defect in a Mac, most temps are well within the normal operating range, considering the workload being put on it. Websites with Flash content, games and other multimedia apps will put higher demand on the CPU/GPU, generating more heat. This is normal. If you're constantly putting high demands on your system, such as gaming or other multimedia tasks, expect temps to rise and fans to spin up accordingly. It's just your Mac doing its job to maintain temps within the normal range.
    It is also quite normal for your Mac to become extremely hot to the touch during intensive operations. The aluminum body transfers heat more effectively than other materials used in computer casings, so you will feel the heat more. This doesn't indicate that it's overheating and will not harm the computer to be hot to the touch.
    Your fans are always on when your Mac is on, spinning at a minimum of 2000 rpm (for MBPs) or 1800 rpm (for MBAs, MBs and minis), or 1200 for the newest MBAs. Older iMacs have 3 fans with minimum speeds in the 800-1200 range, while the newest iMacs have a single fan, spinning at a minimum of about 1400 rpm. They will spin faster as needed to keep temps at a safe level. If your fans are spinning up without increased heat, try resetting the SMC. (PRAM/NVRAM has nothing to do with these issues, so resetting it will not help.)
    The intake and exhaust vents are in the back of the computer near the hinge on all notebooks in the MacBook line (except the new MBP with retina display, which has intake vents along the sides at the bottom). The iMac vent is a slot on the back near the top of the computer. Make sure the vents remain unblocked to allow your computer to perform at its best. For Flash-related issues:
     
  8. flimzy thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2013
    #8
    Thank you for this answer. I have a 2008 mac mini so I'm sure it may apply to me as well. Do you personally use iStat?
     
  9. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #9
    Yes, I use both iStat Pro and iStat Menus. Very useful apps!
     

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